The Scan

Lost Some Value There

The Wall Street Journal reports Human Longevity's valuation has dropped by 80 percent.

Not Mentioning It

The New York Times and ProPublica say that many physicians fail to disclose their financial ties when publishing in medical journals.

Slight Budget Trim

Science reports that the US National Cancer Institute is cutting its operating budget by 5 percent.

This Week in PLOS

In PLOS this week: similar variants seen in bullbogs, people with Robinow syndrome; ApoE genotypes in African-American, Puerto Rican populations; and more.

The data generated by 100,000 Genomes Project is being housed on military servers due to attacks by hackers, Naked Security reports.

No Gene Drive Ban

Vox reports that the United Nations' Convention on Biological Diversity decided against a gene drive moratorium.

A new poll finds most US adults are not familiar with personalized medicine, according to HealthDay.

This Week in Science

In Science this week: sequencing of neuroblastomas uncovers alterations linked to prognosis, and more.

The US Department of Health and Human Services says it has not cancelled a fetal tissue contract with a University of California, San Francisco, lab, Science reports.

University College London is launching an investigation into its past ties to eugenics, according to the Guardian.

The finding could help detect autologous blood doping among athletes, Dark Daily reports.

This Week in Nature

In Nature this week: genome sequences of two giant tortoises, genome assemblies and annotations for two allotetraploid cotton species, and more.

Turns Pink

Researchers have harnessed how epigenetic reprogramming alters the genome's physicochemical properties to develop a cancer test, the Guardian reports.

The US National Institutes of Health is sending tissue chips to space to study physiological changes that astronauts undergo in microgravity.

Growing Quickly

Stat News looks into the rapid growth of China's Pharma Valley.

In Genome Research this week: a physical and genetic map of Cannabis sativa, evaluation of family- and population-based imputation tools, and more.

The World Health Organization is putting together a panel of experts to develop guidelines and standards for gene editing, according to Reuters.

Researchers have analyzed the genome of Lonesome George, the last Pinta tortoise, to find areas of selection affecting genes linked to aging and the immune system, Discover's D-brief blog says.

The Southern University of Science and Technology denies that He Jiankui, the controversial gene-editing researcher, has been detained, the South China Morning Post reports.

This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: Takayasu arteritis risk loci, gene expression-based subgroups of B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia, and more.

Aaron Klug Dies

Aaron Klug, who won the Nobel Prize for his work on creating three-dimensional images of biological molecules, has died, the New York Times reports.

New Pore and More

At a user meeting, Oxford Nanopore gave an update on what it has been working on.

Not Always Complete

NPR says a new US Government Accountability Office report criticizes the Food and Drug Administration's orphan drug program.

This Week in PLOS

In PLOS this week: nucleosome structure linked to UV-induced melanoma mutational signatures, genetic diversity and population structure in reindeer, and more.

Croce Out as Chair

Retraction Watch reports Ohio State has pushed Carlo Croce to step down as department chair.

Pages

Pennsylvania State University's Kathleen Grogan says researchers need to approach data on gender and racial diversity in the sciences like they would any other dataset.

The National Science Foundation is adding questions about sexual orientation and gender identity to its Survey of Earned Doctorates, according to Science Careers.

Nature asked scientists whether they were satisfied with their careers to find that most were, with some variation.

Gene editing is expected to give rise to new job opportunities, according to BBC Capital.