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Sewer Sequences

The bacteria and viruses that infect us also get passed into raw sewage, and to track disease, Eric Schadt, when he was the chief scientific officer at Pacific Biosciences, wanted to try to sequence wastewater to identify pathogens, Forbes' Matthew Herper reports.

At that time, Herper notes that the implementation was a little unwieldy: bringing samples from the San Francisco sewers back to PacBio sequencers for testing was not really workable.

Schadt, now at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine, still wants to develop a sequence-based map of pathogens, and Herper says that the small Oxford Nanopore sequencers could be the answer.

The Scan

Response Too Slow, Cautious

A new report criticizes the global response to the threat of the COVID-19 pandemic, Nature News reports.

Pushed a Bit Later

Novavax has pushed back its timeline for filing for authorization for its SARS-CoV-2 vaccine, according to Bloomberg.

AMA Announces Anti-Racism Effort

The Associated Press reports that the American Medical Association has released a plan to address systemic racism in healthcare.

Nucleic Acids Research Papers on miRMaster 2.0, MutationTaster2021, LipidSuite

In Nucleic Acids Research this week: tool to examine small non-coding RNAs, approach to predict ramifications of DNA variants, and more.