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The Scan

In Science this week: a review says lifestyles of industrialized societies may be threatening needed gut microbial communities, and more.

Harder to Find

Law enforcement officials say that changes to genetic genealogy databases have limited their ability to track down some suspects, NBC News reports.

Mice whose gut microbiomes have been disrupted are unable to overcome fear conditioning, New Scientist says.

A new study finds women are less likely than men to write invited commentaries in medical journals.

In Nature this week: pan-cancer study of metastatic solid tumors, genetic variants associated with range of traits cluster by region in the UK, and more.

Seven individuals have been named to the President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology, ScienceInsider reports.

Retraction Watch reports that a series of tweets led to expression of concern for a PLOS Genetics paper, a move the paper's authors disagree with.

Researchers have sequenced pumas from North and South America to enable better identification of inbreeding, Cosmos magazine reports.

In Nucleic Acids Research this week: ways to find cell death or proliferation signatures, Han Chinese population genome database, and more.

Bernard Fisher Dies

Bernard Fisher, a surgeon who changed how breast cancer is treated, has died at 101, the New York Times reports.

The US Department of Justice has proposed a rule change to enable DNA to be collected from migrants, the Associated Press reports.

Just Another Diet

Washington Post columnist writes that she is skeptical about DNA-based diets.

In PNAS this week: recurrent inactivation of DEPDC5 in gastrointestinal stromal tumors, taxonomic reliability of GenBank sequences, and more.

Russian CRISPR researcher moves along with plans to ultimately alter the genes of embryos of deaf couples, though awaits regulatory approval, Nature News reports.

Up And At 'Em

University of California, San Francisco, researchers have uncovered a gene mutations that appears to make a father-son duo more efficient sleepers.

Coverage Begins

NPR reports a large health insurer has begun to cover some pharmacogenetic tests for psychiatric drugs.

In PLOS this week: genome-wide association study of non-syndromic orofacial cleft subtypes, epigenetic and transcriptomic analysis of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, and more.

New research shows that scientists need to do a better job of including a wider diversity of African genomes in their analyses, STAT says.

A new paper in Science shows that men are still winning a large majority of the most sought-after NIH grants.

Science Like a Girl

Nature Research and the Estée Lauder Companies are awarding efforts to encourage girls to pursue careers in the STEM fields.

In Science this week: beneficial genetic variants inherited from archaic Neanderthal and Denisovan hominins, and more.

O Canad[ian Science]!

As the Canadian election season heats up, neither major party has really paid much attention to science, according to Nature News.

BBC News says the uncertainty over Brexit is affecting science funding in the UK.

A new app purports to tell users "how gay" they are by looking at their DNA, but experts tell Futurism that the app is bunk.

In Nature this week: human and great ape cerebral organoids reveal aspects of brain development unique to humans, and more.

Pages

Nature survey reports that PhD students' experiences can be frustrating, but also satisfying.

A proposed rule would deem graduate students at private institutions to not be employees, which ScienceInsider reports might affect unionization efforts.

A new study finds that a positive lab environment can encourage undergraduates to continue to perform research.

A new analysis suggests non-US citizen STEM PhDs might pass up jobs at US-based startups due to visa concerns.