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SuperArray Bioscience s siRNA Array Plates and SureSilencing siRNA and Antibody Kits, and Ambion s Silencer Phosphodiesterase siRNA Library

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SuperArray Bioscience said this week that it has launched its siRNA Array plates, an RNAi research tool that includes validated siRNAs for six pathway-specific genes on a single 6-well plate and a reverse-transfection agent.

The company said gene knockdown in cultured, adherent cells takes about 15 minutes, adding that positive and negative controls are also included on separate control plates.

According to SuperArray, the six siRNAs on each plate have been proven to decrease target mRNA levels by more than 70 percent. The first three siRNA Array Plates available are specific for Human Caspase, Human NFkB I and Human Cell Cycle I.

Additional siRNA Array Plates, targeting other pathways, will be released shortly, SuperArray said.

Details about the plates can be found at http://www.superarray.com/RNAiArrayPlate.php.

SuperArray also recently introduced its SureSilencing siRNA and antibody kits, which include validated individual gene-specific siRNA populations and protein-specific antibodies, said the company.

Details about these kits can be found at http://www.superarray.com/siRNA_Ab.php.


Ambion recently launched the Silencer phosphodiesterase siRNA library, a collection of siRNAs that target 36 human phosphodiesterase gene targets.

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