The Scan

This Week in Science

GTO scans today's edition of Science.

Clamoring for Access

The open access movement takes another step forward with a petition for free access to data from government-funded research.

A satirical news site predicts that scientists will attempt to map the genome of God.

A New York Times article documents concerns about the ethics around the ever-growing jurisdiction of IRBs.

This Week in Nature

GTO rounds up the relevant reads in today's edition of Nature.

A new blog gives tips on designing better graphs.

Time's science blogger muses on "the illusion we all have that things will go on pretty much as they are now."

Follow the Money

The Omics! Omics! blogger wonders where the money goes when there's a major financial failure in biotech.

Dell moves a step closer to offering Linux pre-installed.

Me and My Thermo

Blogging the installation of a new mass spec. What could be more fun?

Upheld, For Now

A California appeals court maintains the constitutionality of stem cell agency.

DNA analysis helps wildlife experts trace origins of contraband ivory.

Researchers find a gene whose variations correlate with performance IQ scores.

A 2002 study using adult stem cells may be flawed.

Two new studies make headway for therapeutics.

Researchers finish a draft of the North American plague’s genome.

A Mutt No More

The latest gene-testing app doesn't hunt for cancer; it tells you the breed of your dog.

This Week in Science

GTO rounds up the relevant reads in today's Science.

New research could help make liposuctioned stem cells a reliable way to regrow tissue.

This Week in Nature

GTO rounds up the relevant reads in today's edition of Nature.

Bacterial Computing

Organic computing takes a step forward through bacteria.

AJAX is good for bioinformatics web apps, too!

A PLoS Biology paper reports on DNA packing mechanisms. Not convinced? We've got a video, too.

Researchers design a simple genomic test to tell two cancers apart.

Hungry No More

MIT professor James Sherley ends his 12-day hunger strike without attaining tenure.

Pages

A research duo finds that science and technology graduate students who turn away from academic careers do so because of changes in their own interests.

Students whose classmates are interested in science are more likely to think about a career in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics, a new study says.

CNBC reports that the genetic counseling field is expected to grow as personalized medicine becomes more common.

Gladys Kong writes at Fortune that her STEM background has helped her as a CEO.