The Scan

Theft by Peer Review

A researcher responds to a peer reviewer who passed a manuscript off as his own work, Retraction Watch reports.

Weakened FDA

The 21st Century Cures Act changes FDA requirements for approving a drug for a new indication, Vox writes.

This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: circulating tumor cells may be useful for tracking disease, analysis of demethylation in endosperm seed tissue, and more.

Can Almost See It

Newsweek reports that cancer researchers are cautiously optimistic that they will soon be able to target mutant Ras.

Waiting to See

British and foreign researchers brace for the effects of the UK leaving the EU, the Associated Press reports.

This Week in PLOS

In PLOS this week: regulators of brown adipocyte differentiation, longevity and FOXO3 variants, and more.

NIH Director Francis Collins has selected a retired Army major general and cardiologist for the CEO spot at the agency's embattled Clinical Center.

New York officials are considering the use of a familial DNA search to get a lead on a suspect in the strangulation death of a runner.

Researchers have found a rare carbapenem resistance gene on a US pig farm, NBC News reports.

This Week in Science

In Science this week: genetic analysis of pollutant-tolerant fish, and more.

Bloomberg reports that President-elect Donald Trump is considering Jim O'Neill for Food and Drug Administration commissioner.

The US Senate has passed the 21st Century Cures Act, which would provide a funding boost at NIH while overhauling FDA policies.

KRAS in its Sights

Researchers used T-cell transfer therapy to target mutation KRAS, according to the New York Times.

This Week in Nature

In Nature this week: genome-wide transcriptome analysis of brain samples from people with autism spectrum disorder, flounder genome, and more.

Four Republican lawmakers urge President-elect Donald Trump to keep Francis Collins as NIH director, Stat News reports.

Agreement Ahead?

The final text of the bill to reauthorize the America COMPETES Act might smooth over the differences between NSF and the House science committee, ScienceInsider says.

Sequencing of a 10,000-year-old mummy leads to its repatriation to the Fallon Paiute-Shoshone Tribe, Nature News reports.

In Genome Research this week: Platinum variant catalog, algorithmic strategy for upgrading fragmented assemblies, and more.

Face of the Syndrome

A company is using facial recognition tools to identify genetic disorders from pictures, Technology Review reports.

CVs at the Ready

Canada begins its search for a chief government science advisor, Nature News reports.

In the Air

After a study finds DNA from antibiotic-resistant bacteria in Beijing smog, residents there worry, according to the New York Times.

This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: genes involved in histone deacetylation in Arabidopsis, effects of pathogenic presenilin-1 mutations, and more.

Immune Storm

Immunotherapy might treat cancer, but it also appears to come with a risk of a number of side effects, the New York Times reports.

Scientists and Stars

In a glamorous event, the Breakthrough Foundation gave out more than $25 million in prizes to researchers.

What to Eat?

Fast Company takes a look at startups in the nutrigenomic space that aim to offer personalized diet advice.

Pages

A survey of UK academics found that women tended to have higher teaching loads than men, according to Nature News.

A study appearing in PNAS finds that the mean age of the US scientific workforce is increasing.

At Science Careers, Princeton University's Julian West advises new researchers to read widely.

At Science Careers, a researcher describes how her rejuvenated postdoc science policy committee is promoting science.