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People in the News: Paul Grint, Jennifer Doudna, Emmanuelle Charpentier

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Regulus Therapeutics has appointed Paul Grint as its chief medical officer.

Grint joins the company from Cerexa, a subsidiary of Forest Laboratories, where he served as president and was responsible for the company's anti-infective product pipeline. Before that, he was senior vice president of research at Forest Research Institute.


Johnson & Johnson has announced that University of California, Berkeley's Jennifer Doudna and Hannover Medical School's Emmanuelle Charpentier have been named the winners of this year's Dr. Paul Janssen Award for Biomedical Research.

Doudna and Charpentier received the award for their groundbreaking research into CRISPR-Cas9, a bacterial immunity mechanism in which a short strand of RNA guides a nuclease to a specific area of DNA where it triggers double-strand breaks. The technology has since been refined and adopted by researchers for gene-editing applications.

The Scan

Team Tracks Down Potential Blood Plasma Markers Linked to Heart Failure in Atrial Fibrillation Patients

Researchers in BMC Genomics found 10 differentially expressed proteins or metabolites that marked atrial fibrillation with heart failure cases.

Study Points to Synonymous Mutation Effects on E. Coli Enzyme Activity

Researchers in Nature Chemistry saw signs of enzyme activity shifts in the presence of synonymous mutations in a multiscale modeling analysis of three Escherichia coli genes.

Team Outlines Paternal Sample-Free Single-Gene Approach for Non-Invasive Prenatal Screening

With data for nearly 9,200 pregnant individuals, researchers in Genetics in Medicine demonstrate the feasibility of their carrier screening and reflex single-gene non-invasive prenatal screening approach.

Germline-Targeting HIV Vaccine Shows Promise in Phase I Trial

A National Institutes of Health-led team reports in Science that a broadly neutralizing antibody HIV vaccine induced bnAb precursors in 97 percent of those given the vaccine.