The Scan

A retrovirus that's been integrated into the human genome appears to have a role in embryonic development, researchers report.

Differences in DNA methylation could be used to distinguish between DNA samples obtained from identical twins, researchers say.

This Week in PLOS

In PLOS this week: phylogenetic study of hepatitis E viruses in Swedish moose, recombination sites in the honeybee genome, and more.

A Few Snags

An Australian study of personalized medicine has run into problems as it recruits patients.

Industrial Focus

The proposed Canadian budget emphasizes partnerships with industry, Nature News reports.

The University of Arizona's Raina Maier writes that an understanding of the Earth's microbiome is needed.

This Week in Science

In Science this week: mtDNA analysis give glimpse into decline of Neanderthals in Europe, and more.

Many researchers call the work by Chinese scientists, who used the gene editing technology on human germlines, unethical, among other things. 

At Technology Review, University of California,Berkeley's Jennifer Doudna discusses the power, and possible perils, of genome editing.

Researchers say there's a genetic component behind why mosquitoes seem to like some people more than others.

This Week in Nature

In Nature this week: draft genomes of cultivated Upland cotton, and more.

In a New York Times op-ed, Eric Lander argues that forensic science needs to be of high quality.

Make It a Double

Newt Gingrich calls for a doubling of the National Institutes of Health budget.

Color Genomics, a low-cost breast cancer genetic testing company, enters the fray, while others band together to work out the meaning of variants of unknown significance.

In Genome Biology this week: investigation of host expression and microbial communities in pouchitis, liver fluke genome sequencing, and more.

Researchers plan to share Ebola and MERS viral sequence data more quickly.

Melts in Your Mouth

Penn State researchers home in on a gene linked to the melting point of chocolate.

Stanford University's Karl Deisseroth and Xiaoliang Sunney Xie from Harvard University are this year's recipients of the Albany Medical Center Prize.

This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: microbial communities of household dust, sequencing study of desiccation tolerance in the Resurrection Plant, and more.

Liquid biopsies and DNA tests may be able to tell physicians whether a cancer patient is relapsing, the New York Times reports.

FASEB says guidelines proposed by the NIH to bolster research reproducibility are premature and don't take the full range of scientific studies into consideration.

Nautilus' Alexandra Ossola examines how Tay-Sachs disease jump-started the genetic disease testing field.

This Week in PLOS

In PLOS this week: GWAS links gene to noise-induced hearing loss in mice, population genetics of malaria parasites, and more.

The World Health Organization calls for the public release of clinical trial results within a year of the completion of data collection.

Nature has retracted a 2002 epigenetics paper for image manipulation.

Pages

If you're looking to make a career change, Nature Jobs notes that's the time to refresh your soft and hard skills — strategically.

A proposed change to labor regulations has some thinking that postdocs may get overtime pay or a raise.

Thomas Magaldi, a career services administrator at the Sloan Kettering Institute, describes how he found that career path at Nature Jobs.

At Bitesize Bio, Dhivya Kumar shares tips for figuring out your post-grad school career move.