It's Just Really, Really Old | GenomeWeb

Researchers have isolated DNA from a Neanderthal skeleton dating back some 130,000 to 170,000 years, as they report in the Journal of Human Evolution.

The bones were discovered in cave in southern Italy in 1993, embedded into calcite concretions and covered with coralloid formations. Still, observational analyses indicated that they were from Homo neanderthalensis, though one with some morphological differences, such as larger brow ridges.

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In Science this week: intellectual property landscape of CRISPR genome editing, and more.

A researcher has been convicted of conspiring to steal genetically engineered rice, Reuters reports.

Harvard Medical School's George Church says a woolly mammoth-elephant hybrid is only a few years away, according to the New Scientist.

Intel is ending its sponsorship of the International Science and Engineering Fair, the New York Times reports.