The Scan

In Genome Biology this week: epigenetic differences in CML cells, predicting aggressive prostate cancer, and more.

Stat News reports that Joseph Gulfo is another contender for FDA commissioner.

Screen Time

There's a heritable aspect to how much time people spend online, the Los Angeles Times reports.

The Model Ant

A Rockefeller University researcher is using edited ants to explore complex biological systems, the New York Times writes.

This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: variation patterns in wheat lines, regulatory variation in Capsella grandiflora, and more.

Scientists in Protest

Researchers were among this weekend's protesters bemoaning the new US administration, Vox reports.

Through Their Paces

A draft guidance from the FDA suggests the agency wants to more tightly control gene-edited animals, according to Technology Review.

The New York Times speaks with Vanderbilt's John Anthony Capra about Neanderthal genes in modern humans.

This Week in PLOS

In PLOS this week: nasal microbial communities in asthma patients; sequencing-based way to detect, track schistosomiasis; and more.

Bit Longer at NIH

The Trump transition team has asked NIH Director Francis Collins to remain at his post, though it's unclear for how long that will be.

FDA and Invention

Outgoing FDA commissioner Robert Califf writes in an editorial that the agency can help boost innovation.

Scientific Glory

An academic laments the rise of narcissism in the sciences, the Guardian reports.

This Week in Science

In Science this week: metagenomic-based technique for determining protein structure, and more.

The first Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology papers show mixed results.

New Rule

The final revision of the Common Rule doesn't include the proposed change requiring consent for leftover biospecimens.

The Wall Street Journal reports that National Institutes of Health Director Francis Collins' response to contamination concerns at the agency might have delayed care.

This Week in Nature

In Nature this week: mobile phone-based targeted DNA sequencing, and more.

Second Failure

Prior to being closed, Theranos' Arizona lab failed an inspection by regulators, according to the Wall Street Journal.

Questions for Price

HHS Secretary nominee Tom Price is to go in front of the Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions today, NPR's Morning Edition reports.

Because gene-edited organisms can cross borders, Gizmodo wonders whether there should be an international body to govern their use.

In Nucleic Acids Research this week: nanopore sequencing workflow to detect antibiotic resistance in gut microbes, TSSPlant tool, and more.

President-elect Donald Trump considers other candidates for director of the National Institutes of Health, Nature News reports.

Mark of a Concussion

Researchers find that blood tests might be able to help determine severity of a concussion, Wired reports.

For Science Advice

Technology Review points out that a new US presidential science advisor hasn't been selected.

This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: carbapenem resistance in Enterobacteriaceae, selection against educational attainment-linked variants, and more.

Pages

Students whose classmates are interested in science are more likely to think about a career in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics, a new study says.

CNBC reports that the genetic counseling field is expected to grow as personalized medicine becomes more common.

Gladys Kong writes at Fortune that her STEM background has helped her as a CEO.

Social scientists report that the image of the 'lone scientist' might be deterring US students from STEM careers.