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Five New RNAi-Related Patent Applications Published By US Patent Office

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Title: Compositions and Methods for Controlling Parasitic Nematodes. Number: 20040098761. Filed: July 9, 2003. Lead Inventor: Harold Trick, Kansas State University.

According to the patent application’s abstract, the invention “relates to compositions and methods for controlling nematode infestation of plants or animals. In particular, the present invention provides vectors comprising sequences designed to control nematodes by RNA interference and transgenic plants transformed with such vectors.”

The application specifically claims a transgenic plant “comprising heterologous nucleic acid sequences encoding a double-stranded nematode RNA sequence, wherein said double-stranded RNA sequence inhibits the proliferation of nematodes ingesting said double-stranded nematode RNA sequence.”


Title: Compositions, Organisms, and Methodologies Employing a Novel Human Kinase. Number: 20040096890. Filed: Oct. 10, 2003. Lead Inventor: Wei Liu, Wyeth.

The patent application, its abstract states, covers “compositions, organisms, and methodologies employing a novel human protein kinase, NRHK1.

“The novel protein kinase is encoded by a human gene comprising 21 exons,” the abstract notes. “The human gene is localized in or near the 9q34 locus on human chromosome 9. The sequence similarity between the novel human protein and the consensus sequence of NIMA-related kinase indicates that the novel human protein may function as an NIMA-related kinase,” it adds.

The patent application states that the invention covers a polynucleotide, such as an siRNA, capable of inhibiting human NRHK1 gene expression by RNA interference, as well as a method of introducing the polynucleotide in order to induce RNA interference.


Title: Compositions, Organisms, and Methodologies Employing a Novel Human Kinase. Number: 20040096889. Filed: Oct. 10, 2003. Lead Inventor: Wei Liu, Wyeth.

The patent application, its abstract states, covers “compositions, organisms, and methodologies employing a novel human protein kinase, HPK3P23.”

The abstract notes that “the novel protein kinase has sequence homology to the catalytic domains of several protein kinases. The gene encoding this novel protein kinase is localized in or near the 3p23 locus of human chromosome 3.”

It adds that the “sequence similarity between the novel human protein and the catalytic domain of protein kinases indicates that the novel human protein may function as a protein kinase.”

The application specifically claims a polynucleotide, including an siRNA, capable of inhibiting human HPK3P23 gene expression by RNA interference, as well as a method of introducing the polynucleotide in order to induce RNA interference.


Title: RNAi Probes Targeting Cancer-Related Proteins. Number: 20040096882. Filed: Aug. 21, 2003. Lead Inventor: Martin Gleave, OncoGeneX Technologies.

The patent application’s abstract notes that “RNAi sequences that are useful as therapeutics in the treatment of cancers of various types, including prostate cancer; sarcomas such as osteosarcoma; renal cell carcinoma; breast cancer; bladder cancer; lung cancer; colon cancer; ovarian cancer; anaplastic large cell lymphoma and melanoma; and Alzheimer’s disease … target clusterin; IGFBP-5; IGFBP-2; both IGFBP-2 and -5 simultaneously; Mitf; and B-raf.”

The invention, according to the abstract, “provides for the use of these RNAi sequences in the treatment of cancers of various types … and Alzheimer’s disease, and a method of treating such conditions through the administration of the RNA molecules with RNAi activity to an individual, including a human individual in need of such a treatment.”


Title: Methods of Producing Interfering RNA Molecules in Mammalian Cells and Therapeutic Uses for Such Molecules. Number: 20040096843. Filed: Feb. 13, 2003. Lead Inventor: John Rossi, Beckman Research Institute.

The patent application, states its abstract, covers “methods for producing interfering RNA molecules in mammalian cells. Therapeutic uses for the expressed molecules, including inhibiting expression of HIV, are also provided,” it adds.

The application specifically claims a method for producing double-stranded RNA molecules in mammalian cells (including human cells) by “inserting DNA sequences encoding a sense strand and an antisense strand of [an] RNA molecule,” including an siRNA, “into a vector comprising an RNA pol III promoter … and … introducing the vector into a mammalian cell so that the RNA molecule can be expressed ... and initiate RNA interference of expression of a target gene.” One of the targets covered by the application is an HIV target gene.

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