Skip to main content
Premium Trial:

Request an Annual Quote

USPTO Publishes One Patent, Seven Patent Applications Related to RNAi: Apr 17, 2008

Premium
Title: Vector Constructs
 
Number: 7,358,069
 
Filed: May 18, 2001
 
Lead Inventor: Geert Plaetinck, Devgen
 
The patent, its abstract states, claims “improved vector constructs useful in the expression of double-stranded RNA,” particularly in vitro and in vivo.
 
Specifically, the patent claims a “DNA construct that produces double-stranded RNA comprising a first promoter and a second promoter, in which the first and second promoter are in opposite orientation to each other.”
 
These promoters, the patent states, “define an inter-promoter region positioned downstream of the 3' end of the first promoter and downstream of the 3' end of the second promoter.” The DNA construct, meantime, comprises “at least one cloning site positioned in the inter-promoter region and a first transcription terminator positioned, as seen from the 3' end of the first promoter, downstream of the first promoter and downstream of the at least one cloning site, wherein the first transcription terminator is operably linked to the first promoter.”
 

 
Title: Cancer Treatment
 
Number: 20080085279
 
Filed: Dec. 22, 2005 PCT Filed: Dec. 22, 2005
 
Lead Inventor: Mark Thomas Boyd, University of Liverpool
 
The invention “relates to the inhibitors of MDM2 Binding Protein activity that may be used as medicaments,” the patent application’s abstract states. “Such medicaments may be used to prevent or treat cancers. A preferred inhibitor is an siRNA molecule that is specific for silencing MTBP expression. The invention further relates to screening methods” for identifying MTBP inhibitors that may be used to treat cancers.
 

 
Title: Duplex Oligonucleotide Complexes and Methods for Gene Silencing by RNA Interference
 
Number: 20080085869
 
Filed: Sept. 20, 2007
 
Lead Inventor: Christina Yamada, Dharmacon (Thermo Fisher Scientific)
 
The patent application, its abstract states, claims “duplex oligonucleotide complexes [that] can be administered to a cell, tissue, or organism to silence a target gene without the aid of a transfection reagent(s). The duplex oligonucleotide complexes of the disclosure include a conjugate moiety that facilitates delivery to a cell, tissue, or organism.”
 

 
Title: siRNA Targeting Phosphoinositide-3-Kinase, Class 2, Beta Polypeptide
 
Number: 20080085997
 
Filed: June 8, 2007
 
Lead Inventor: Anastasia Khvorova, Dharmacon (Thermo Fisher Scientific)
 
“Efficient sequence-specific gene silencing is possible through the use of siRNA technology,” the patent application’s abstract states. “By selecting particular siRNAs by rational design, one can maximize the generation of an effective gene-silencing reagent, as well as methods for silencing genes. Methods, compositions, and kits generated through rational design of siRNAs are disclosed including those directed to PIK3C2B.”
 

 
Title: siRNA Targeting Transient Receptor Potential Cation Channel, Subfamily V, Member 1
 
Number: 20080085998
 
Filed: Oct. 26, 2007
 
Lead Inventor: Anastasia Khvorova, Dharmacon (Thermo Fisher Scientific)
 
“Efficient sequence-specific gene silencing is possible through the use of siRNA technology,” according to the patent application’s abstract. “By selecting particular siRNAs by rational design, one can maximize the generation of an effective gene-silencing reagent, as well as methods for silencing genes. Methods, compositions, and kits generated through rational design of siRNAs are disclosed including those directed to nucleotide sequences for TRPV1.”
 

 
Title: Modulation of Gene Expression Using DNA-RNA Hybrids
 
Number: 20080085999
 
Filed: July 30, 2007
 
Lead Inventor: Todd Hauser, Oligoengine
 
The invention is “directed to novel DNA-RNA hybrids comprising either a DNA sense strand and an RNA antisense strand, or an RNA sense strand and a DNA antisense strand,” the patent application’s abstract states. “The compounds of the invention, and compositions and arrays comprising the same, may be used for a variety of purposes, including inhibiting gene expression, treating disease and infection, determining the function of genes, and identifying and validating novel drugs and their targets.”
 

 
Title: siRNA Targeting Intracellular Adhesion Molecule 1
 
Number: 20080086001
 
Filed: Oct. 26, 2007
 
Lead Inventor: Anastasia Khvorova, Dharmacon (Thermo Fisher Scientific)
 
According to the patent application’s abstract, “efficient sequence-specific gene silencing is possible through the use of siRNA technology. By selecting particular siRNAs by rational design, one can maximize the generation of an effective gene-silencing reagent, as well as methods for silencing genes. Methods, compositions, and kits generated through rational design of siRNAs are disclosed including those directed to nucleotide sequences for ICAM1.”
 

 
Title: siRNA Targeting Secreted Frizzled-Related Protein 1
 
Number: 20080086002
 
Filed: Oct. 26, 2007
 
Lead Inventor: Anastasia Khvorova, Dharmacon (Thermo Fisher Scientific)
 
“Efficient sequence-specific gene silencing is possible through the use of siRNA technology,” the patent application’s abstract states. “By selecting particular siRNAs by rational design, one can maximize the generation of an effective gene-silencing reagent, as well as methods for silencing genes. Methods, compositions, and kits generated through rational design of siRNAs are disclosed including those directed to nucleotide sequences for sFRP1.”

The Scan

Missed Early Cases

A retrospective analysis of blood samples suggests early SARS-CoV-2 infections may have been missed in the US, the New York Times reports.

Limited Journal Editor Diversity

A survey finds low diversity among scientific and medical journal editors, according to The Scientist.

How Much of a Threat?

Science writes that need for a provision aimed at shoring up genomic data security within a new US bill is being questioned.

PNAS Papers on Historic Helicobacter Spread, Brain Development, C. difficile RNAs

In PNAS this week: Helicobacter genetic diversity gives insight into human migrations, gene expression patterns of brain development, and more.