Chewed to Bits

Some scientists are turning to CRISPR-Cas3 rather than the more commonly known CRISPR-Cas9 gene-editing tool to tackle antibiotic resistance, according to Gizmodo.

CRISPR-Cas9 has caught numerous researchers' imagination as it can make relatively precise cuts in the genome. But CRISPR-Cas3 is a little less precise. "If CRISPR-Cas9 is a genetic scalpel, Cas3 is a chainsaw," Gizmodo writes.

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Technology Review reports that researchers in the US have used CRISPR to modify a number of human embryos.

By introducing genes from butterfly peas and Canterbury bells, researchers in Japan have developed a blue chrysanthemum, according to NPR.

Plant researchers plan to sequence some 10,000 samples that represent the major plant clades, ScienceInsider reports.

In Nature this week: a Danish reference genome, and more.