By Doug Macron

Although diagnostics based on microRNAs obtained from tissue samples have begun to gain traction in the marketplace, many see even greater value in the possibility that the small, non-coding RNAs can be obtained from biofluids for such tests.

To help advance work in this area, the National Institutes of Health recently awarded nearly $500,000 in grant funding to three researchers exploring the use of blood-based miRNAs as cancer biomarkers.

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Sep
10
Sponsored by
Qiagen

In this online seminar, Jo Vandesompele of the Center for Medical Genetics at Ghent University will discuss methods for improving the analysis of microRNA expression from a range of samples.