The Scan | GenomeWeb

The Scan

'Repeated Violations'

A federal inspection report obtained by the Wall Street Journal describes deficiencies at Theranos' Arizona lab.

A South Carolina TV station employee gets differing results from direct-to-consumer genetic tests.

This Week in Nature

In Nature this week: quinoa reference genome described, and more.

Biotech executives argue in a letter at Nature Biotechnology that banning immigrants from the US will harm the country's biopharma industry.

The UK's Telegraph writes that gene editing is changing the drug discovery process.

Speak Up or Not?

New York University's Ivan Oransky and Johns Hopkins University's Adam Marcus discuss science and activism at the Conversation.

This Week in Cell

In Cell this week: essential genes in AML, indel hotspots affect certain genes in cancer, and more.

Just Won't Come

Some researchers plan to boycott scientific meetings in the US due to the immigration ban, ScienceInsider reports.

The Philadelphia Inquirer writes that a genetic test to gauge opioid abuse risk might not work.

A new initiative aims to educate nurses in genomics, Nursing Times reports.

This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: comparison of variants in induced pluripotent stem cells, fibroblast cultures; DNA repair in E. coli; and more.

A blog post at the Guardian says that epigenetics is coming soon to forensics.

Know What's Coming

A test to diagnose Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease is faster and spurring other protein-folding tests, NPR says.

Cave Sweet Cave

Environmental DNA sampling uncovers caves where rare blind cave salamanders live, New Scientist reports.

This Week in PLOS

In PLOS this week: gut microbial communities of Kenyan children, transcriptional patterns in model of visceral leishmaniasis infection, and more.

The Texas Board of Education has voted to alter its standards on teaching evolution, the Associated Press reports.

Discover's D-brief blog ponders the future of the Cancer Moonshot initiative.

The effectiveness of gene drives will likely be dampened by evolution, Nature News reports.

This Week in Science

In Science this week: study of rice genes and fungal disease resistance, and more.

And Closed

A familial DNA search closed a more than 40-year-old murder case, the Washington Post reports.

Mark Walport has been tapped to run UK Research and Innovation, according to ScienceInsider.

Risk of the Heart

The British Heart Foundation says many in the UK have gene variants that put them at risk of sudden death from heart attacks.

This Week in Nature

In Nature this week: genomic influence of cattle on Mongolian yaks, and more.

The Wall Street Journal reports that Rep. Tom Price, the pick to lead the Department of Health and Human Services, bought stock in a pharma firm at a special price.

Scientists are planning to march on Washington to air their concerns about the current political climate, though one researcher says it'll be counterproductive.

Pages

Bitesize Bio's Gail Seigel offers some tips on running a low-budget lab.

The GRE isn't a good predictor of graduate school performance or productivity, according to two PLOS One studies.

Bitesize Bio has some advice for scientists ready to leave their current lab behind.

A trio of editors from the Nature family of journals describes what make a peer review a good one.