The Scan

How Long Do We Have?

A blood test aims to gauge a person's life expectancy, the Guardian reports.

This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: computational approach to bring together single-cell data, systems genetic analysis of Anopheles gambiae polymorphism, and more.

University of Adelaide researchers suggest that LINE-1 transposable elements may have driven the spit between therian mammals and monotremes.

Just From Dad

Buzzfeed News reports on the case of a young girl who inherited most of her genes from just her father.

To Store It All

A startup company is trying a different approach to DNA-based data storage, Digital Trends reports.

This Week in PLOS

In PLOS this week: genetics early flowering adaptations, genetic diversity and population structure of sandflies in the Americas, and more.

Federal officials are using DNA testing to reunite migrant families separated at the southern US border, CNN reports.

Modulate the Dose

CBS New York reports that pharmacogenomic testing can explain why some patients do not get relief from certain treatments.

This Week in Science

In Science this week: pair of genomics studies on ancient animals, and more.

Check the Results

Third-party analyses of raw data from direct-to-consumer genetic testing companies may not always be right, the New York Times reports.

One woman affected by Ireland's cervical cancer scandal has settled with the Irish health service and US-based Quest Diagnostics.

Making It Routine

The Guardian reports that England's National Health Service is to offer routine genomic medicine starting in October.

This Week in Nature

In Nature this week: the koala genome, genomic analysis of fern species, and more.

For the Ferns

Researchers have sequenced two fern species for the first time and uncovered some fern-specific genes, according to Discover's D-brief blog.

In Time for the Sun

Wired examines claims that some sunscreens can repair sun-caused DNA damage.

Scientific American reports that some people's susceptibility to infectious disease could be due variants within their own genomes.

This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: analysis of ancient human parvovirus B19, Toxoplasma gondii genotypes, and more.

The University of California, Irvine, is also removing his name from its biological sciences school, according to the New York Times.

A US House of Representatives committee calls on the Foundation for the NIH and the CDC Foundation to be more transparent about their donors, Stat News says.

By examining the genomes of long-lived redwoods, conservationists hope to uncover traits of trees with the best chances of survival, CBS News reports.

This Week in PLOS

In PLOS this week: transcriptomes of chickpeas during drought, recurrent Cys2His2 zinc finger gene mutations in cancer, and more.

Tell Me, Please

A US senator has sent letters to two biotech and pharmaceutical industry groups to ask about their approaches to handling sexual harassment, according to Stat News.

Choice of Identity

Sociologists report that people select what aspects of their genetic ancestry test results they incorporate into their sense of ethnic or racial identity.

Floating, Sleepy Mice

Wired reports on a set of mice being sent to space to study their gut microbiomes and sleep cycles as part of preparations for longer space travel.

This Week in Science

In Science this week: gene expression patterns associated with severe cases of malaria, and more.

Pages

The Nature Jobs blog reports that the University of Chicago is no longer requiring graduate school applicants to submit standardized test scores.

At Nature, the University of Alberta's Devang Mehta calls on PIs to engage in conversations about racism.

A National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine report calls for changing metrics to make STEM graduate school more student-centered, according to Science.

Two postdocs and a PhD hosted a panel discussion at Memorial Sloan Kettering on career advancement in science and what researchers can expect when they leave the lab.