The Scan

To Know What's Wrong

A new study finds that the majority of patients at a Tijuana clinic received a diagnosis after first-line genome sequencing, the San Diego Union-Tribune reports.

Lasting Mark

Researchers may experience the effects of the government shutdown for a while, the Los Angeles Times reports.

For Fewer Mosquitos

NPR reports that researchers in Italy are testing a gene drive aimed at controlling mosquito populations.

In Genome Biology this week: post-transcriptional modification-based stratification of glioblastoma, single-cell analysis of gene expression and methylation in human iPSCs, and more.

Kelvin Droegemeier, the new science advisor, spoke at the American Association for the Advancement of Science meeting, Geekwire reports.

New results from the NASA Twins Study indicate that the immune system may rev up when in space, the Washington Post reports.

This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: whole-genome assembly for the white shark, paper-based microfluidic method for detecting the malaria parasite, and more.

WHO Panel Announced

The World Health Organization has announced the members of its gene-editing committee, according to NPR.

DARPA is working on developing algorithms that gauge the credibility of research findings, Wired reports.

The American Society of Breast Surgeons recommends all women diagnosed with breast cancer be offered genetic testing, the Washington Post says.

This Week in Science

In Science this week: comparison of modern, historical rabbit exomes uncovers parallel evolution after myxoma virus exposure; and more.

Small but Disruptive

A trio of researchers examines the effects of small and large research teams on their fields, according to the New York Times.

Business Insider reports on efforts to apply genetic engineering to cacao plants.

And Now, Science

The Huffington Post writes that with new leadership, science is coming back to the US House of Representatives science committee.

This Week in Nature

In Nature this week: genomic factors that influence glioblastoma response to anti-PD-1 therapy, sequencing test for infectious disease, and more.

A report from the Personalized Medicine Coalition finds that more than 40 percent of new drugs approved in the US in 2018 were personalized medicines.

Plan Protested

Researchers in Hungary are protesting a plan that would increase the government's influence on research funding, the Associated Press reports.

The Right Note

Genes and training appear necessary for perfect pitch, according to Cosmos.

In Nucleic Acids Research this week: microRNAs influence cell type transitions in triple-negative breast cancers, oxidative DNA damage patterns in yeast, and more.

Starting Up Again

ScienceInsider reports that some risky flu studies that came to a halt a few years back may soon resume.

On Butterfly Wings

A genetic analysis finds that three genomic regions influence mate choice in two Heliconius butterfly species, as Smithsonian magazine reports.

For Smarts?

A trio of researchers writes at Stat News that while editing embryos to improve IQ is not yet possible, there's already a way to predict which embryos might be the smartest.

This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: blood plasma lipidome analysis of Ebola patients, genome organization of the malaria-causing parasite, and more.

A commentary appearing in Nature calls for the establishment of a research policy board in the US.

Sangamo Therapeutics has announced preliminary results from its gene-editing trial, the Associated Press reports.

Pages

STEM professors' views on intelligence affect students' success, a new study finds.

Mental health issues are more likely to affect graduate students than other Americans, Scientific American reports.

Researchers find that younger investigators fare better when seeking support through crowdfunding sites, Nature News reports.

Nature News reports that doing a postdoc might not help researchers find employment.