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IP Update: Feb 25, 2010

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Title: siRNA Targeting Connective Tissue Growth Factor

Patent Number: 7,666,853

Filed: Jan. 23, 2009

Lead Inventor: Anastasia Khvorova, Dharmacon (Thermo Fisher Scientific)

"Efficient sequence-specific gene silencing is possible through the use of siRNA technology," the patent's abstract states. "By selecting particular siRNAs by rational design, one can maximize the generation of an effective gene-silencing reagent, as well as methods for silencing genes. Methods, compositions, and kits generated through rational design of siRNAs are disclosed including those directed to CTGF."


Title: Compositions and Methods for Angiogenesis-Related Molecules and Treatments

Patent Number: 7,667,028

Filed: Aug. 9, 2005 PCT Filed: Aug. 9, 2005

Lead Inventor: Gabriel Kremmidiotis, Bionomics

The invention, the patent's abstract states, comprises "short interfering RNA molecules [that] modulate the expression of an angiogenesis-related gene by RNA interference … [as well as] short hairpin RNA molecules comprising said siRNA molecules.

"These molecules can target all, or specific, isoforms of the gene," the abstract notes. The patent further claims the "use of these molecules and of isoforms of the gene for the treatment and diagnosis of angiogenesis-related disorders."


Title: RNA Interference-Mediated Inhibition of Checkpoint Kinase-1 Gene Expression Using Short Interfering Nucleic Acid

Patent Number: 7,667,029

Filed: Sept. 3, 2008

Lead Inventor: James McSwiggen, Sirna Therapeutics (Merck)

"This invention relates to compounds, compositions, and methods useful for modulating checkpoint kinase gene expression using short interfering nucleic acid molecules," the patent's abstract states. "This invention also relates to compounds, compositions, and methods useful for modulating the expression and activity of other genes involved in pathways of checkpoint kinase gene expression and/or activity by RNA interference using small nucleic acid molecules."


Title: RNA Interference-Mediated Inhibition of Matrix Metalloproteinase 13 Gene Expression Using Short Interference Nucleic Acid

Patent Number: 7,667,030

Filed: Sept. 4, 2008

Lead Inventor: James McSwiggen, Sirna Therapeutics (Merck)

"This invention relates to compounds, compositions, and methods useful for modulating matrix metalloproteinase gene expression using short interfering nucleic acid molecules," according to the patent's abstract. "This invention also relates to compounds, compositions, and methods useful for modulating the expression and activity of other genes involved in pathways of MMP13 gene expression and/or activity by RNA interference using small nucleic acid molecules."


Title: Composition for Targeted Drug Delivery and Controlled Release

Application Number: 20100040549

Filed: Jan. 4, 2008 PCT Filed: Jan. 4, 2008

Lead Inventor: Nancy Halas, Rice University

The invention, the patent application's abstract states, comprises "novel targeted drug-delivery and controlled-release methods and compositions where optically absorbing nanoparticles, such as nanoshells, are functionalized on their surfaces with thermolabile molecules that bind the drug molecules to be delivered. The linkage between the thermolabile moiety on the nanoparticles and the drug is deliberately designed or selected to be temperature sensitive, so that upon illumination of the nanoparticle at a wavelength of light, the drug molecules on the nanoparticles will be released.

"Targeting molecules, such as antibodies, aptamers or other molecules like folic acid, can be concurrently bound to the nanoparticle surface to deliver the nanoparticle to specifically targeted cells or tissues prior to the photothermally induced drug release," the abstract adds. "In this way, the nanoparticles can be advantageously concentrated on the target prior to illumination, which makes the disclosed compositions both a targeted-delivery and a controllable drug-release vehicle."


Title: Efficient Reduction of Target RNAs by Single- and Double-Stranded Oligomeric Compounds

Application Number: 20100041047

Filed: July 29, 2009

Lead Inventor: Timothy Vickers, Isis Pharmaceuticals

The invention, the patent application's abstract states, "provides, inter alia, methods of selecting … single-stranded oligomeric compounds for inhibiting RNA expression, methods of generating double-stranded oligomeric compounds, methods of identifying optimized double-stranded oligomeric compounds, methods of selecting optimized single-stranded oligomeric compounds, methods of selecting optimized double-stranded oligomeric compounds, methods of identifying multifunctional oligomeric compounds, methods for optimizing target region selection for modulation of RNA expression, methods of optimizing expression modulation of RNA, and the like."

The invention also comprises "oligomeric compounds, [eight to 80] nucleobases in length, targeted to a target RNA, wherein said oligomeric compound hybridizes to said target RNA and inhibits RNA levels by at least 50 [percent] in both single-stranded and double-stranded forms, and multifunctional oligomeric compounds," it adds.


Title: Nucleic Acid Compound for Inhibiting BCL2 Gene Expression and Uses Thereof

Application Number: 20100041140

Filed: Feb. 29, 2008 PCT Filed: Feb. 29, 2008

Lead Inventor: Steven Quay, MDRNA

The patent application, its abstract states, claims "meroduplex ribonucleic acid molecules capable of decreasing or silencing BCL2 gene expression. An mdRNA of this disclosure comprises at least three strands that combine to form at least two non-overlapping double-stranded regions separated by a nick or gap wherein one strand is complementary to a BCL2 mRNA. In addition, the meroduplex may have at least one uridine [that] is a 5-methyluridine, a nucleoside [that] is a locked nucleic acid, or optionally other modifications, and any combination thereof. Also provided are methods of decreasing expression of a BCL2 gene in a cell or in a subject to treat a BCL2-related disease."


Title: Novel RNAi Therapeutic for Treatment of Hepatitis C Infection

Application Number: 20100041733

Filed: July 3, 2008

Inventor: Hengli Tang, Florida State University

The invention, the patent application's abstract states, comprises "small interfering RNAs or small hairpin RNA and compositions comprising same … that specifically target human cyclophilin A to effectively inhibit hepatitis C infection in a cell. Such siRNA and shRNAs may have a length of from about 19 to about 29 contiguous nucleotides corresponding to a specific region of human cyclophilin A cDNA of from about nucleotide 155 to about nucleotide 183 having particular potency against CyPA and HCV.

"Such siRNA and shRNAs may be formulated as naked compositions or as pharmaceutical compositions," the abstract notes. "DNA polynucleotides, plasmids, and viral or non-viral vectors are also provided that encode siRNA or shRNA molecules, which may be delivered directly to cells or in combination with known delivery agents, such as lipids, polymers, [or] encapsulated lipid particles, such as liposomes. Methods for treating, managing inhibiting, preventing, etc., HCV infection using such siRNA and shRNAs and compositions comprising same are also provided."


Title:Gene Vector

Application Number: 20100041737

Filed: May 26, 2006 PCT Filed: May 26, 2006

Lead Inventor: Luigi Naldini, Fondazione Centro San Raffaele Del Monte Tabor

The invention, the patent application's abstract states, relates to a "gene vector comprising a miRNA sequence target."

The Scan

Driving Malaria-Carrying Mosquitoes Down

Researchers from the UK and Italy have tested a gene drive for mosquitoes to limit the spread of malaria, NPR reports.

Office Space to Lab Space

The New York Times writes that some empty office spaces are transforming into lab spaces.

Prion Pause to Investigate

Science reports that a moratorium on prion research has been imposed at French public research institutions.

Genome Research Papers on Gut Microbe Antibiotic Response, Single-Cell RNA-Seq Clues to Metabolism, More

In Genome Research this week: gut microbial response to antibiotic treatment, approach to gauge metabolic features from single-cell RNA sequencing, and more.