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The Scan

A UK woman is suing three National Health Service Trusts for not telling her about her father's Huntington's disease diagnosis, the BBC reports.

The president of Nankai University is embroiled in a data manipulation scandal, the South China Morning Post reports.

LiveScience reports that a novel mutation in the LPL gene was uncovered in three siblings with very high triglyceride levels.

In PNAS this week: cytotoxic CD4 T cell signature in supercentenarians, evolutionary history of beetles, and more.

At Altitude

Alterations to particular gene may enable the Quechua of Peru to better tolerate high-altitude life, Ars Technica reports.

For Later in Life

Bioethicists disagree with a research team's decision to allow the return of risk results for adult-onset conditions from a newborn sequencing project, according to Reuters.

Nature News reports that additional South Korean researchers have included the names of children on scientific papers when they did not contribute to the work.

In PLOS this week: statistical approach to prioritize rare variant searches, gene expression alterations in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and more.

By studying its enamel proteome, researchers have found the ancient ape Gigantopithecus blacki belongs to a sister clade to that of orangutans.

One Year On

The University of California, Berkeley's Jennifer Doudna reflects at Science on the anniversary of the announcement of the birth of twin girls who underwent genome editing.

With BGI There

Bloomberg Businessweek discusses genomics with BGI's Wang Jian.

In Science this week: researchers find transplanting the gut microbiome in mice affects physiology, and more.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates more people get sick and die from drug-resistant germs than previously thought, the Washington Post reports.

According to the Associated Press, three universities and a healthcare institution are sharing a gift of $1 billion.

New rules seek to limit the type of scientific and medical research that can be used to guide public health regulations, the New York Times reports.

In Nature this week: FreeHi-C approach simulates Hi-C data from interacting genome fragments, and more.

So, So Many

According to Gizmodo, researchers have developed a list of a million nucleic acid-like polymers that could store genetic information.

To Share More

US National Institutes of Health has issued a new draft data-sharing policy, ScienceInsider reports.

Golden Rice Soon?

An opinion piece in the Washington Post argues that golden rice could save the sight and lives of many children.

In Cell this week: analysis of immune microenvironment in hepatocellular carcinoma, proteogenomic analysis of clear cell renal cell carcinoma, and more.

Google's Project Nightingale has collected health information on millions of Americans, according to the Wall Street Journal.

Nature News writes that women in chemistry are less likely to have their manuscripts accepted for publication.

Against the Plan

An opinion piece at The Hill criticizes the proposed plan to collect DNA samples from migrants at the US border.

In PNAS this week: tRNA fragment signature for chronic lymphocytic leukemia, genomic sites sensitive to ultraviolet radiation in melanocytes, and more.

In PLOS this week: Mycobacterium abscessus linked to gastric conditions, placental gene expression changes associated with preterm birth, and more.

Pages

A proposed rule would deem graduate students at private institutions to not be employees, which ScienceInsider reports might affect unionization efforts.

A new study finds that a positive lab environment can encourage undergraduates to continue to perform research.

A new analysis suggests non-US citizen STEM PhDs might pass up jobs at US-based startups due to visa concerns.

A UK survey of researchers who identified as LGBT+ and allies uncovered evidence of unwelcoming workplace climates in the physical sciences.