The Scan

In Genome Research this week: collection of circular RNAs from breast cancers, chromosome-scale genome assembly for the axolotl, and more.

 The Associated Press reports that Nobel laureate Craig Mello was informed about He Jiankui's efforts to edit human embryos.

Can Also Pay for It

The National Health Service in England is to offer healthy individuals the option of paying to have their genomes analyzed, according to the Guardian.

Axolotl Assembly

A University of Kentucky-led team has generated a new axolotl genome assembly, Discover's D-brief blog reports.

This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: Fanconi anemia protein role in ribosome biogenesis, small interfering RNAs in A. thaliana seeds development, and more.

Open for a While

Though the US government is open, ScienceInsider says it'll be a while before everything is back to normal at federal research agencies.

Maryland lawmakers consider bill to prevent law enforcement from using publicly available DNA databases to identify suspects, the Daily Record reports.

The New York Times reports on new gene therapy efforts to treat sickle-cell disease.

This Week in PLOS

In PLOS this week: statistical approach for integrating eQTL and GWAS data, microRNA signature distinguishes malignant and benign salivary gland tumors, and more.

Oh, Dunno

ABC News reports on former Theranos CEO Elizabeth Holmes' deposition to the Securities and Exchange Commission.

Unexpected Kits

In a bid to amass hard-to-trace gift cards from a refer-a-friend program, hackers ordered 2,400 DNA ancestry testing kits for strangers, according to USA Today.

So the Ripples Go

The effects of the partial government shutdown in the US on science keep spreading.

This Week in Science

In Science this week: high-resolution map of human genetic recombination, and more.

Direct-to-consumer genetic testing firm 23andMe has a newly cleared colorectal cancer risk test.

Which Way to Go

The New York Times reports on international efforts to oversee and regulate gene-editing work.

Gene Drive-Ish

New Scientist reports on new study of gene drives in mice that found that they might not work as hoped.

This Week in Nature

In Nature this week: study of gene drive feasibility in lab mice, circulating tumor DNA from cerebrospinal fluid to track glioma progression, and more.

To Track Cholera

Nature calls for genomics to become part of the World Health Organization's cholera surveillance approach.

Reuters reports that UK researchers are using gene-editing tools to develop flu-resistant chickens.

Better Odds?

Vox explores a proposal to institute a lottery system to award grant funds.

In Genome Biology this week: gut microbiome study of individuals from Tanzania and Botswana, sixth version of the Network of Cancer Genes database, and more.

John Mendelsohn Dies

John Mendelsohn, a former president of the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, has died, the New York Times reports.

Chinese state news agency Xinhua reports that a preliminary investigation has found He Jiankui performed his gene-editing work illegally.

Identical twins receive different estimates of ancestry from the same direct-to-consumer genetic testing firms, CBC reports.

This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: chromosomal features of maize, adaptations in the vinous-throated parrotbill, and more.

Pages

Mental health issues are more likely to affect graduate students than other Americans, Scientific American reports.

Researchers find that younger investigators fare better when seeking support through crowdfunding sites, Nature News reports.

Nature News reports that doing a postdoc might not help researchers find employment.

Pennsylvania State University's Kathleen Grogan says researchers need to approach data on gender and racial diversity in the sciences like they would any other dataset.