Virginia Polytechnic Institute Team Launches Project to Develop Computer Model of RNAi | GenomeWeb

Although investigators only have a limited understanding of the exact mechanisms by which RNA interference works, a group of biochemists and computer scientists at Virginia Polytechnic Institute have begun a project to use that knowledge to develop a computational model of the RNAi process in C. elegans.

According to Richard Helm, an associate professor of biochemistry at Virginia Tech, the research project is an outgrowth of his lab’s interest in quiescence, or the ability of cells to shut down metabolically and become dormant.

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