The Scan

Bioethicists weigh the idea of charging patients to take part in clinical research, coming down against the approach.

A National Science Foundation-funded project aims to give researchers access to a network many times faster than the Internet.

This Week in PLOS

In PLOS this week: gene fusion in premature ovarian failure, population patterns in the Franciscana dolphin, and more.

The US Food and Drug Administration has approved four molecularly targeted drugs this month, suggesting that personalized medicine has "turned a corner."

Representative Lamar Smith brings back a provision to require the National Science Foundation to certify that each study it funds is "in the national interest."

The Coming Changes

PLOS Biology has asked researchers how they envision the future of genetics and genomics.

More There

NIH's Sally Rockey examines the tapped and untapped potential of the NIH peer reviewer pool.

This Week in Science

In Science this week: caution urged in use of gene drives, and more.

The US is heading toward another budget showdown, Nature News says.

Continuing Access

A Senate committee has unanimously approved a bill to require articles resulting from federally funded projects to be made publicly available, according to ScienceInsider.

The Center for Data Innovation and HealthITNow argue for re-building of genomic research infrastructure.

This Week in Nature

In Nature this week: mouse genome functional analysis, more sensitive chromatin immunoprecipitation, and more.

'Really?'

The San Diego Union-Tribune posts videos from Biocom's Speaker Series with Illumina's Jay Flatley, who discusses Roche's failed hostile takeover bid.

And Again

Ivan Oransky discusses the need for reproducibility research at The Conversation.

Big Claim

Critics call the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center's Gary Gilliland's prediction of cancer cures within 10 years "out of touch with reality" and "irresponsible."

This Week in Cell

In Cell this week: map of human protein interactions, mutant phenotype variability in organisms of the same species from different genetic backgrounds, and more.

This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: human T cell editing with CRISPR, retrotransposons acting as insulators, and more.

Wang Leaves BGI Post

Jun Wang, the chief executive of BGI, has stepped down.

The San Diego Union Tribune wonders whether Medicare is ready for personalized medicine.

The New York Times' George Johnson muses on cancer's roots in multicellularity.

Wired writes that CRISPR could change the world — in many imaginative ways — and whether it will be for the better is still in the air.

The NIH has issued a preliminary guidance for newborn dried blood spot research.

Sheen of Science

The term 'epigenetics' is being used by quacks to give them a veneer of science, writes Adam Rutherford at the Observer.

In a column at Nature, researcher Fyodor Kondrashov worries about the influence of politics on Russian science.

This Week in PLOS

In PLOS this week: locus linked to non-syndromic hearing loss, phylogenetic relationships of Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates, and more.

Pages

A foundation grant director writes at Nature Jobs that applicants should explain their budget requests well.

New faculty members need to allocate their startup funds wisely, and asking around for advice and discarded equipment helps stretch the budget.

In a pair of blog posts, Nature Jobs looks at both the employer's and the job candidate's perspective of filling a faculty position.

If you're looking to make a career change, Nature Jobs notes that's the time to refresh your soft and hard skills — strategically.