In January, researchers from the labs of Massachusetts Institute of Technology professors David Bartel and Chris Burge published data in Cell indicating that up to a third of the human genome may be regulated by microRNAs.

Now, according to a report in the Nov. 24 online edition of Science, the labs have found that a majority of mammalian genes, while not directly regulated by miRNAs, appear to be nonetheless influenced by the small non-coding RNAs.

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A new study finds that a placental protein linked with preeclampsia can be targeted by RNA silencing, according to the New Scientist.

A settlement is expected in a Duke University lawsuit hinging on using falsified data to win grants, Retraction Watch and Science report.

In PNAS this week: approach for analyzing the expression of endogenous retroviruses, circular RNAs that influence host-virus interactions, and more.

A phylogenetic analysis finds that the rare hemimastigotes form their own supra-kingdom, CBC reports.

Dec
03
Sponsored by
Advanced Cell Diagnostics

This webinar will demonstrate how a research team at the National Institutes of Health evaluated a novel in situ hybridization approach and applied it to study splice variants related to schizophrenia.

Dec
04
Sponsored by
Sophia Genetics

This webinar will discuss the use of clinical-grade exome analysis application in complex case investigations.