The Scan

Advantage, But Risk

Yale researchers find that autism risk-linked genes are also associated with increased cognitive ability, according to the Independent.

This Week in Nature

In Nature this week: genome-mining tool to study modified peptides, variants linked to macular telangiectasia type 2, and more.

Move It Along

In a speech to Congress, President Donald Trump called the drug approval process at FDA "slow and burdensome."

CBC Marketplace commissions DNA testing of chicken sandwiches at Subway and other fast-food chains.

Turn It Up or Down

Variants in the IFITM3 gene affect inflammatory response to infection, UPI reports.

In Genome Research this week: algorithm to tease out strains from metagenomic sequences, drug resistance mechanisms in cancer cells, and more.

A floated budget plan could see non-military discretionary spending in the US — which includes science agency funding — fall, the New York Times reports.

All the Swabs

Proove Biosciences had allegedly been paying doctors to perform its opioid risk and other genetic tests, Stat News reports.

Rare Answers

Sequencing is enabling the roots of some rare diseases to be determined, the Financial Times reports.

This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: flu susceptibility and Y chromosome variation in mice, deletion tied to epilepsy in dog breed, and more.

How to Win a 'War'

For those who are concerned about Trump administration actions related to science, a new column in Scientific American has suggestions for ways to fight back.

Yep, Everybody

The Earth BioGenome Project plans to sequence all life on Earth, according to ScienceInsider.

Chewed to Bits

An NC State researcher is exploring the use of CRISPR-Cas3 as an anti-microbial, Gizmodo reports.

This Week in PLOS

In PLOS this week: a sequencing-based screen of Lyme disease-causing pathogen, the range of animals bitten by Anopheles darling mosquitoes in Peru, and more.

Researchers in Japan describe a chimpanzee with a chromosomal abnormality similar to human Down syndrome, Mashable reports.

Two dozen scientific organizations have endorsed the March for Science, according to ScienceInsider.

Decisions, Decisions

At the Conversation, the University of Oxford's Michael Macklay writes that learning genetic risk of disease is a personal decision.

This Week in Science

In Science this week: genetic target for urothelial bladder cancer treatment, and more.

Two neuroscientists write in Nature News that solving the "reproducibility crisis" in science may require changing the requirements for publication.

Misconduct Costs Job

A Karmagenes researcher has lost his position after reportedly admitting to data fabrication, according to Retraction Watch.

Microbial Moisturizer

A new study finds that adding missing good bacteria to the skin microbiome of atopic dermatitis patients decreases Staphylococcus aureus colonization.

This Week in Nature

In Nature this week: genomic analysis of prehistoric New Mexicans, a nanopore method for mapping DNA methylation, and more.

British researchers say they've been removed from EU grant applications, according to the Guardian.

Some 57 snow monkeys at a Japanese zoo were found to be rhesus macaque hybrids, which are banned in Japan.

Some people who harbor genetic variants associated with disease show no signs and may give insight into the continuum of symptoms, Spectrum reports.

Pages

New study finds bias against female lecturers among student course evaluations, the Economist reports.

A research duo finds that science and technology graduate students who turn away from academic careers do so because of changes in their own interests.

Students whose classmates are interested in science are more likely to think about a career in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics, a new study says.

CNBC reports that the genetic counseling field is expected to grow as personalized medicine becomes more common.