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The Scan

Gene Not Present

Retraction Watch reports that a paper was pulled because it refers to a gene that doesn't exist in mice.

From the Brink?

Researchers were able to generate fertilized northern white rhinoceros eggs, according to Mashable.

Former Orig3n employees raise concerns about its testing at Bloomberg Businessweek.

In PLOS this week: microRNA expression changes in hepatocellular carcinoma, real-time PCR-based approach for diagnosing schistosomiasis, and more.

Researchers find that many cancer drugs in development don't work quite how their developers thought they did, as Discover's D-brief blog reports.

After Your Number

CBS This Morning highlights recent Medicare fraud involving offers of genetic testing.

Mariya Gabriel, a Bulgarian politician, is to be the next European Union research commissioner, according to Science.

In Science this week: a survey indicates that US adults are more likely to support the agricultural use of gene drives if they target non-native species and if they are limited, and more.

Step Closer

Peking University-led researchers edited stem cells an HIV patient was treated with in an attempt to cure disease, the Associated Press reports.

As a Guide

The Hôpitaux Universitaires Genève is to use IBM's Watson for Genomics to help guide treatment in complex cancer cases, according to Labiotech.eu.

The UK is partnering with pharmaceutical companies to sequence and analyze DNA samples from UK Biobank participants.

In Nature this week: catalog of changes associated with gene knockouts in yeast, simultaneous profiling of three-dimensional genome structure and DNA methylation in single cells, and more.

Less Concerned

Science writes that European funders are not as wary as US ones of foreign ties among researchers.

Maybe Screen for It

Biomarkers could some day be used to identify military personnel who might benefit from post-traumatic stress disorder treatment, Scientific American reports.

An analysis in JAMA Network Open examines regulatory approvals not based on randomized clinical trials.

In Genome Research this week: PeCanPIE platform for finding, annotating, and ranking pathogenic variants; commensal Escherichia coli analysis; and more.

The Albert and Mary Lasker Foundation has announced the 2019 winners of its awards.

Up in the Air

Nature News reports that Congress needs to move quickly to pass spending bills before the fiscal year ends to fund science agencies.

Spelman College receives a grant to bolster its science, technology, engineering, and mathematics programs, according to the Root.

In PNAS this week: spatial transcriptomic approach for quantifying RNA transcripts within subcellular compartments, proteomic study of dental samples from individuals who lived during Ireland's Great Famine, and more.

The Guardian writes that UK researchers are concerned that a no-deal Brexit would affect their ability to collaborate on cancer trials in the European Union.

NPR writes that three large-scale genetic research projects in the US represent different approaches to data sharing.

Janet Woodcock, the director of the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research at the US Food and Drug Administration, says changes are needed for all benefit from biomedical advances.

In PLOS this week: deletion in NME5 linked to primary ciliary dyskinesia in Alaskan Malamutes, study of rabies virus movement in Ontario, and more.

An environmental DNA analysis of Loch Ness uncovered more eel DNA than expected, the Guardian reports.

Pages

A new study finds that a positive lab environment can encourage undergraduates to continue to perform research.

A new analysis suggests non-US citizen STEM PhDs might pass up jobs at US-based startups due to visa concerns.

A UK survey of researchers who identified as LGBT+ and allies uncovered evidence of unwelcoming workplace climates in the physical sciences.

At the Guardian, the University of Edinburgh's Nikolay Ogryzko argues that universities need to better invest in postdocs' careers.