The Scan

Closely Intertwined

The New York Times and ProPublica look into the close relationship between a startup and Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center.

Yahoo News reports millions of dollars are being transferred from NIH, CDC, and other programs to pay for the housing of detained undocumented immigrant children.

Researchers gave a handful of octopuses MDMA to find that they too act more social on the drug, Gizmodo reports.

This Week in Science

In Science this week: in vitro generation of human reproductive cells, and more.

From Tusk to Cartel

Researchers report using genotyping to tie together illegal ivory shipments and trace them back to a handful of cartels, the New York Times reports.

Keep Them in the Know

The US National Science Foundation's new sexual harassment policy is to go into effect next month, according to Nature News.

Researchers find that historical factors influence which genes are the most highly studied, the Atlantic reports.

This Week in Nature

In Nature this week: genomic ancestry analysis of Sardinians, current noncoding mutations in colorectal cancer, and more.

In a statement, National Institutes of Health Director Francis Collins says sexual harassment is "morally indefensible" and "unacceptable."

Missing From Trials

Stat News and ProPublica report that African Americans are underrepresented in cancer clinical trials.

Octopuses might owe their intelligence to their liberal alterations to their genes, Cosmos reports.

This Week in Cell

In Cell this week: genomic analysis of abdominal aortic aneurysm, effect of probiotics on the microbiome, and more.

What You Might Learn

The UK's Human Fertility and Embryology Authority calls for consumer genetic testing companies to warn customers that testing could uncover family secrets, according to the Guardian.

In the Skin

Researchers have transplanted edited cells into mice that appear to combat cocaine addiction, New Scientist reports.

The New York Times reports that United Nations delegates have been discussing how to govern the genetic resources of the deep sea.

This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: analysis of proteolytic enzymes secreted by circulating tumor cells, phylogenetic study of Fv1 evolution, and more.

More to Go Around

Congress approved a bill Friday that would increase the US National Institutes of Health's funding by $2 billion for fiscal year 2019.

To Worry or Not?

Sarah Lawrence College's Laura Hercher warns in a New York Times op-ed that more people are going to need help figuring out what their consumer genetic testing results mean.

Call for Ban

UK's Labour Party calls for a ban on non-invasive prenatal testing for determining sex, BBC News reports.

This Week in PLOS

In PLOS this week: intra-tumor heterogeneity patterns, genomic analysis of Thoroughbred horse origins, and more.

Baselga Resigns

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center's José Baselga has resigned following revelations he did not properly disclose industry ties in research articles.

Addressing Harassment

Physicians discuss how to tackle sexual harassment in academic medicine in commentaries appearing in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Make It Free

Eleven European countries call for free access to publicly funded science, the Economist reports.

This Week in Science

In Science this week: algorithm to examine circadian expression of genes, and more.

ScienceInsider reports that universities may be worse than drug companies at reporting clinical trial results.

Pages

A new analysis finds that better grant-writing skills may help early-career researchers stay funded and stay in academia.

At Nature, a graduate student describes how to explore careers outside academia and what PhD programs can do help that search.

A new analysis of research funding finds that after receiving their first award, female researchers are just about as likely to receive additional awards as male researchers.

The Nature Jobs blog reports that the University of Chicago is no longer requiring graduate school applicants to submit standardized test scores.