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USPTO Publishes Three RNAi-Related Patent Applications: May 4, 2006

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Title: RNAi Modulation of RSV, PIV, and Other Respiratory Viruses and Uses Thereof

Number: 20060089324

Filed: June 14, 2005

Inventor: Sailen Barik, University of South Alabama

The invention "is based on the in vivo demonstration that RSV and PIV can be inhibited through intranasal administration of RNAi agents as well as by parenteral administration of such agents," the patent application's abstract states. "Further, it is shown that effective viral reduction can be achieved with more than one virus being treated concurrently. Based on these findings, the present invention provides general and specific compositions and methods that are useful in reducing RSV or PIV mRNA levels, RSV or PIV protein levels and viral titers in a subject, e.g., a mammal, such as a human. These findings can be applied to other respiratory viruses."


Title: RNAi Modulation of RSV, PIV, and Other Respiratory Viruses and Uses Thereof

Number: 20060089323

Filed: June 14, 2005

Inventor: Sailen Barik, University of South Alabama

According to the patent application's abstract, the invention is "based on the in vivo demonstration that RSV and PIV can be inhibited through intranasal administration of RNAi agents as well as by parenteral administration of such agents. Further, it is shown that effective viral reduction can be achieved with more than one virus being treated concurrently. Based on these findings, the present invention provides general and specific compositions and methods that are useful in reducing RSV or PIV mRNA levels, RSV or PIV protein levels and viral titers in a subject, e.g., a mammal, such as a human. These findings can be applied to other respiratory viruses."


Title: Expression System for Stem-Loop RNA Molecule Having RNAi Effect

Number: 20060088837

Filed: April 25, 2003 PCT Filed: April 25, 2003

Lead Inventor: Kazunari Taira, University of Tokyo

According to the patent application's abstract, "an RNA molecule can be efficiently transferred into cytoplasm and exert RNAi effects, by producing a stem loop RNA molecule from the DNA that encodes this RNA molecule, with the use of a tRNA promoter. Also, the RNAi effects can be exerted effectively, by introducing a cytoplasm translocation signal sequence into the DNA that encodes a stem loop RNA molecule. Moreover, the RNAi effects can be exerted effectively by transferring a transcriptional product into the cytoplasm, using a pol II-type promoter. In this case, cytotoxicity can be reduced by co-expressing a Dicer gene. Furthermore, an effective dsRNA can be constructed by treating a dsRNA or a stem loop RNA molecule with Dicer protein," the abstract states. "Knockout cells lacking a gene of interest can be conveniently constructed, using these stem-loop RNA molecule expression systems."

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