The Scan

In Genome Biology this week: study of selection in orangutan populations, eQTLs in developing human brain, and more.

China has ordered an investigation into claims that CRISPR was used to genetically modify two human infants, the Guardian reports.

The US Food and Drug Administration is developing a new approach for clearing medical devices to take technological advances and modern safety and performance requirements into account.

This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: germline variants influence tumor immune gene expression in two dozen cancer types, phylogenetic relationships of hemipteroid insects, and more.

Southern University of Science and Technology's He Jiankui has announced the birth of twin girls who underwent CRISPR-based editing of their CCR5 genes.

Duty to Tell?

A UK woman sues a hospital for not telling her of her father's genetic testing results, the Guardian reports.

And Settled

Science reports that the Salk Institute has settled the third of its three gender discrimination lawsuits.

This Week in PLOS

In PLOS this week: sequencing of Chardonnay clones, high-density peach tree genetic map, and more.

The New York Times Magazine writes that proteomics might be better poised than genomics to say when someone is falling ill.

"Must Stop"

In an editorial, Nature calls for the end to the exploitation of foreign postdocs.

Lab Space and a Dream

Bloomberg profiles IndieBio, a startup incubator for the life sciences.

In Nucleic Acids Research this week: collection of epigenome-wide association study data, updated BloodSpot database, and more.

A settlement is expected in a Duke University lawsuit hinging on using falsified data to win grants, Retraction Watch and Science report.

A new study finds that a placental protein linked with preeclampsia can be targeted by RNA silencing, according to the New Scientist.

Something Different

A phylogenetic analysis finds that the rare hemimastigotes form their own supra-kingdom, CBC reports.

This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: approach for analyzing the expression of endogenous retroviruses, circular RNAs that influence host-virus interactions, and more.

Free-Ish

Nebula Genomics is launching its genome sequencing service for free for people who provide certain information about themselves, the Boston Globe reports.

Shaken Identity

Genetic ancestry testing can affect a person's sense of identity, the New York Times Magazine writes.

Isolation Worries

An opinion piece at Bloomberg discusses China's stance on genomic research.

This Week in PLOS

In PLOS this week: grey wolf population genomics, mutations associated with lung adenocarcinoma survival, and more.

A Winning Diagnostic

Consulting company McKinsey says diagnostics companies will have to combine genomic data analysis, electronic medical records, effective reimbursement strategies, and regulatory compliance in order to win.

A new report has found that researchers in Africa are still heavily dependent on funding from organizations in the US, Europe, and China, Nature News says.

Not Enough Progress?

An article in The Atlantic argues that the progress being made in science isn't keeping pace with the money and time being spent on research.

This Week in Science

In Science this week: a CRISPR screen identifies sideroflexin 1 as a requisite component of one-carbon metabolism, and more.

Though many details have yet to be worked out, the draft deal for the UK's withdrawal from the EU is giving researchers some hints for what they can expect, Nature News says.

Pages

Nature News reports that doing a postdoc might not help researchers find employment.

Pennsylvania State University's Kathleen Grogan says researchers need to approach data on gender and racial diversity in the sciences like they would any other dataset.

The National Science Foundation is adding questions about sexual orientation and gender identity to its Survey of Earned Doctorates, according to Science Careers.

Nature asked scientists whether they were satisfied with their careers to find that most were, with some variation.