The Scan

Upward of One Hundred

A new study links more than a hundred genes to autism spectrum disorder, Discover's D-brief blog reports.

India's Council of Scientific and Industrial Research has a new director-general, according to ScienceInsider.

This Week in Science

In Science this week: genetic mutations typically associated with esophageal cancer are common in older, healthy individuals, and more.

This year's Breakthrough Prize winners include a pair that developed a therapy for spinal muscular atrophy.

The New York Times reports on how white supremacists misconstrue genetic research, concerning many geneticists.

Researchers find that people's genetics influence their success at university, but that it is not the only factor.

This Week in Nature

In Nature this week: approach to identify genetic variants that affect trait variability, application of read clouds to microbiome samples, and more.

Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen also contributed to brain research, NPR reports.

Been Reclassified

The New York Times reports on the shifting interpretations of what some genetic variants mean over time.

MIT's Technology Review reports on Genentech's pursuit of personalized cancer vaccines.

This Week in Cell

In Cell this week: investigation of metastatic tumor evolution, more than 16,000 genetic variants introduced into the budding yeast model organism, and more.

What's in Store?

The Asbury Park Press reports on the startup Genomic Prediction's test to determine an embryo's risk of disease.

In on the Action

NPR reports that with medical data being big business, some companies want to get patients involved.

This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: optical mapping allows glimpse of structural variants, disease-linked GATA2 mutations boosts its protein activity, and more.

Senator Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) has released the results of a genetic ancestry analysis, the Boston Globe reports.

Thomas Steitz Dies

Thomas Steitz, who won the 2009 chemistry Nobel Prize for his ribosome work, has died, the Washington Post reports.

Retraction Watch's Ivan Oransky and Adam Marcus report that Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women's Hospital have recommended that more than 30 papers from a former researcher be retracted.

This Week in PLOS

In PLOS this week: mechanisms for genes implicated in coronary artery disease, rumen microbes and host genetics influence cow methane production, and more.

Researchers in China have generated mouse pups from same-sex parents, according to Scientific American.

The South China Morning Post reports that Hong Kong plans to add HK$20 billion (US$2.6 billion) to a research endowment.

Don't Touch

Two research teams find a role for PIEZO2 in touch sensitivity after injury and inflammation.

This Week in Science

In Science this week: open genetic genealogy databases can lead to the identification of individuals who have not sought testing, and more.

New US rules on foreign investment could slow investment in biotech, Stat News reports.

Researchers in New Zealand report that genetic factors influence gout more than diet.

A Score for That

Nature News looks into the debates surrounding polygenic risk scores.

Pages

The National Science Foundation is adding questions about sexual orientation and gender identity to its Survey of Earned Doctorates, according to Science Careers.

Nature asked scientists whether they were satisfied with their careers to find that most were, with some variation.

Gene editing is expected to give rise to new job opportunities, according to BBC Capital.

A new analysis finds that better grant-writing skills may help early-career researchers stay funded and stay in academia.