Skip to main content
Premium Trial:

Request an Annual Quote

USPTO Publishes One Patent, Four Patent Applications Related to RNAi: Oct 25, 2007

Premium
Title: Treatment of Melanoma by Reduction in Clusterin Levels
 
Number: 7,285,541
 
Filed: Aug. 21, 2003
 
Lead Inventor: Martin Gleave, University of British Columbia (OncoGenex)
 
“Treatment of melanoma is achieved through reduction in the effective amount of clusterin in melanoma cells in a mammalian subject, preferably a human,” the patent’s abstract states. “A therapeutic agent effective to reduce the effective amount of clusterin in the melanoma cells is administered to the subject. The therapeutic agent may be, for example … [a] small inhibitory RNA compound targeted to clusterin. bcl-xL in a subject or cell line can also be regulated by administering to the subject or cell line an agent effective to modulate the amount of clusterin expression. In particular, in clusterin expressing cells, the expression of bcl-xL is down-regulated when the effective amount of clusterin is reduced. Such inhibition is significant because bcl-xL is known to act as an inhibitor of apoptosis.”
 

 
Title: Anti-Hyperproliferative Therapies Targeting HDGF
 
Number: 20070243191
 
Filed: Dec. 15, 2006
 
Lead Inventor: Li Mao, University of Texas
 
The invention, the patent application’s abstract states, “provides methods of cancer therapy or diagnosis involving targeting hepatoma-derived growth factor. In certain embodiments, an antibody and/or siRNA may be used to inhibit HDGF, optionally coupled to or combined with other cancer therapies.”
 

 
Title: Devices and Processes for Distribution of Genetic Material to Mammalian Limb
 
Number: 20070244067
 
Filed: March 30, 2007
 
Lead Inventor: Vladimir Budker, Mirus Bio
 
“A process is described for the delivery of a therapeutic polynucleotide to limb muscle tissue suffering from or potentially suffering from muscular dystrophy,” the patent application’s abstract states. “The polynucleotide is inserted into a mammalian limb vessel such as an artery. Delivery efficiency and distribution is enhanced by combining injection of a solution containing the polynucleotide with the use of an externally applied cuff.”
 

 
Title: siRNA Targeting Coatomer Protein Complex, Subunit Beta 2
 
Number: 20070244311
 
Filed: May 30, 2007
 
Lead Inventor: Anastasia Khvorova, Dharmacon (Thermo Fisher Scientific)
 
“Efficient sequence specific gene silencing is possible through the use of siRNA technology,” the patent application’s abstract states. “By selecting particular siRNAs by rational design, one can maximize the generation of an effective gene silencing reagent, as well as methods for silencing genes. Methods, compositions, and kits generated through rational design of siRNAs are disclosed including those directed to COPB2.”
 

 
Title: siRNA Targeting Phosphoinositide-3-Kinase, Class 2, Alpha Polypeptide
 
Number: 20070244312
 
Filed: June 8, 2007
 
Lead Inventor: Anastasia Khvorova, Dharmacon (Thermo Fisher Scientific)
 
According to the patent application’s abstract, “efficient sequence specific gene silencing is possible through the use of siRNA technology. By selecting particular siRNAs by rational design, one can maximize the generation of an effective gene silencing reagent, as well as methods for silencing genes. Methods, compositions, and kits generated through rational design of siRNAs are disclosed including those directed to PIK3C2A.”
 

The Scan

Fertility Fraud Found

Consumer genetic testing has uncovered cases of fertility fraud that are leading to lawsuits, according to USA Today.

Ties Between Vigorous Exercise, ALS in Genetically At-Risk People

Regular strenuous exercise could contribute to motor neuron disease development among those already at genetic risk, Sky News reports.

Test Warning

The Guardian writes that the US regulators have warned against using a rapid COVID-19 test that is a key part of mass testing in the UK.

Science Papers Examine Feedback Mechanism Affecting Xist, Continuous Health Monitoring for Precision Medicine

In Science this week: analysis of cis confinement of the X-inactive specific transcript, and more.