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USPTO Publishes 12 RNAi-Related Patent Applications

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Title: RNA Interference-Mediated Inhibition of Gene Expression Using Chemically Modified Short Interfering Nucleic Acid
 
Number: 20070004667
 
Filed: Aug. 11, 2006
 
Lead Inventor: James McSwiggen, Sirna Therapeutics (Merck)
 
The invention “concerns methods and reagents useful in modulating gene expression in a variety of applications, including use in therapeutic, diagnostic, target validation, and genomic discovery applications,” the patent application’s abstract states. “Specifically, the invention relates to synthetic chemically modified small nucleic acid molecules … capable of mediating RNA interference against target nucleic acid sequences. The small nucleic acid molecules are useful in the treatment of any disease or condition that responds to modulation of gene expression or activity in a cell, tissue, or organism.”
 

 
Title: RNA Interference-Mediated Inhibition of Gene Expression Using Chemically Modified Short Interfering Nucleic Acid
 
Number: 20070004665
 
Filed: Aug. 4, 2006
 
Lead Inventor: James McSwiggen, Sirna Therapeutics (Merck)
 
The invention “concerns methods and reagents useful in modulating gene expression in a variety of applications, including use in therapeutic, diagnostic, target validation, and genomic discovery applications,” the patent application’s abstract states. “Specifically, the invention relates to synthetic chemically modified small nucleic acid molecules … capable of mediating RNA interference against target nucleic acid sequences. The small nucleic acid molecules are useful in the treatment of any disease or condition that responds to modulation of gene expression or activity in a cell, tissue, or organism.”
 

 
Title: RNAi Agents for Maintenance of Stem Cells
 
Number: 20070004040
 
Filed: Jan. 4, 2006
 
Lead Inventor: Sarah Brashears
 
The invention, the patent application’s abstract states, “provides compositions and methods suitable for delivering RNAi agents against genetic targets in stem cells so as to direct cell growth and differentiation.”
 

 
Title: RNA Interference-Mediated Inhibition of Gene Expression Using Chemically Modified Short Interfering Nucleic Acid
 
Number: 20070004664
 
Filed: Aug. 4, 2006
 
Lead Inventor: James McSwiggen, Sirna Therapeutics (Merck)
 
The invention “concerns methods and reagents useful in modulating gene expression in a variety of applications, including use in therapeutic, diagnostic, target validation, and genomic discovery applications,” the patent application’s abstract states. “Specifically, the invention relates to synthetic chemically modified small nucleic acid molecules … capable of mediating RNA interference against target nucleic acid sequences. The small nucleic acid molecules are useful in the treatment of any disease or condition that responds to modulation of gene expression or activity in a cell, tissue, or organism.”
 

 
Title: RNA Sequence-Specific Mediators of RNA Interference
 
Number: 20070003963
 
Filed: June 26, 2006
 
Lead Inventor: Thomas Tuschl, Max-Planck (Alnylam Pharmaceuticals)
 
The invention “relates to a Drosophila in vitro system which was used to demonstrate that dsRNA is processed to RNA segments 21-23 nucleotides in length,” the patent application’s abstract states. “Furthermore, when these 21-23 nt fragments are purified and added back to Drosophila extracts, they mediate RNA interference in the absence of long dsRNA. Thus, these 21-23 nt fragments are the sequence-specific mediators of RNA degradation. A molecular signal, which may be their specific length, must be present in these 21-23 nt fragments to recruit cellular factors involved in RNAi,” the abstract adds. This invention “encompasses these 21-23 nt fragments and their use for specifically inactivating gene function. The use of these fragments (or chemically synthesized oligonucleotides of the same or similar nature) enables the targeting of specific mRNAs for degradation in mammalian cells, where the use of long dsRNAs to elicit RNAi is usually not practical, presumably because of the deleterious effects of the interferon response. This specific targeting of a particular gene function is useful in functional genomic and therapeutic applications,” the abstract states.
 

 
Title: RNA Interference-Mediated Inhibition of Gene Expression Using Chemically Modified Short Interfering Nucleic Acid
 
Number: 20070004663
 
Filed: Aug. 4, 2006
 
Lead Inventor: James McSwiggen, Sirna Therapeutics (Merck)
 
The invention “concerns methods and reagents useful in modulating gene expression in a variety of applications, including use in therapeutic, diagnostic, target validation, and genomic discovery applications,” the patent application’s abstract states. “Specifically, the invention relates to synthetic chemically modified small nucleic acid molecules … capable of mediating RNA interference against target nucleic acid sequences. The small nucleic acid molecules are useful in the treatment of any disease or condition that responds to modulation of gene expression or activity in a cell, tissue, or organism.”
 

 
Title: RNA Sequence-Specific Mediators of RNA Interference
 
Number: 20070003962
 
Filed: June 26, 2006
 
Lead Inventor: Thomas Tuschl, Max-Planck (Alnylam Pharmaceuticals)
 
The invention “relates to a Drosophila in vitro system which was used to demonstrate that dsRNA is processed to RNA segments 21-23 nucleotides in length,” the patent application’s abstract states. “Furthermore, when these 21-23 nt fragments are purified and added back to Drosophila extracts, they mediate RNA interference in the absence of long dsRNA. Thus, these 21-23 nt fragments are the sequence-specific mediators of RNA degradation. A molecular signal, which may be their specific length, must be present in these 21-23 nt fragments to recruit cellular factors involved in RNAi,” the abstract adds. This invention “encompasses these 21-23 nt fragments and their use for specifically inactivating gene function. The use of these fragments (or chemically synthesized oligonucleotides of the same or similar nature) enables the targeting of specific mRNAs for degradation in mammalian cells, where the use of long dsRNAs to elicit RNAi is usually not practical, presumably because of the deleterious effects of the interferon response. This specific targeting of a particular gene function is useful in functional genomic and therapeutic applications,” the abstract states.
 

 
Title: Viral and Viral-Associated miRNAs and Uses Thereof
 
Number: 20070003575
 
Filed: Aug. 28, 2006
 
Lead Inventor: Itzhak Bentwich, Rosetta Genomics
 
The patent application, its abstract states, covers “novel polynucleotides associated with viral infections. The polynucleotides are miRNAs and miRNA precursors. Related methods and compositions that can be used for diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of those medical conditions are disclosed,” the abstract adds. “Also described herein are methods that can be used to identify modulators of viral infections.”
 

 
Title: RNA Sequence-Specific Mediators of RNA Interference
 
Number: 20070003961
 
Filed: June 26, 2006
 
Lead Inventor: Thomas Tuschl, Max-Planck (Alnylam Pharmaceuticals)
 
The invention “relates to a Drosophila in vitro system which was used to demonstrate that dsRNA is processed to RNA segments 21-23 nucleotides in length,” the patent application’s abstract states. “Furthermore, when these 21-23 nt fragments are purified and added back to Drosophila extracts, they mediate RNA interference in the absence of long dsRNA. Thus, these 21-23 nt fragments are the sequence-specific mediators of RNA degradation. A molecular signal, which may be their specific length, must be present in these 21-23 nt fragments to recruit cellular factors involved in RNAi,” the abstract adds. This invention “encompasses these 21-23 nt fragments and their use for specifically inactivating gene function. The use of these fragments (or chemically synthesized oligonucleotides of the same or similar nature) enables the targeting of specific mRNAs for degradation in mammalian cells, where the use of long dsRNAs to elicit RNAi is usually not practical, presumably because of the deleterious effects of the interferon response. This specific targeting of a particular gene function is useful in functional genomic and therapeutic applications,” the abstract states.
 

 
Title: RNA Sequence-Specific Mediators of RNA Interference
 
Number: 20070003960
 
Filed: June 26, 2006
 
Lead Inventor: Thomas Tuschl, Max-Planck (Alnylam Pharmaceuticals)
 
The invention “relates to a Drosophila in vitro system which was used to demonstrate that dsRNA is processed to RNA segments 21-23 nucleotides in length,” the patent application’s abstract states. “Furthermore, when these 21-23 nt fragments are purified and added back to Drosophila extracts, they mediate RNA interference in the absence of long dsRNA. Thus, these 21-23 nt fragments are the sequence-specific mediators of RNA degradation. A molecular signal, which may be their specific length, must be present in these 21-23 nt fragments to recruit cellular factors involved in RNAi,” the abstract adds. This invention “encompasses these 21-23 nt fragments and their use for specifically inactivating gene function. The use of these fragments (or chemically synthesized oligonucleotides of the same or similar nature) enables the targeting of specific mRNAs for degradation in mammalian cells, where the use of long dsRNAs to elicit RNAi is usually not practical, presumably because of the deleterious effects of the interferon response. This specific targeting of a particular gene function is useful in functional genomic and therapeutic applications,” the abstract states.
 

 
Title: Compositions and Methods for siRNA Inhibition of Angiogenesis
 
Number: 20070003523
 
Filed: June 8, 2006
 
Lead Inventor: Michael Tolentino, University of Pennsylvania (Acuity Pharmaceuticals)
 
According to the patent application’s abstract, the invention covers “RNA interference using small interfering RNAs, which are specific for the vascular endothelial growth factor gene and the VEGF receptor genes Flt-1 and Flk-1/KDR [and] inhibit expression of these genes. Diseases which involve angiogenesis stimulated by overexpression of VEGF, such as diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration, and many types of cancer, can be treated by administering the small interfering RNAs.”
 

 
Title: Targets for Tumor Growth Inhibition
 
Number: 20070003519
 
Filed: April 1, 2004 PCT Filed: April 1, 2004
 
Lead Inventor: Patrick Lu, Intradigm
 
The invention, the patent application’s abstract states, “relates to methods for treating cancers by manipulating a target gene expression by up-regulation, silencing, and/or down-regulation of the gene, such as EGFR-RP, TRA1, MFGE8, TNFSF13 and ZFP236, respectively. The methods are useful in treating cancers and/or inhibiting tumor growth by enhancing expression of a gene that is validated as a target such as ICT1030, for protein, peptide drug and gene therapy modalities; or by RNA interference to silence and/or down-regulate targets such as ICT1024, ICT1025 and ICT1031 and ICB1003 that are validated for antibody, small molecule, and other inhibitor drug modalities.”