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The Scan

This Week in Cell

In Cell this week: B cell responses in Ebola survivors, two mRNA anti-terminator proteins, and more.

Priciest Yet

Novartis's newly approved Zolgensma, a gene therapy for spinal muscular atrophy, is to cost $2.1 million, the AP says.

Not Currently There

A draft bill proposed by a US House of Representatives spending panel does not currently include language barring the editing of a human embryo, ScienceInsider reports.

Rearranging Control

Reuters reports that draft legislation in Hungary would create a new public institution to oversee research instead of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences.

This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: tool to predict pathogenic gene pairs, analysis of bat evolution, and more.

The former commissioner of the FDA has returned to the venture capital firm New Enterprise Associates as a special partner on the healthcare investment team.

Astronauts have edited yeast genes on the International Space Station in an experiment designed to show how cells repair themselves in space.

Two Leave Emory

Emory University has found that two of its researchers failed to divulge they had received funds from China, according to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

This Week in Science

In Science this week: influence of the nuclear genome on human mitochondrial DNA, and more.

China may include regulations protecting genes and embryos in its update of its civil code, Nature News reports.

23andMe and Airbnb have partnered to offer "heritage travel," according to Venture Beat.

This Week in Nature

In Nature this week: exome sequence analysis of individuals with type 2 diabetes, genomic prediction of maize yield across environments, and more.

NPR reports on efforts to engineer bacteriophages to destroy antibiotic-resistance bacteria.

An international commission is to develop a report on how researchers, clinicians, and regulators should evaluate the clinical applications of human germline genome editing.

The American Prospect writes that the pilot program to test the DNA of migrants could lead to more family separations.

To Boost Productivity

The US Department of Agriculture presents a new blueprint for animal genomic research.

In Genome Research this week: repetitive element deletion linked to altered methylation and more in form of muscular dystrophy; human contamination in draft bacterial and archaeal genomes; and more.

GEDmatch Opts Outs

According to New Scientist, GEDmatch changed its terms and conditions over the weekend to opt its users out of law enforcement searches.

A twin study uncovers evidence that genes may influence whether someone gets a dog, Martha Stewart reports.

Noisy Signal

The Atlantic looks into time spent pursuing gene leads generated through candidate gene studies.

This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: Cdx2 cells can help regenerate heart tissue in mice following a heart attack, PIWI-interacting small RNA levels in human cancer, and more.

A bill passed by a US House of Representatives appropriations subcommittee would give scientific agencies including the National Science Foundation boosts in funding.

Model of Discovery

University of Idaho researchers model the scientific discovery process to examine the link between reproducibility and scientific truth.

Limit of Relevance

Relocating USDA agencies outside of Washington, DC, may make them less effective, critics of the move tell NPR.

This Week in PLOS

In PLOS this week: genes that help Borrelia burgdorferi survive in ticks, CiliaCarta collection of about 1,000 suspected cilia genes, and more.

Pages

At the Guardian, the University of Edinburgh's Nikolay Ogryzko argues that universities need to better invest in postdocs' careers.

Researchers who go persevere after an early funding setback end up with more highly cited papers later on, according to the Economist.

Nature News reports that female scientists setting up their first labs tend to have lower salaries and smaller staffs than their male peers.

A new analysis by Northwestern University researchers finds that female and male first-time PIs receive differing amounts of funding.