The Scan

This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: high-altitude adaptation signature among Tibetans, de novo mutations in early-onset high myopia, and more.

Weathers It All

Francis Collins tells CNBC that the National Institutes of Health has made it through good and bad times.

The editorial board of the New York Times laments proposed cuts to science spending in the US.

The US-based team that performed mitochondrial replacement therapy publishes its approach; editorial describes its weaknesses.

This Week in PLOS

In PLOS this week: papillary renal cell carcinoma mutations, role of microRNAs in cold- and alkaline-adapted fish, and more.

Nearly a third of studies funded by the National Institutes of Health are cited by patents, according to a new study.

A Little Lonely

President Donald Trump hasn't named science or technology advisors, worrying critics, the New York Times reports.

Patients in Australia are avoiding genetic testing because of life insurance discrimination concerns, according to the Australian Financial Review.

This Week in Science

In Science this week: sequencing study of IDH glioma origins, and more.

HHS Secretary Tom Price says the NIH budget contains unneeded expenses that can be trimmed, Stat News reports.

The chair of the House science committee says the journal Science is not objective, the Huffington Post reports.

This Week in Nature

In Nature this week: glioma GWAS uncovers new risk loci, and more.

Ivanka Trump and Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos call on girls to pursue STEM careers, the Associated Press reports.

Some science companies will be taking part in next month's March for Science, Fortune reports.

Shale oil companies are turning to DNA sequencing to find spots to drill, Reuters reports.

In Genome Research this week: longitudinal study of Burkholderia cenocepacia isolates from cystic fibrosis patients, long-read assembly approach, and more.

In Other Cuts

The White House has created a list of cuts, including to the NIH, that could be in a budget bill for this year.

Preprints OK

The US National Institutes of Health is to allow applicants to cite preprints just as they would any other research paper, ScienceInsider reports.

Two manuscript pages handwritten by Charles Darwin are going on the auction block, according to the Los Angeles Times.

This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: tool to track transcriptome-wide binding, evidence of balancing selection on behavior-linked genes, and more.

Harold Varmus, a former NIH director, says that proposed reductions to the agency's budget are worrisome.

One From Each

The Genome 10K project is to sequence about 10,000 vertebrate genomes, including ones of endangered species, Digital Trends reports.

The new Coalition to Save NIH Funding aims to educate lawmakers and the public on the significance of biomedical research.

This Week in PLOS

In PLOS this week: analysis of viral sequences from human blood samples, gut microbiomes of heart failure patients, and more.

For All the 'Mutants'

An opinion piece in the New York Times urges lawmakers to keep genetic protections in place.

Pages

Students whose classmates are interested in science are more likely to think about a career in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics, a new study says.

CNBC reports that the genetic counseling field is expected to grow as personalized medicine becomes more common.

Gladys Kong writes at Fortune that her STEM background has helped her as a CEO.

Social scientists report that the image of the 'lone scientist' might be deterring US students from STEM careers.