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Five RNAi-Related Patent Applications Published by the USPTO: Nov 11, 2005

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Title: Functional and Hyperfunctional siRNA

Number: 20050246794

Filed: April 7, 2005

Lead Inventor: Anastasia Khvorova, Dharmacon

According to the patent application's abstract, "efficient sequence specific gene silencing is possible through the use of siRNA technology. By selecting particular siRNAs by rationale design, one can maximize the generation of an effective gene silencing reagent, as well as methods for silencing genes."


Title: Functional and Hyperfunctional siRNA Directed Against Bcl-2

Number: 20050245475

Filed: March 18, 2005

Lead Inventor: Anastasia Khvorova, Dharmacon

"Efficient sequence specific gene silencing is possible through the use of siRNA technology," the patent application's abstract states. "By selecting particular siRNAs by rationale design, one can maximize the generation of an effective gene silencing reagent, as well as methods for silencing genes."


Title: Double-Stranded Constructs Comprising One or More Short Strands Hybridized to a Longer Strand

Number: 20050245474

Filed: March 4, 2005

Lead Inventor: Brenda Baker, Isis Pharmaceuticals

"The … invention provides compositions comprising an antisense oligomeric compound hybridized to at least one shorter sense oligomeric compound," the patent application's abstract states. "The sense oligomeric compounds can be covalently linked to the antisense oligomeric compounds. At least a portion of the antisense oligomeric compound is complementary to and hybridizes with a nucleic acid target. Methods for modulating gene expression are also provided using the compositions of the … invention," the abstract adds.


Title: Engineered RNAi Adenovirus Silencing Expression (Erase) of DNA Repair Proteins

Number: 20050245472

Filed: May 5 2005 PCT Filed: Nov. 12, 2003

Lead Inventor: Theodore DeWeese, Johns Hopkins University

"The … invention relates to compositions and methods for killing cancer cells and treating subjects having cancer comprising administering small inhibitory RNAs (siRNA) specific for DNA repair proteins in conjunction with administration of conventional DNA-damaging agents such as radiation and chemotherapeutic agents," the patent application's abstract states.


Title: Methods and Compositions for the Specific Inhibition of Gene Expression by Double-Stranded RNA

Number: 20050244858

Filed: March 15, 2005

Lead Inventor: John Rossi, City of Hope (Integrated DNA Technologies)

"The invention is directed to compositions and methods for selectively reducing the expression of a gene product from a desired target gene in a cell, as well as for treating diseases caused by the expression of the gene," the patent application's abstract states. "More particularly, the invention is directed to compositions that contain double-stranded RNA, and methods for preparing them, that are capable of reducing the expression of target genes in eukaryotic cells. The dsRNA has a first oligonucleotide sequence that is between 25 and about 30 nucleotides in length and a second oligonucleotide sequence that anneals to the first sequence under biological conditions. In addition, a region of one of the sequences of the dsRNA having a sequence length of at least 19 nucleotides is sufficiently complementary to a nucleotide sequence of the RNA produced from the target gene to trigger the destruction of the target RNA by the RNAi machinery."

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