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Rosetta Genomics, Palacky University Partner on Thyroid Cancer Dx

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) — Rosetta Genomics said today that it is collaborating with the Institute of Molecular Translational Medicine (IMTM) at Palacky University in the Czech Republic to validate and develop a new thyroid cancer diagnostic tool.

Under the agreement, Rosetta and IMTM will work toward improving the diagnosis of malignant tumors in suspected thyroid cancer patients by connecting expertise and clinical samples at IMTM with Rosetta's microRNA platform technology and product development expertise.

"Our initial studies have demonstrated that microRNA expression levels can differentiate malignant nodules from benign nodules, and also demonstrated the ability to extract and profile microRNAs from thyroid FNAs," Rosetta President and CEO Kenneth Berlin said in a statement. "The access to IMTM's thyroid cancer samples and translation research should enhance and accelerate the larger validating studies we have underway, as we plan for a third quarter 2015 launch of our thyroid assay in the US."

The partnership is being facilitated by the European Infrastructure for Translational Medicine (EATRIS), a recently established business model designed to bring together industry and academia. EATRIS comprises leading academic groups and institutions in eight countries that provide access to translational research infrastructure and expertise.

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