The Scan

This Week in Nature

In Nature this week: informatics approach for recovering microbial genomes from metagenomes, and more.

Go Small or Go Big?

The Wall Street Journal reports that some researchers are pinning their hopes to small, targeted clinical trials, while others argue large trials are still needed.

Researchers treated a fetus with a severe genetic disorder while still in the womb, according to the New York Times.

Promises, But Really?

NPR reports that some at-home medical tests might not be able to provide the information they say they can.

This Week in Cell

In Cell this week: interactions between malignant and immune cells in ovarian cancer, gene regulatory features in mouse macrophages, and more.

Craig Venter is retiring from Human Longevity to return to the research institution that bears his name, the San Diego Union-Tribune reports.

A Canadian project aims to sequence the lynx and the snowshoe hare, according to CBC News.

Peruvian researchers rely on genetic analyses to trace the origins of the Incas, AFP reports.

This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: retrotransposon expression and regulation in human cells, convergent evolution in photoreceptor proteins, and more.

Researchers have sequenced the northern white rhinoceros to gauge whether it could be brought back from the edge of extinction, the New York Times reports.

Tufts University researchers found a role for miRNA in transmitting stress between generations, the Economist reports.

Bavaria expands its forensic genetic analyses to include DNA phenotyping, raising discrimination concerns.

This Week in Science

In Science this week: gut microbiome influences liver cancer growth, spread; and more.

Make Sense of It All

The Atlantic reports that genetic counselors are coping with an influx of patients seeking advice on their direct-to-consumer genetic test results.

Variations on Results

A small study finds differences between three genomic prostate cancer tests, Medscape reports.

Of Many Minds

A survey of Canadians finds them to be divided on genetically modified food, the Ottawa Citizen reports.

This Week in Nature

In Nature this week: shared genetic architecture for asthma and allergic diseases, and more.

Quickly, Quickly

Gene therapies could qualify for a faster US Food and Drug Administration approval process, according to Stat News.

Twisting the Results

Science speaks with the University of Michigan's Jedidiah Carlson, who has tracked population genetic discussions at white nationalist sites.

NPR reports that the US House of Representatives has passed a bill to enable terminally ill patients access to experimental drugs.

In Genome Research this week: inversion variants mapped in human, non-human primate genomes; transcriptome profiling of maize, sorghum; and more.

Hide, Nessie, Hide

A team of researchers plans to sample Loch Ness for environmental DNA, according to Newsweek.

US News & World Report writes that genetic testing of lung tumors can help identify treatments for patients.

Even More Variety

The New York Times writes about the appearance of mosaicism in healthy people.

This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: insecticide resistance patterns Anopheles gambiae mosquito, transcriptome patterns in Pseudomonas aeruginosa during infection, and more.

Pages

A National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine report calls for changing metrics to make STEM graduate school more student-centered, according to Science.

Two postdocs and a PhD hosted a panel discussion at Memorial Sloan Kettering on career advancement in science and what researchers can expect when they leave the lab.

An analysis of speakers at the American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting finds that women are less likely to be invited to talk, according to the Guardian.

An analysis appearing in PeerJ finds that social media mentions of a paper may lead to increased citations.