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Eight RNAi-Related Patent Applications Published by the USPTO

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Title: Intravascular Delivery of Nucleic Acid

Number: 20050182013

Filed: Dec. 10, 2004

Lead Inventor: Jon Wolff, Mirus Bio

According to the patent application's abstract, the invention comprises "a process for providing for expression of an exogenous nucleic acid in an extravascular parenchymal cell of a mammal. The nucleic acid is inserted into a vessel of a mammal and the permeability of the vessel is increased. Increasing permeability of the vessel allows delivery of the nucleic acid to an extravascular parenchymal cell," the abstract notes.


Title: Antiviral Therapy on the Basis of RNA Interference

Number: 20050182010

Filed: Oct. 12, 2004

Inventor: Petrus Theodorus de Haan

"The invention concerns a gene therapy for treatment of animals and humans which suffer from an infection with a chronic virus such as HIV or HCV," the patent application's abstract states. "It can also be used prophylactically to prevent chronic infection. The therapy makes use of a nucleotide construct stably integrated in the genome of the target cells of the virus, which is able to produce a single transcript or multiple transcripts capable of forming a double-stranded RNA which inhibits replication of the virus in situ," the abstract adds.


Title: RNA Interference-Mediated Inhibition of NF-Kappa B/REL-A Gene Expression Using Short Interfering Nucleic Acid

Number: 20050182009

Filed: Aug. 20, 2004

Lead Inventor: James McSwiggen, Sirna Therapeutics

"This invention relates to compounds, compositions, and methods useful for modulating NF-kappa B, REL-A, REL-B, REL, NK-kappa B1, or NF-kappa B2 gene expression using short interfering nucleic acid molecules," the patent application's abstract states. "This invention also relates to compounds, compositions, and methods useful for modulating the expression and activity of other genes involved in pathways of NF-kappa B, REL-A, REL-B, REL, NF-kappa B1, or NF-kappa B2 gene expression and/or activity by RNA interference using small nucleic acid molecules. In particular, the instant invention features small nucleic acid molecules, such as short interfering nucleic acid, short interfering RNA, double-stranded RNA, microRNA, and short hairpin RNA molecules and methods used to modulate the expression of NF-kappa B, REL-A, REL-B, REL, NF-kappa B1, or NF-kappa B2 genes, such as NF-kappa B and/or REL-A."


Title: RNA Interference-Mediated Inhibition of NOGO and NOGO Receptor Gene Expression Using Short Interfering Nucleic Acid

Number: 20050182008

Filed: Aug. 20, 2004

Lead Inventor: James McSwiggen, Sirna Therapeutics

"This invention relates to compounds, compositions, and methods useful for modulating NOGO and/or NOGO receptor gene expression using short interfering nucleic acid molecules," the patent application's abstract states. "This invention also relates to compounds, compositions, and methods useful for modulating the expression and activity of other genes involved in pathways of NOGO and/or NOGO receptor gene expression and/or activity by RNA interference using small nucleic acid molecules. In particular, the instant invention features small nucleic acid molecules, such as short interfering nucleic acid, short interfering RNA, double-stranded RNA, microRNA, and short hairpin RNA molecules and methods used to modulate the expression of NOGO and/or NOGO receptor genes, such as NOGO-A, NOGO-B, NOGO-C, NOGO-66 receptor, NI-35, NI-220, NI-250, myelin-associated glycoprotein, tenascin-R, and NG-2."


Title: RNA Interference-Mediated Inhibition of Interleukin and Interleukin Receptor Gene Expression Using Short Interfering Nucleic Acid

Number: 20050182007

Filed: Aug. 20, 2004

Lead Inventor: James McSwiggen, Sirna Therapeutics

"This invention relates to compounds, compositions, and methods useful for modulating interleukin and/or interleukin receptor gene expression using short interfering nucleic acid molecules," the patent application's abstract states. "This invention also relates to compounds, compositions, and methods useful for modulating the expression and activity of other genes involved in pathways of interleukin and/or interleukin receptor gene expression and/or activity by RNA interference using small nucleic acid molecules. In particular, the instant invention features small nucleic acid molecules, such as short interfering nucleic acid, short interfering RNA, double-stranded RNA, microRNA, and short hairpin RNA molecules and methods used to modulate the expression of interleukin and/or interleukin receptor genes, IL-1, IL-2, IL-3, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-7, IL-8, IL-9, IL-10, IL-11, IL-12, IL-13, IL-14, IL-15, IL-16, IL-17, IL-18, IL-19, IL-20, IL-21, IL-22, IL-23, IL-24, IL-25, IL-26, and IL-27 genes and IL-1R, IL-2R, IL-3R, IL-4R, IL-5R, IL-6R, IL-7R, IL-8R, IL-9R, IL-10R, IL-11R, 1L-12R, IL-13R, IL-14R, IL-15R, IL-16R, IL-17R, IL-18R, IL-19R, IL-20R, IL-21R, IL-22R, IL-23R, IL-24R, IL-25R, IL-26R, and IL-27R."


Title: RNA Interference-Mediated Inhibition of Protein Kinase C Alpha (PKC-Alpha) Gene Expression Using Short Interfering Nucleic Acid

Number: 20050182006

Filed: July 30, 2004

Lead Inventor: James McSwiggen, Sirna Therapeutics

"This invention relates to compounds, compositions, and methods useful for modulating PKC alpha gene expression using short interfering nucleic acid molecules," the patent application's abstract states. "This invention also relates to compounds, compositions, and methods useful for modulating the expression and activity of other genes involved in pathways of PKC alpha gene expression and/or activity by RNA interference using small nucleic acid molecules. In particular, the instant invention features small nucleic acid molecules, such as short interfering nucleic acid, short interfering RNA, double-stranded RNA, microRNA, and short hairpin RNA molecules and methods used to modulate the expression of PKC alpha genes. The small nucleic acid molecules are useful in the treatment of cancer and proliferative diseases and conditions."


Title: Synthetic Lethal Screen Using RNA Interference

Number: 20050181385

Filed: Sept. 22, 2004

Lead Inventor: Peter Linsley, Rosetta Inpharmatics (Merck)

According to the patent application's abstract, the invention "provides a method for identifying one or more genes in a cell of a cell type which interact with, e.g., modulate the effect of, an agent, e.g., a drug. For example, an identified gene may confer resistance or sensitivity to a drug, i.e., reduces or enhances the effect of the drug. The invention also provides STK6 and TPX2 as a gene that exhibits synthetic lethal interactions with KSP encoding a kinesin-like motor protein, and methods and compositions for treatment of diseases, e.g., cancers, by modulating the expression of STK6 or TPX2 gene and/or the activity of STK6 or TPX2 gene product," the abstract states. "The invention also provides genes involved in cellular response to DNA damage, and their therapeutic uses."


Title: Methods and Compositions for Enhancing the Efficacy and Specificity of RNAi

Number: 20050181382

Filed: June 2, 2004

Lead Inventor: Phillip Zamore, University of Massachusetts

"The … invention provides methods of enhancing the efficacy and specificity of RNAi," the patent application's abstract states. "The invention also provides compositions for mediating RNAi. In particular, the invention provides siRNAs, shRNAs, vectors, and transgenes having improved specificity and efficacy in mediating silencing of a target gene. Therapeutic methods are also featured."

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