The Scan

This Week in Nature

In Nature this week: genome mining uncovers natural herbicide, and more.

Some Reunifications

The Arizona Republic reports that some young migrant children are being reunited with parents who passed both a criminal background check and a DNA test.

Letting Them Know

A new report urges investigators to routinely consider returning research results to study participants, according to Stat News.

The Wellcome Trust has announced that it is starting a new program to fund risky research ideas, Science reports.

In Genome Biology this week: processing and analyzing single-cell transcriptome data, computational strategy for designing CRISRP single guide RNAs, and more.

Face for the Suspect

Newport Beach police have turned to DNA phenotyping to generate images of a suspect in a 45-year-old murder, UPI reports.

University of California, San Diego researchers have tried a CRISPR-based gene drive in mice, according to Nature News.

How Long Do We Have?

A blood test aims to gauge a person's life expectancy, the Guardian reports.

This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: computational approach to bring together single-cell data, systems genetic analysis of Anopheles gambiae polymorphism, and more.

University of Adelaide researchers suggest that LINE-1 transposable elements may have driven the spit between therian mammals and monotremes.

Just From Dad

Buzzfeed News reports on the case of a young girl who inherited most of her genes from just her father.

To Store It All

A startup company is trying a different approach to DNA-based data storage, Digital Trends reports.

This Week in PLOS

In PLOS this week: genetics early flowering adaptations, genetic diversity and population structure of sandflies in the Americas, and more.

Federal officials are using DNA testing to reunite migrant families separated at the southern US border, CNN reports.

Modulate the Dose

CBS New York reports that pharmacogenomic testing can explain why some patients do not get relief from certain treatments.

This Week in Science

In Science this week: pair of genomics studies on ancient animals, and more.

Check the Results

Third-party analyses of raw data from direct-to-consumer genetic testing companies may not always be right, the New York Times reports.

One woman affected by Ireland's cervical cancer scandal has settled with the Irish health service and US-based Quest Diagnostics.

Making It Routine

The Guardian reports that England's National Health Service is to offer routine genomic medicine starting in October.

This Week in Nature

In Nature this week: the koala genome, genomic analysis of fern species, and more.

For the Ferns

Researchers have sequenced two fern species for the first time and uncovered some fern-specific genes, according to Discover's D-brief blog.

In Time for the Sun

Wired examines claims that some sunscreens can repair sun-caused DNA damage.

Scientific American reports that some people's susceptibility to infectious disease could be due variants within their own genomes.

This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: analysis of ancient human parvovirus B19, Toxoplasma gondii genotypes, and more.

The University of California, Irvine, is also removing his name from its biological sciences school, according to the New York Times.

Pages

At Nature, a graduate student describes how to explore careers outside academia and what PhD programs can do help that search.

A new analysis of research funding finds that after receiving their first award, female researchers are just about as likely to receive additional awards as male researchers.

The Nature Jobs blog reports that the University of Chicago is no longer requiring graduate school applicants to submit standardized test scores.

At Nature, the University of Alberta's Devang Mehta calls on PIs to engage in conversations about racism.