Using morpholinos to induce exon skipping, researchers rescued some dystrophin function in dogs with the canine form of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Scientists from Children's National Medical Center in Washington, DC, and the National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry in Tokyo restored dystrophin function to about 20 percent of normal levels. "[The] treatment has clearly shown efficacy in a large animal," says lead author Eric Hoffman from Children's, though he adds that the team's Annals of Neurology study was not blinded.

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The New York Times reports that as China invests in science, it also is dealing with research fraud.

In PLOS this week: transcriptome study of a cold-tolerant plant, deep sequencing of clinical influenza A samples, and more.

The Atlantic writes that retrotransposons like BovB have proliferated in a number of genomes.

Researchers have sequenced the genome of a man who lived in China some 40,000 years ago, according to UPI.