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IP Update: Dec 10, 2009

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Title: Oligoribonucleotides and Ribonucleases for Cleaving RNA

Patent Number: 7,629,321

Filed: Oct. 25, 2002

Inventor: Stanley Crooke, Isis Pharmaceuticals

The patent, its abstract states, claims "oligomeric compounds including oligoribonucleotides and oligoribonucleosides … [with] subsequences of 2'-pentoribofuranosyl nucleosides that activate dsRNase. The oligoribonucleotides and oligoribonucleosides can include substituent groups for increasing binding affinity to complementary nucleic acid strand as well as substituent groups for increasing nuclease resistance. The oligomeric compounds are useful for diagnostics and other research purposes, for modulating the expression of a protein in organisms, and for the diagnosis, detection, and treatment of other conditions susceptible to oligonucleotide therapeutics.

"Also included in the invention are mammalian ribonucleases, i.e., enzymes that degrade RNA, and substrates for such ribonucleases," the abstract adds. "Such a ribonuclease is referred to herein as a dsRNase, wherein 'ds' indicates the RNase's specificity for certain double-stranded RNA substrates. The artificial substrates for the dsRNases described herein are useful in preparing affinity matrices for purifying mammalian ribonuclease, as well as non-degradative RNA-binding proteins."


Title: Oligomeric Compounds and Compositions for Use in Modulation of Small Non-Coding RNAs

Application Number: 20090298174

Filed: Dec. 30, 2008

Lead Inventor: Christine Esau, Regulus Therapeutics

The invention, the patent application's abstract states, comprises "compounds, compositions, and methods … for modulating the expression and function of small non-coding RNAs. The compositions comprise oligomeric compounds, targeted to small non-coding RNAs. Methods of using these compounds for modulation of small non-coding RNAs, as well as downstream targets of these RNAs, and for diagnosis and treatment of disease associated with small non-coding RNAs, are also provided."


Title: siRNA Targeting KRAS

Application Number: 20090298176

Filed: July 6, 2009

Lead Inventor: Anastasia Khvorova, Dharmacon (Thermo Fisher Scientific)

"Efficient sequence-specific gene silencing is possible through the use of siRNA technology," the patent application's abstract states. "By selecting particular siRNAs directed to silencing KRAS, one can maximize the generation of an effective gene-silencing reagent, as well as methods for silencing genes."


Title: Novel Nucleotide Sequences

Application Number: 20090298740

Filed: March 2, 2006 PCT Filed: March 2, 2006

Inventor: Anil Kumar, National Institute of Immunology (India)

The invention, the patent application's abstract states, "relates to the field of cancer therapy. More specifically, the invention relates to use of certain nucleotide sequences for the treatment of cancer."

The application specifically claims the use of an siRNA to inhibit the production of a specific protein.


Title: dsRNA as Insect-Control Agent

Application Number: 20090298787

Filed: Jan. 12, 2007 PCT Filed: Jan. 12, 2007

Lead Inventor: Romaan Raemaekers, Devgen

The invention "relates to methods for controlling pest infestation using [double-stranded] RNA molecules," according to the patent application's abstract. "The invention provides methods for making transgenic plants that express the double-stranded RNA molecules, as well as pesticidal agents and commodity products produced by the inventive plants."


Title: Multiple RNA Polymerase III Promoter-Expression Constructs

Application Number: 20090298909

Filed: Aug. 23, 2005 PCT Filed: Aug. 23, 2005

Lead Inventor: Catherine Pachuk, Nucleonics (Alnylam Pharmaceuticals)

The invention, the patent application's abstract states, relates to "expression constructs comprising at least two different RNA polymerase III promoters, wherein each promoter is operably linked to a nucleic acid sequence encoding an RNA effector molecule. … Further provided are expression constructs comprising multiple polymerase III promoters operably linked to sequences encoding short hairpin RNA molecules, which may comprise single and/or multiple fingers. The provided constructs are useful for in vivo delivery of RNA molecules effective in gene silencing, including of viral genes including HBV and HCV."


Title: siRNA Having Antiviral Activity Against Non-Polio Enterovirus

Application Number: 20090298911

Filed: May 30, 2006 PCT Filed: May 30, 2006

Lead Inventor: Heuiran Lee, University of Ulsan

The invention "relates to an siRNA having antiviral activity against non-polio enteroviruses and a pharmaceutical composition comprising same as an active ingredient for preventing and treating diseases caused by non-polio enterovirus infection," the patent application's abstract states.


Title: Small Interfering Oligonucleotides Comprising Arabinose-Modified Nucleotides

Application Number: 20090298913

Filed: Oct. 26, 2006 PCT Filed: Oct. 26, 2006

Lead Inventor: Masad Damha, Topigen Pharmaceuticals

The patent application, its abstract states, claims "small interfering ribonucleic acid duplexes that inhibit gene expression containing at least one arabinose-modified nucleotide. … Preferably, the duplexes contain ribonucleotides [and] at least one arabinose-modified nucleotide is 2'-deoxy-2'-fluoroarabinonucleotide nucleotide."


Title: RNA Interference-Mediated Inhibition of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Virus Gene Expression Using Short Interfering Nucleic Acid

Application Number: 20090298914

Filed: Nov. 17, 2008

Inventor: James McSwiggen, Sirna Therapeutics (Merck)

The invention "comprises compounds, compositions, and methods useful for modulating the expression of genes associated with respiratory and pulmonary disease, such as severe acute respiratory syndrome virus genes, using short interfering nucleic acid molecules," the patent application's abstract states. "This invention also comprises compounds, compositions, and methods useful for modulating the expression and activity of SARS virus genes or other genes involved in pathways of SARS virus gene expression, and/or activity by RNA interference using small nucleic acid molecules."


Title: RNA Interference-Mediated Inhibition of Interleukin Gene Expression Using Short Interfering Nucleic Acid

Application Number: 20090299045

Filed: May 31, 2007

Lead Inventor: Ivan Richards, Sirna Therapeutics (Merck)

"This invention relates to compounds, compositions, and methods useful for modulating interleukin and/or interleukin receptor gene expression using short interfering nucleic acid molecules," the patent application's abstract states. "This invention also relates to compounds, compositions, and methods useful for modulating the expression and activity of other genes involved in pathways of interleukin and/or interleukin receptor gene expression and/or activity by RNA interference using small nucleic acid molecules. … Such small nucleic acid molecules are useful, for example, for treating, preventing, inhibiting, or reducing cancer, inflammatory, respiratory, autoimmune, cardiovascular, neurological, and/or proliferative diseases, disorders, or conditions in a subject or organism, and for any other disease, trait, or condition that is related to or will respond to the levels of interleukin and/or interleukin receptor in a cell or tissue, alone or in combination with other treatments or therapies."


Title: Endogenous Regulator of RNA Silencing in Plants

Application Number: 20090300792

Filed: June 2, 2005 PCT Filed: June 2, 2005

Lead Inventor: Vicki Bowman Vance, University of South Carolina

The patent application, its abstract states, claims "compositions and methods [that] use RAV proteins and genes that encode such proteins to regulate RNA silencing in plant cells. Novel ntRAV proteins and genes are also described."

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