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USPTO Publishes One Patent, Nine Patent Applications Related to RNAi: Feb 21, 2008

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Title: Nanoparticle Delivery Vehicle
 
Number: 7,332,586
 
Filed: July 10, 2002
 
Lead Inventor: Stefan Franzen, North Carolina State University
 
The patent, its abstract states, claims “a nanoparticle delivery vehicle, comprising a nanoparticle, an active agent, and a nuclear localization signal, and methods of modulating gene expression and protein expression employing the nanoparticle delivery vehicle. A representative method includes providing a nanoparticle delivery vehicle comprising a nanoparticle having a diameter of about 30 nm or less, an active agent, and a nuclear localization signal; and contacting a target cell with the nanoparticle delivery vehicle, whereby an active agent is delivered to the nucleus of a target cell. Another representative method includes providing a nanoparticle delivery vehicle comprising a nanoparticle having a diameter greater than or equal to about 30 nm, an active agent, and a nuclear localization signal; and contacting a target cell with the nanoparticle delivery vehicle, whereby an active agent is delivered to the cytoplasm of a cell.”
 

 
Title: RNA Interference-Mediated Inhibition of Aurora Kinase B and its Combination as Anticancer Therapy
 
Number: 20080038189
 
Filed: June 19, 2007
 
Lead Inventor: Murali Krishna Addepalli, Reliance Life Sciences
 
“This invention relates to the use of short nucleic acid molecules that modulate Aurora-B kinase expression,” the patent application’s abstract states. “The invention includes compounds, compositions, and methods useful for the modulation of expression and activity of genes involved in the AurkB pathway. In one embodiment, the … invention provides short nucleic acid molecules, such as siRNA, which can be used in treating, preventing, or inhibiting cancer, and any other proliferative disease, trait or condition, which respond to a reduction in AurkB expression in a cell or tissue. Such short nucleic acid molecules can be used alone or in combination with other treatments or therapies, including short nucleic acid molecules that modulate expression of EGFR.”
 

 
Title: Silencing RNA Molecules and Their Use in Bone Formation
 
Number: 20080038308
 
Filed: Aug. 1, 2006
 
Lead Inventor: Stephen George Miller, Regeneration Technologies
 
The invention, the patent application’s abstract states, “is directed to siRNA molecules that down-regulate the expression of proteins that inhibit bone formation. In another aspect, the … invention is directed to compositions and/or implants comprising in combination such siRNA molecules in a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier or implant.”
 

 
Title: microRNA Inhibiting the Expression of Wt1 Gene and Utilization of the Same
 
Number: 20080038819
 
Filed: March 28, 2005 PCT Filed: March 28, 2005
 
Lead Inventor: Haruo Sugiyama, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine
 
According to the patent application’s abstract, an “miRNA that targets the vicinity of the Wt1 gene stop codon not only suppresses the expression of the Wt1 gene, but also exhibits a marked effect of suppressing cell growth in cancer cell lines.”
 

 
Title: Use of Resistin Antisense Oligonucleotides and/or siRNA Molecules in the Treatment of Rheumatoid Arthritis
 
Number: 20080039411
 
Filed: Feb. 23, 2005 PCT Filed: Feb. 23, 2005
 
Lead Inventor: Ulf Smith, Goteborg University
 
The invention, the patent application’s abstract states, “relates to the use of oligonucleotides antisense to part of the resistin gene and siRNA blocking the action of resistin for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis,” as well as to the “determination of the onset of rheumatoid arthritis.”
 

 
Title: RNA Interference-Mediated Inhibition of Gene Expression Using Multifunctional Short Interfering Nucleic Acid
 
Number: 20080039412
 
Filed: Feb. 9, 2005 PCT Filed: Feb. 9, 2005
 
Lead Inventor: Vasant Jadhav, Sirna Therapeutics (Merck)
 
The invention, according to the patent application’s abstract, comprises “methods and nucleic acid-based reagents useful in modulating gene expression in a variety of applications, including use in therapeutic, veterinary, agricultural, diagnostic, target validation, and genomic-discovery applications. Specifically, the invention relates to multifunctional short interfering nucleic acid molecules that modulate the expression of one or more genes in a biologic system, such as a cell, tissue, or organism, via RNA interference. The bi-functional short interfering nucleic acid molecules of the invention can target more than one regions of nucleic acid sequence in a single target nucleic acid molecule or can target regions of nucleic acid sequence in differing target nucleic acid molecules,” the abstract adds. The multifunctional siNA molecules “are useful in the treatment of any disease or condition that responds to modulation of gene expression or activity in a cell, tissue, or organism.”
 

 
Title: RNA Interference-Mediated Inhibition of Gene Expression Using Chemically Modified Short-Interfering Nucleic Acid
 
Number: 20080039414
 
Filed: Oct. 23, 2003
 
Lead Inventor: James McSwiggen, Sirna Therapeutics (Merck)
 
According the its abstract, the patent application claims “methods and reagents useful in modulating gene expression in a variety of applications, including use in therapeutic, diagnostic, target validation, and genomic-discovery applications. Specifically, the invention relates to synthetic chemically modified small nucleic acid molecules … capable of mediating RNA interference against target nucleic acid sequences. The small nucleic acid molecules are useful in the treatment of any disease or condition that responds to modulation of gene expression or activity in a cell, tissue, or organism.”
 

 
Title: Retrograde Transport of siRNA and Therapeutics Uses to Treat Neurologic Disorders
 
Number: 20080039415
 
Filed: Aug. 11, 2006
 
Lead Inventor: Gregory Robert Stewart, Alnylam Pharmaceuticals
 
The patent application, its abstract states, claims “methods of treating disorders affecting the central nervous system. ... More particularly, methods of treating neurological disorders are disclosed which show therapeutic or prophylactic treatment of a mammalian CNS disorder by effecting local administration of an [RNAi] agent, followed by retrograde transport of the [RNAi] agent away from the administration site and onto multiple regions within the CNS. This retrograde transport of [RNAi] results in an improved therapeutic involvement for the respective [RNAi] agent.”
 

 
Title: Method for Inhibiting NOX1 Gene Expression
 
Number: 20080039420
 
Filed: April 17, 2007
 
Lead Inventor: Agnes Juhasz, City of Hope
 
The invention “relates to compositions and methods for gene-specific inhibition of gene expression by short interfering ribonucleic acid effector molecules,” the patent application’s abstract states. “The compositions and methods are particularly useful in modulating gene expression of the NOX1 gene in colon cancer cells.”
 

 
Title: siRNA Targeting Neuropeptide Y
 
Number: 20080039617
 
Filed: July 27, 2007
 
Lead Inventor: Anastasia Khvorova, Dharmacon (Thermo Fisher Scientific)
 
“Efficient sequence specific gene silencing is possible through the use of siRNA technology,” the patent application’s abstract states. “By selecting particular siRNAs by rational design, one can maximize the generation of an effective gene silencing reagent, as well as methods for silencing genes. Methods, compositions, and kits generated through rational design of siRNAs are disclosed including those directed to NPY.”

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