The Scan

The New York Times reports that new director of the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention makes more than other agency heads.

Down to One Person

Science speaks with Columbia University's Yaniv Erlich about using genetic genealogical data to identify people.

CRISPR Work Ahead

CBS News' 60 Minutes dives into CRISPR gene editing and how it could be used to treat disease.

This Week in PLOS

In PLOS this week: cancer predisposition among Cowden/Cowden-like and Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba syndrome patients, and more.

A familial match at a genetic genealogy site has led police to make an arrest in the decades-old Golden State Killer case, the Sacramento Bee reports.

Mammoth Biosciences says it is developing a CRISPR-based platform to detect and diagnose disease.

This Week in Science

In Science this week: single-cell sequencing to study zebrafish and frog embryonic development.

Getting It Early

Researchers have treated an X-linked genetic disease affecting three babies in utero, Stat News reports.

Researchers have sequenced samples from ancient toilets to study past eating habits and health, NPR reports.

The Associated Press reports that the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is beefing up sequencing as a tool to investigate foodborne illnesses.

This Week in Nature

In Nature this week: ash dieback disease fungal genome, and more.

What happens to scientific papers when certain journals are no longer published? Some scientists are trying to make sure they don't disappear forever.

A study in Microbiome finds that heavy drinkers have an unhealthy mix of bacteria in their mouths.

Doctors and patients are still trying to figure out what role at-home genetic testing should play in healthcare, Newsweek says.

In Genome Research this week, mismatch repair deficiency in C. elegans, retracing transcriptions start site evolution in the human genome, and more. 

Here We Are Again

American scientists find themselves once again warning the Trump administration not to dismiss science, the New Yorker report.

In the Pink

A new study suggests CRISPR could be used to save coral reefs from dying off, Forbes reports.

All Tied Up in a Bow

Researchers have found that the i-motif shape of DNA previously observed in the lab also exists in human cells, and that it may serve a purpose.

This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: a genomic, transcriptomic, and metabolomic analysis of the tea plant, Arabidopsis thaliana's adaptations to specific local environments, and more.

In an against-all-odds twist, a researcher studying exceeding rare FOXG1 mutations discovers her daughter has the syndrome.

An effort by Genomics Medicine Ireland is creating a database of diseases based on the genomics of people in Ireland. It now is looking into the possibility of including Scotland in its work.

In recent weeks, the direct-to-consumer genetics firm has rolled out a health hub where customers can share information concerning 18 common health conditions.

This Week in PLOS

In PLOS this week, new genes associated with prostate cancer risk, genetic patterns in M. bovis, and more.

Diving Evolution

Researchers have uncovered signals of selection that may enable the Bajau people to free five hundreds of feet deep, Reuters reports.

Years and Years

A new analysis examines the gender gap among paper authors in the sciences and says it may take decades or more to close.

Pages

Two postdocs and a PhD hosted a panel discussion at Memorial Sloan Kettering on career advancement in science and what researchers can expect when they leave the lab.

An analysis of speakers at the American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting finds that women are less likely to be invited to talk, according to the Guardian.

An analysis appearing in PeerJ finds that social media mentions of a paper may lead to increased citations.

NIH's Michael Lauer looks at the number of grants, their amount, and funding success rates at the agency for last year.