Sewer Sequences

The bacteria and viruses that infect us also get passed into raw sewage, and to track disease, Eric Schadt, when he was the chief scientific officer at Pacific Biosciences, wanted to try to sequence wastewater to identify pathogens, Forbes' Matthew Herper reports.

At that time, Herper notes that the implementation was a little unwieldy: bringing samples from the San Francisco sewers back to PacBio sequencers for testing was not really workable.

Get the full story

This story is free
for registered users

Registering provides access to this and other free content.

Register now.

Already have an account?
Login Now.

The Seattle Times writes that pharmacogenomics testing can help choose medications that may work best for people with depression.

Researchers report that deleting one gene from butterflies affects their wing coloration patterns, according to the Washington Post.

In PNAS this week: genome sequencing of weevil symbionts, retinoid X receptor deletion in lung cancer metastasis, and more.

Sequencing could help combat foodborne illnesses, according to a blog post by Food and Drug Administration officials.