The Scan

And Gone

A start-up company aiming to match cancer patients to treatments closes after about six weeks, Stat News reports.

NPR speaks with Rep. Eddie Bernice Johnson (D-Texas) about the US House of Representatives science committee.

This Week in PLOS

In PLOS this week: somatic mutation associations unearthed in thousands of cancer exomes, pathogen detection assay, and more.

Here, Have a Test

Fortune reports that a Philadelphia-area hospital system is offering its employees free genetic testing.

Mostly Dismissed

Retraction Watch reports that a judge dismissed most of the lawsuit Ohio State University's Carlo Croce brought against the New York Times.

Illumina, SeaWorld, and others teamed up to sequence the bottlenosed dolphin, according to CBS News 8 San Diego.

This Week in Science

In Science this week: ancient genomes inform studies of human migration in the Americas, and more.

Wired writes that, after the midterms, the US House of Representatives science committee could become "pro-science."

CTE Severity Links

Researchers have linked gene variants to chronic traumatic encephalopathy severity, CBS News reports.

This Week in Nature

In Nature this week: machine learning-based method for CRISPR editing, symbiotic genes of Medicago truncatula, and more.

Choices, Not Genes

A new study finds a limited influence of genetics on human longevity, Stat News reports.

Nature News reports that four midterm candidates in the US with science backgrounds have won their elections.

New Scientist reports that researchers have tested an ALS gene therapy in a mouse model of disease.

In Genome Research this week: transcriptomic profiles of centenarians, role for PRDM9 expression in various tumor types, and more.

On the Principle

An American Cancer Society official has resigned due to concerns about partnerships with businesses with dubious health records, according to the New York Times.

Wired reports that increased diversity is needed in the Breakthrough Prizes.

National Geographic writes that some people may have a genetic predisposition to caffeine-induced jitters.

This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: drug resistance evolution in Candida in a cystic fibrosis patient, point mutation in cotton bollworm allows it to persist in "Bt" crops, and more.

OA 'Muscle'

The Wellcome Trust and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation have joined the open-access initiative Plan S, according to ScienceInsider.

Cap Proposed

Australian insurers propose a cap for insurance policies below which customers don't have to disclose adverse genetic testing results, according to the Australian.

Room for Improvement

Indiana University School of Medicine's Aaron Carroll discusses the flaws and ways to improve peer review at the New York Times.

This Week in PLOS

In PLOS this week: statistical approach for finding somatic mutation-based associations, genomic and methylomic patterns in virulent and non-virulent forms of a swine respiratory pathogen, and more.

Few Eyebrows Up

Time reports that some experts have raised concerns about 23andMe's new direct-to-consumer pharmacogenetic tests.

Not Right Now

ScienceInsider reports the National Science Foundation has stopped accepting applications for an initiative that enables fellows from its graduate fellowship program to study abroad.

This Week in Science

In Science this week: computer model uses genomic data to investigate RNA virus outbreaks, and more.

Pages

STEM professors' views on intelligence affect students' success, a new study finds.

Mental health issues are more likely to affect graduate students than other Americans, Scientific American reports.

Researchers find that younger investigators fare better when seeking support through crowdfunding sites, Nature News reports.

Nature News reports that doing a postdoc might not help researchers find employment.