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Rosetta Genomics, Prime Health Reach Deal for Coverage of MiRview Mets2 Assay

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – Rosetta Genomics today announced a credentialing agreement with managed care firm Prime Health Services to cover Rosetta's miRview mets2 test.

The deal is the first between Rosetta and a US preferred provider organization, Rosetta said. As a result, the number of covered lives having access to miRview mets2 as an in-network service totals more than 6.5 million.

The miRview mets2 assay is a microRNA-based assay for identifying the tumor of origin in cancers of unknown or uncertain primary.

Kenneth Berlin, president and CEO of Rehovot, Israel-based Rosetta, said that partnering with firms such as Brentwood, Tenn.-based Prime Health allows for faster adjudication for miRview mets2 as in network, provides for faster payment, and maintains "an acceptable level of reimbursement" while reducing costs associated with appeals of denials.

"This has become increasingly important to us as we continue to see an increasing number of samples being processed and billed in our CLIA lab," Berlin said.

Financial and other terms of the deal were not disclosed.

In afternoon trading, shares of Rosetta on the Nasdaq were up 11 percent to $3.77.

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