The Scan

The Associated Press reports that the US government wasted $341,000 on travel by former Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price.

Mistrust Lingers

The Wall Street Journal writes that participating in genetic research brings up the specter of past research ethics lapses for some African Americans.

Down in the Comments

Women who post YouTube science videos get more critical comments and more comments about their appearance than male video hosts, the New York Times reports.

This Week in PLOS

In PLOS this week: sequences influencing yeast prion aggregation or degradation, dengue virus genetic variants affect transmission dynamics, and more.

Quick Cell Edits

Researchers have developed a way to quickly edit white blood cells, according to the New York Times.

Truth Seekers

In a commentary at eLife, Brandeis University's Eve Marder calls on researchers to value and pursue truth.

This Week in Science

In Science this week: rice gene enables plants to grow quickly in times of flooding, and more.

Scientific American reports that environmental DNA sampling can detect invasive brown marmorated stinkbugs before they've fully invaded a farm.

Genes for Success

Education-linked genetic variants could also predict a small portion of a person's social mobility, Newsweek reports.

With recent challenges to the US Affordable Care Act, NPR looks into whether there are any ramifications for genetic privacy.

This Week in Nature

In Nature this week: genome mining uncovers natural herbicide, and more.

Some Reunifications

The Arizona Republic reports that some young migrant children are being reunited with parents who passed both a criminal background check and a DNA test.

Letting Them Know

A new report urges investigators to routinely consider returning research results to study participants, according to Stat News.

The Wellcome Trust has announced that it is starting a new program to fund risky research ideas, Science reports.

In Genome Biology this week: processing and analyzing single-cell transcriptome data, computational strategy for designing CRISRP single guide RNAs, and more.

Face for the Suspect

Newport Beach police have turned to DNA phenotyping to generate images of a suspect in a 45-year-old murder, UPI reports.

University of California, San Diego researchers have tried a CRISPR-based gene drive in mice, according to Nature News.

How Long Do We Have?

A blood test aims to gauge a person's life expectancy, the Guardian reports.

This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: computational approach to bring together single-cell data, systems genetic analysis of Anopheles gambiae polymorphism, and more.

University of Adelaide researchers suggest that LINE-1 transposable elements may have driven the spit between therian mammals and monotremes.

Just From Dad

Buzzfeed News reports on the case of a young girl who inherited most of her genes from just her father.

To Store It All

A startup company is trying a different approach to DNA-based data storage, Digital Trends reports.

This Week in PLOS

In PLOS this week: genetics early flowering adaptations, genetic diversity and population structure of sandflies in the Americas, and more.

Federal officials are using DNA testing to reunite migrant families separated at the southern US border, CNN reports.

Modulate the Dose

CBS New York reports that pharmacogenomic testing can explain why some patients do not get relief from certain treatments.

Pages

The Nature Jobs blog reports that the University of Chicago is no longer requiring graduate school applicants to submit standardized test scores.

At Nature, the University of Alberta's Devang Mehta calls on PIs to engage in conversations about racism.

A National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine report calls for changing metrics to make STEM graduate school more student-centered, according to Science.

Two postdocs and a PhD hosted a panel discussion at Memorial Sloan Kettering on career advancement in science and what researchers can expect when they leave the lab.