The Scan

RNA Rules, Dude

A blogger waxes poetic over the accomplishment of that less-celebrated nucleic acid.

A look back at the ups and downs of Human Genome Sciences' decade-and-a-half struggle to get a drug on the market.

Slashdot's abuzz with reaction to a Nobel laureate arguing against patents for therapeutics.

Waking up from a year-long nap? Nature ticks off the biggest scientific events of the last 12 months.

In a faux fur faux pas hip hop entrepreneur Sean 'P Diddy' Combs has been undone by mass spectrometry.

Modern neuroscience is eroding the idea of free will, says The Economist.

The first extensive investigation of Indian genetic diversity and population relationships samples 15 groups of India-born immigrants to the United States, genotyping each at 1,200 genetic markers genome-wide.

Analyze. Check results against database. Find out what it is. Sound familiar?

No holiday break for the flow of sad news from New Jersey's spectacularly mismanaged UMDNJ research hospital. Among the latest, a brand new $110 million cancer center sitting almost empty for lack of operating funds.

A computational biology blogger joins the ranks of the unemployed - but still finds time to ponder the genomics of organelles and endosymbionts.

Is politics in science "our equivalent of the Church"? YoungFemaleScientist thinks so.

Evolution Sticks

Settlement is reached in Georgia court case challenging the placement of anti-evo disclaimers on science textbooks.

India's New Frontier

HFSP welcomes India to its ever-expanding family.

Scanning Science

In this week's issue of Science, articles on metagenomics, proteomics, and comparative genomics.

Science's year-end edition takes a look at discredited papers -- scientific scandals that have cast doubt on the ability of peer-reviewed journals to ensure they're publishing the truth.

In an in-depth article, the WSJ reports on the price war between Affy and Illumina that's already enabling scientists to expand their research projects dramatically.

Nature ends its experiment into open peer review; papers went up for comments, but for the most part, the scientific community remained mum.

A pair of papers in today's edition of Nature find a solid correlation between the gut microbiome and the host's proclivity for obesity.

A new report from NCI joins the continuing debate: when is a biomarker really a biomarker? Plus, cool nanotech work from Chad Mirkin and others.

Parasite-induced cricket suicide: It's just plain old research until someone goes and makes a video of it.

A medical team serving in Libya has been handed the death penalty as a judge ruled that they deliberately infected children with HIV -- despite a Nature paper showing that the defendants couldn't have committed the crime.

Can't log into SciLink? A recent electrical fire knocked out the scientist networking site.

Companies say that genetic testing can be used as the basis for a personalized diet designed to protect you against your own genetic vulnerabilities. In the UK, a team is looking into these claims and wondering whether regulation is needed as nutrigenomics gears up.

Everyone gets called to task now and then to explain why taxpayer dollars are used for basic (what some would call high-risk) research. Here's a little help for your next go-round.

A four-year-old EU project comes to fruition with the planting of a ceremonial tree. Champions include Marc Vidal and John Sulston.

Pages

A research duo finds that science and technology graduate students who turn away from academic careers do so because of changes in their own interests.

Students whose classmates are interested in science are more likely to think about a career in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics, a new study says.

CNBC reports that the genetic counseling field is expected to grow as personalized medicine becomes more common.

Gladys Kong writes at Fortune that her STEM background has helped her as a CEO.