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The Scan

Nature News examines how science in the UK may fare as Boris Johnson, the next prime minister, pursues Brexit.

CNN reports that Immigration and Customs Enforcement in the US has expanded its DNA testing to seven sites along the southern border.

In PNAS this week: role for exosomes in neuronal circuit development, tuberculosis pathogen enzymes, and more.

Rolling It Back

Undoing Obamacare protections could affect people's willingness to undergo genetic testing, Sarah Lawrence College's Laura Hercher and the University of Iowa College of Law's Anya Prince write at BuzzFeed News.

US tax agency says 23andMe's genetic health test can be claimed as a medical expense for tax purposes, the Wall Street Journal reports.

The Guardian reports that some UK physicians are calling for increased regulation of direct-to-consumer genetic tests.

Two Democratic lawmakers argue at USA Today that independent science is under attack by the Trump Administration.

In PLOS this week: networks of genes co-expressed in depression, role of minichromosome maintenance genes in lung adenocarcinoma, and more.

Some More Than Others

A new analysis finds some cancers receive more nonprofit dollars than others.

Another Look

A New Zealand minister says the country's genetic modification laws need to be re-examined to help combat climate change, the New Zealand Herald reports.

An Australian mother's conviction in the deaths of her children may be re-examined after finding that two of the children carried a cardiac arrhythmia-linked gene variant.

In Science this week: comparative analysis of sex differences in mammal gene expression, and more.

And Overturned

Genetic genealogy has helped exonerate a man who has been jailed for 20 years, Agence France Presse reports.

NPR reports that many USDA researchers working at the two agencies that are relocating to the Kansas City area are declining to go.

A new report says genetically modified food might be necessary to be able to feed a planet of nearly 10 billion people, Bloomberg says.

In Nature this week: new RNA editing approach called LEAPER, draft assembly of Musa balbisiana banana genome, and more.

Out At His Firm

He Jiankui is no longer affiliated with Direct Genomics Biotechnology, the single molecule sequencing company he founded, Nikkei Asian Review reports.

Upgrade Time?

23andMe is offering early customers re-testing on newer chips for a fee, Wired reports.

Newsweek writes about the hopes for precision medicine in cancer, but also challenges getting it to patients.

In Genome Research this week: genomic architecture of glioblastoma, predictive computational approach to estimate SNP fitness, and more.

A man has confessed to the rape and murder of developmental biologist Suzanne Eaton, according to the New York Times.

Concerning Links

The Irish Times reports that US lawmakers and law enforcement agencies are concerned about ties between the US and Chinese genomics firms.

For Coverage

Parents of children with spinal muscular atrophy tell the Washington Post they are pushing to get insurance coverage of Novartis's Zolgensma.

In PNAS this week: gene mutations in individuals with syndromic craniosynostosis, putative colorectal cancer drivers, and more.

The nonprofit Biden Cancer Initiative is suspending its operations, according to the Associated Press.

Pages

A UK survey of researchers who identified as LGBT+ and allies uncovered evidence of unwelcoming workplace climates in the physical sciences.

At the Guardian, the University of Edinburgh's Nikolay Ogryzko argues that universities need to better invest in postdocs' careers.

Researchers who go persevere after an early funding setback end up with more highly cited papers later on, according to the Economist.

Nature News reports that female scientists setting up their first labs tend to have lower salaries and smaller staffs than their male peers.