The Scan

Second X Helping

UCSF researchers find that having two X chromosomes may contribute to women's longer lifespans, according to Discover's D-brief blog.

This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: immune cell profiling of wild baboons by social status, metabolomics profiling of esophageal tumors, and more.

Corn's Complex Path

A genomic analysis of modern and ancient maize reveals a complicated domestication history, according to Reuters.

Five and Gone

CNBC reports that half of academic researchers leave after about five years.

This Week in PLOS

In PLOS this week: MYRF variant linked to congenital diaphragmatic hernia, analysis of the "dragon's blood" red resin produced by traditional medicine plants, and more.

From Within the Swamp

Researchers have used genetic analysis to confirm a new type of salamander, the New York Times reports.

Standards Needed

In an editorial, officials from scientific societies in the US and China call for the international community to develop criteria and standards for human germline editing.

Faster Profiles

The Washington Post reports on a Federal Bureau of Investigation plan to place rapid DNA analyzers at booking stations around the country.

Conflict Search

The US National Institutes of Health is to review studies that have received private support for conflicts of interest, according to the New York Times.

This Week in Science

In Science this week: the PsychENCODE Consortium reports on the molecular mechanisms of neuropsychiatric disorders, and more.

Scramble for Tissue

Stat News reports that the pause on procuring fetal tissue for intramural US National Institutes of Health research will soon affect additional labs there.

The Wall Street Journal reports there is uncertainty surrounding whether He Jiankui's embryo editing did what he said it did.

Weigh the Knowledge

Customers might want to consider what they might learn about their risk of diseases like Alzheimer's before snagging the genetic testing kits that are on many gift guides this year, NJ.com writes.

This Week in Nature

In Nature this week: genomic analysis of the invasive fall webworm, amp of constrained coding regions within the human genome, and more.

Missed a Few

Newsday reports that breast cancer genetic testing guidelines for are out of date and may miss individuals.

Blame the Follicles

A genome-wide association study highlights a potential role for hair follicles in acne risk, according to New Scientist.

This Week in Cell

In Cell this week: gene editing-based strategy to screen for immune system regulators, ancient plague patterns, and more.

Publication of He Jiankui's work on gene-edited infants would raise ethical concerns for journals, Wired and others report.

Told to Pause

ScienceInsider reports that US National Institutes of Health researchers were told in the fall they could not obtain new human fetal tissue.

The New York Times reports that evidence linking trauma in one generation to epigenetic effects that influence subsequent generations may be overstated.

This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: skin pigmentation evolution among KhoeSan, biomarkers for dengue virus progression, and more.

Lost Some Value There

The Wall Street Journal reports Human Longevity's valuation has dropped by 80 percent.

Not Mentioning It

The New York Times and ProPublica say that many physicians fail to disclose their financial ties when publishing in medical journals.

Slight Budget Trim

Science reports that the US National Cancer Institute is cutting its operating budget by 5 percent.

This Week in PLOS

In PLOS this week: similar variants seen in bullbogs, people with Robinow syndrome; ApoE genotypes in African-American, Puerto Rican populations; and more.

Pages

Researchers find that younger investigators fare better when seeking support through crowdfunding sites, Nature News reports.

Nature News reports that doing a postdoc might not help researchers find employment.

Pennsylvania State University's Kathleen Grogan says researchers need to approach data on gender and racial diversity in the sciences like they would any other dataset.

The National Science Foundation is adding questions about sexual orientation and gender identity to its Survey of Earned Doctorates, according to Science Careers.