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The Scan

Wired reports on how genetic genealogy's use in forensics has exploded in the year since an arrest in the Golden State Killer case was made.

New York City has settled with a forensic scientist who was fired after questioning a DNA testing approach used by the medical examiner's office, the New York Times reports.

Retraction Watch reports that the increase in retracted papers at a journal is due to more resources there to tackle publication ethics.

This Week in Nature

In Nature this week: technique for measuring replication fork movement, WINTHER trial results, and more.

Ah, Feel Full Now

People reports that researchers have uncovered genetic variants that lead people to always feel full.

The Oregon state Senate unanimously passed a bill that would make it easier for people convicted of crimes to initiate DNA testing of evidence, according to the Associated Press.

Florida state senators are to weigh a bill prohibiting life insurance companies from using genetic information in coverage decisions, according to Florida Politics.

In Genome Research this week: metagenomic sequencing assay that detects pathogens in cerebrospinal fluid, single-tube long fragment read approach, and more.

The Washington Post reports that the US Department of Agriculture told its researchers to label peer-reviewed articles as "preliminary" work.

Australia will not be regulating gene editing of plants, animals, and human cell lines as long as no new genetic material is incorporated, reports Nature News.

Some Big Trees

Researchers have sequenced the genomes of both the coast redwood and the giant sequoia, according to the San Francisco Chronicle.

This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: study of epigenetic patterns in mammalian eggs, clonal expansion patterns in CD8+ T cells, and more.

Science reports that MD Anderson Cancer Center has dismissed three researchers over foreign tie concerns.

Pushed Aside

The New York Times Magazine examines gender discrimination at the Salk Institute.

Looking Into It

A second death in gene therapy trial for type 1 spinal muscular atrophy is under investigation, according to Reuters.

This Week in PLOS

In PLOS this week: antibiotic resistance patterns in Escherichia coli, a dozen genetic loci tied to varicose vein risk, and more.

St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists have treated infants with X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency using gene therapy in an early phase study.

Same Scam, New Tech

Bloomberg reports that the DNA-for-cash deal reported in Kentucky might be a more widespread scam.

St. Louis Public Radio reports that some African Americans are turning to DNA ancestry testing to help guide genealogical searches.

This Week in Nature

In Nature this week: a genomic analysis of the snailfish Pseudoliparis swirei, ancient DNA analysis gives insight into the introduction of farming to England, and more.

No Part

A Stanford University investigation finds that its researchers did not take part in He Jiankui's work to develop gene-edited infants.

The long-running Framingham Heart Study has received a $38 million grant, according to the Boston Globe.

One From Each

Retraction Watch reports that two researchers had both a Science and a Nature paper retracted last week.

In Genome Biology this week: genomic sequencing of milkweed bug, benchmark comparison of single-cell RNA sequencing platforms, and more.

NPR's Morning Edition reports that a number of CRISPR-based gene editing treatments are to be tested soon in humans in the US.

Pages

Researchers who go persevere after an early funding setback end up with more highly cited papers later on, according to the Economist.

Nature News reports that female scientists setting up their first labs tend to have lower salaries and smaller staffs than their male peers.

A new analysis by Northwestern University researchers finds that female and male first-time PIs receive differing amounts of funding.

Some 43 percent of new mothers and 23 percent of new fathers leave full-time employment in STEM in the years after having a child, Science Careers says.