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Eleven RNAi-Related Patent Applications Published by the USPTO

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Title: RIP140 Regulation of Glucose Transport

Number: 20050261223

Filed: March 7, 2005

Lead Inventor: Michael Czech, University of Massachusetts

"Inhibition of RIP140 increases glucose transport," the patent application's abstract states. "Compounds that inhibit RIP140 expression or activity are useful for treating disorders associated with aberrant glucose transport (e.g., diabetes), treating obesity, increasing metabolism (e.g., fatty acid metabolism), and increasing brown fat."


Title: Oligoribonucleotides for the Treatment of Irritative or Inflammatory Skin Symptoms Through RNA Interference

Number: 20050261222

Filed: March 3, 2005

Lead Inventor: Rainer Wolber, Beiersdorf

"The invention is a double-stranded oligoribonucleotide or a physiologically compatible salt thereof, which is capable of inducing the degradation of mRNA of one of more structures involved in inflammation or irritation of the skin," the patent application's abstract states. "The invention is also cosmetic or therapeutic compositions comprising one or more such double-stranded oligoribonucleotide and methods of treatment by use thereof."


Title: RNA Interference-Mediated Inhibition of Interleukin and Interleukin Receptor Gene Expression Using Short Interfering Nucleic Acid

Number: 20050261219

Filed: Dec. 1, 2004

Lead Inventor: Ivan Richards, Sirna Therapeutics

"This invention relates to compounds, compositions, and methods useful for modulating interleukin and/or interleukin receptor gene expression using short interfering nucleic acid molecules," the patent application's abstract states. "This invention also relates to compounds, compositions, and methods useful for modulating the expression and activity of other genes involved in pathways of interleukin and/or interleukin receptor gene expression and/or activity by RNA interference using small nucleic acid molecules. In particular, the instant invention features small nucleic acid molecules, such as short interfering nucleic acid, short interfering RNA, double-stranded RNA, microRNA, and short hairpin RNA molecules and methods used to modulate the expression of interleukin and/or interleukin receptor genes. … Such small nucleic acid molecules are useful, for example, for treating, preventing, inhibiting, or reducing cancer, inflammatory, respiratory, autoimmune, cardiovascular, neurological, and/or proliferative diseases, disorders, or conditions in a subject or organism, and for any other disease, trait, or condition that is related to or will respond to the levels of interleukin and/or interleukin receptor in a cell or tissue, alone or in combination with other treatments or therapies," the abstract adds.


Title: Oligomeric Compounds and Compositions for Use in Modulation of Small Non-Coding RNAs

Number: 20050261218

Filed: July 30, 2004

Lead Inventor: Christine Esau, Isis Pharmaceuticals

According to the patent application's abstract, "compounds, compositions, and methods are provided for modulating the expression and function of small non-coding RNAs. The compositions comprise oligomeric compounds, targeted to small non-coding RNAs. Methods of using these compounds for modulation of small non-coding RNAs as well as downstream targets of these RNAs and for diagnosis and treatment of disease associated with small non-coding RNAs are also provided," the abstract states.


Title: RNA Interference-Mediated Inhibition of NOGO and NOGO Receptor Gene Expression Using Short Interfering RNA

Number: 20050261212

Filed: July 26, 2002

Inventor: James McSwiggen, Sirna Therapeutics

The invention "concerns methods and reagents useful in modulating gene expression in a variety of applications, including use in therapeutic, diagnostic, target validation, and genomic discovery applications associated with Alzheimer's disease," the patent application's abstract states. "Specifically, the invention relates to small interfering RNA molecules capable of mediating RNA interference against NOGO and NOGO receptor polypeptide and polynucleotide targets."


Title: Complex for Facilitating Delivery of dsRNA into a Cell and Uses Thereof

Number: 20050260756

Filed: Feb. 25, 2005

Lead Inventor: Carol Troy, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons

According to the patent application's abstract, the invention "provides a membrane-permeable complex for facilitating the delivery of a double-stranded ribonucleic acid molecule into a cell. Specifically, the invention provides a membrane-permeable complex that comprises a double-stranded ribonucleic acid molecule, such as a small interfering RNA, a cell-penetrating peptide, and a covalent bond linking the double-stranded ribonucleic acid to the cell-penetrating peptide. Also provided are methods of using the membrane-permeable complex of the present invention to deliver the double-stranded ribonucleic acid molecule to a cell or to inhibit expression of a gene product by a cell," the abstract states.


Title: Compositions and Methods that Modulate RNA Interference

Number: 20050260652

Filed: April 14, 2005

Lead Inventor: Gary Ruvkun, Harvard University

"The invention features compositions useful in modulating RNA interference in a wide variety of cell types for the treatment of virtually any disease or disorder related to the over-expression of a gene or genes, as well as methods of identifying and using such compositions," the patent application's abstract states.


Title: RNA Interference-Mediated Inhibition of Retinoblastoma Gene Expression Using Short Interfering Nucleic Acid

Number: 20050260620

Filed: Feb. 15, 2005

Lead Inventor: Angela Christiano, Columbia University (Sirna Therapeutics)

The invention "relates to compounds, compositions, and methods useful for modulating retinoblastoma (RB1) gene expression using short interfering nucleic acid molecules," the patent application's abstract states. "This invention also relates to compounds, compositions, and methods useful for modulating the expression and activity of other genes involved in pathways of retinoblastoma gene expression and/or activity by RNA interference using small nucleic acid molecules. In particular, the … invention features small nucleic acid molecules … and methods used to modulate the expression of retinoblastoma genes. Such small nucleic acid molecules are useful, for example, for treating, preventing, inhibiting, or reducing hearing loss, deafness, tinnitus, motion and balance disorders, cancer and proliferative diseases and any other disease, condition, trait or indication that can respond to the level of retinoblastoma in a cell or tissue, alone or in combination with other treatments or therapies," the abstract states.


Title: Oligo- or Polynucleotides

Number: 20050260617

Filed: Jan. 28, 2005

Lead Inventor: Kaoru Saigo, University of Tokyo

The patent application, its abstract states, covers "an oligo- or polynucleotide for an RNA interference comprising a sense sequence, a trimming sequence, and an antisense sequence in this order. In an example, the sense sequence is homologous to a part of a sequence of a target gene wherein a base in the nucleotide of 5' end is guanine, and a base in the nucleotide of 3' end is adenine, thymine, or uracil, the antisense sequence is complementary to the sense sequence and in the 7-bp-long region of the 5' terminal at least one base selected from the group consisting of adenine, thymine, and uracil is rich, and the trimming sequence comprises 5 to 52 nucleotides and is represented by the formula: (G or C)--X--Y-Z-(C or G) wherein the sense sequence, the trimming sequence, and the antisense sequence are consecutive, and this consecutive sequence does not comprise four or more consecutive nucleotides of which bases are thymine and/or uracil."


Title: Inhibition of Gene Expression by Delivery of Small Interfering RNA to Post-Embryonic Animal Cells In Vivo

Number: 20050260270

Filed: April 25, 2005

Lead Inventor: David Lewis, Mirus

The patent application, its abstract states, covers "a process … to deliver small interfering RNA to cells in vivo for the purpose of inhibiting gene expression in that cell. The small interfering RNA is less than 50 base-pairs in length. This process is practiced on post-embryonic animals," the abstract adds. "Inhibition is sequence-specific and relies on sequence identity of the small interfering RNA and the target nucleic acid molecule."


Title: Composition and Method for Introduction of RNA Interference Sequences into Targeted Cells and Tissues

Number: 20050260214

Filed: May 11, 2005

Lead Inventor: Michael Simon, Henry Ford Health System

According to the patent application's abstract, "a composition and method are provided by which double-stranded RNA containing small interfering RNA nucleotide sequences is introduced into specific cells and tissues for the purpose of inhibiting gene expression and protein production in those cells and tissues. Intracellular introduction of the small interfering RNA nucleotide sequences is accomplished by the internalization of a target cell specific ligand to which the double-stranded RNA containing a small interfering RNA nucleotide sequence is conjugated. The ligand is specific to a unique target cell surface antigen," the abstract states. "The ligand is either spontaneously internalized after binding to the cell surface antigen. Internalization is also facilitated by the binding of an RNA binding protein to the double-stranded RNA. If the unique cell surface antigen is not naturally internalized after binding to its ligand, internalization is promoted by the incorporation of an arginine-rich peptide, or other membrane permeable peptide, into the structure of the ligand or attachment of such a peptide to the ligand. The composition and method are practiced in whole living mammals, as well as cells living in tissue culture. The dsRNA is then hydrolyzed by Dicer, an RNAse III-like ribonuclease, thereby releasing siRNA which silences the target gene. Inhibition is nucleotide sequence specific and depends upon sequence identity of small interfering RNA with the target nucleic acid," it adds.

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