The Scan

This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: variants influencing Alzheimer's disease, classification framework for tropical plants, and more.

Olympic Sequencing?

Wired reports the World Anti-Doping Agency is weighing a proposal to require Olympic athletes to undergo genome sequencing.

The US National Institutes of Health has decided to discontinue PubMed Commons because of low uptake.

This Week in PLOS

In PLOS this week: ramifications of sexual recombination in bacteria, Mycobacterium leprae genome sequences, and more.

UK regulators have approved the use of mitochondrial transfer in two cases, according to the Guardian.

Bacteria In Cahoots

Two bacterial species together help feed the development of colon cancer, according to the New York Times.

A Japanese research team has found a blood test that might be able to determine whether someone has early-stage Alzheimer's disease, Scientific American reports.

This Week in Science

In Science this week: gene variant linked to inflammatory bowel disease, and more.

A Dutch famine during World War II led to life-long epigenetic changes in individuals whose mothers were pregnant with them at the time.

Marcelo Gleiser discusses our Last Universal Common Ancestor at NPR.

Technology Review reports that animals given large gene therapies doses have suffered fatal side effects.

This Week in Nature

In Nature this week: nanopore sequencing and assembly human genome, method to reduce CRISPR off-target effects, and more.

CDC Director Resigns

Brenda Fitzgerald, the director of the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, has stepped down, according to CNBC.

Faster Flu Vaccines?

Synthetic Genomics is working on speeding up flu vaccine production, according to the San Diego Union-Tribune.

For Better Eating

Bloomberg reports that many people are interested in genetic tests to refine their exercise regime and diet plan.

In Genome Research this week: guide RNAs to target KRAS mutations, modeling organ development from single cells, and more.

Arno Motulsky Dies

Arno Motulsky, a founder of both medical genetics and pharmacogenomics, has died, the New York Times reports.

A new report from the Personalized Medicine Coalition highlights new personalized medicines approvals by the US Food and Drug Administration.

Some Guarded Hope

The Deseret News reports that families with children with rare genetic diseases are cautiously optimistic about CRISPR-based gene editing as a treatment.

This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: DNA damage associated with e-cigarette exposure, inflammasome inhibition by OLT1177, and more.

Look at the Science

Female grant applicants do about as well as their male colleagues when the review focuses on the science proposed, according to Nature News.

Such Long Sequences

Researchers have used a portable nanopore sequencer to sequence and assemble a human reference genome.

The Earth BioGenome Project is joining forces with the Earth Bank of Codes, according to the Economist.

Will They Renew?

As the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine runs out of funds, NPR asks whether states will again fund stem cell research.

This Week in PLOS

In PLOS this week: metabolite profiles of typhoid fever, shifts in cell-free DNA levels following exercise, and more.

Pages

At Nature, Johns Hopkins' Gundula Bosch describes her graduate program that aims to get doctoral students thinking about the big picture.

Patricia Fara writes about childcare funding, and women in science and science history at NPR.

National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences researchers have visualized the career paths of former postdocs.

A new survey from the Pew Research Center finds that half of women working in STEM have experienced gender discrimination at work.