Researchers from Isis Pharmaceuticals last month published new data demonstrating that unformulated single-stranded antisense oligos can trigger an RNAi effect and the subsequent down-regulation of target genes in animals, including a mouse model of Huntington's disease, in a variety of tissues.
 
The findings, which appeared in two separate papers in Cell, suggest that these so-called single-stranded siRNAs, or ss-siRNAs, have therapeutic potential, according to Isis Chairman and CEO Stanley Crooke, who was also a co-author of both studies.

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Direct-to-consumer genetic testing companies have offered to test families separated at the southern US border, but that raises ethical issues.

CNBC reports that confirming a positive result from 23andMe's BRCA health report can be expensive.

The New York Times reports on a project to develop a tree DNA database to uncover illegal logging.

In PLOS this week: links between gut microbiome and colorectal cancer mutations, targeted sequencing uncovers genetic susceptibilities to epilepsy in Koreans, and more.

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