The Scan

This Week in Science

In Science this week: gut microbiome influences liver cancer growth, spread; and more.

Make Sense of It All

The Atlantic reports that genetic counselors are coping with an influx of patients seeking advice on their direct-to-consumer genetic test results.

Variations on Results

A small study finds differences between three genomic prostate cancer tests, Medscape reports.

Of Many Minds

A survey of Canadians finds them to be divided on genetically modified food, the Ottawa Citizen reports.

This Week in Nature

In Nature this week: shared genetic architecture for asthma and allergic diseases, and more.

Quickly, Quickly

Gene therapies could qualify for a faster US Food and Drug Administration approval process, according to Stat News.

Twisting the Results

Science speaks with the University of Michigan's Jedidiah Carlson, who has tracked population genetic discussions at white nationalist sites.

NPR reports that the US House of Representatives has passed a bill to enable terminally ill patients access to experimental drugs.

In Genome Research this week: inversion variants mapped in human, non-human primate genomes; transcriptome profiling of maize, sorghum; and more.

Hide, Nessie, Hide

A team of researchers plans to sample Loch Ness for environmental DNA, according to Newsweek.

US News & World Report writes that genetic testing of lung tumors can help identify treatments for patients.

Even More Variety

The New York Times writes about the appearance of mosaicism in healthy people.

This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: insecticide resistance patterns Anopheles gambiae mosquito, transcriptome patterns in Pseudomonas aeruginosa during infection, and more.

Genetic genealogy has led to an arrest in another cold case, dating back to 1987.

Magdalena Skipper, the incoming editor-in-chief of Nature, speaks with NPR's Weekend Edition Sunday.

Working With Others

Wired reports that 23andMe is trying to bolster its outside collaborations.

This Week in PLOS

In PLOS this week: mutation in second gene widens clinical symptoms of people with ADD3 mutations, comparative genomic analysis of Pseudovibrio, and more.

Family Ties

A Columbia University-led team used emergency contact information from medical records to create family trees and estimate disease heritability.

Parabon NanoLabs is partnering with law enforcement to use genetic genealogy approaches to solve cold cases, Buzzfeed News reports.

NPR says a new report recommends that former research chimpanzees should be moved to retirement sanctuaries unless that move would shorten their lives.

This Week in Science

In Science this week: ancient Southeast Asian genomes provide insight on human migration, and more.

And Aren't Vulcan

A phylogenetic analysis of green-blooded lizards find the trait likely arose more than once, Reuters reports.

To Disclose or Not

A survey of thousands of researchers explores why some share their findings prior to publication.

Short'n'Sweet

A new study finds that a shorter treatment course might work just as well as a longer one for women with early-stage HER2-positive breast cancer, NPR says.

This Week in Nature

In Nature this week: genome-wide CRISPR-Cas9 screen finds key cell surface receptor used by the chikungunya virus, and more.

Pages

Two postdocs and a PhD hosted a panel discussion at Memorial Sloan Kettering on career advancement in science and what researchers can expect when they leave the lab.

An analysis of speakers at the American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting finds that women are less likely to be invited to talk, according to the Guardian.

An analysis appearing in PeerJ finds that social media mentions of a paper may lead to increased citations.

NIH's Michael Lauer looks at the number of grants, their amount, and funding success rates at the agency for last year.