By Doug Macron

With its ability to down-regulate almost any gene of interest, RNAi has been touted as a technology with almost limitless therapeutic potential, capable of hitting targets that have eluded traditional modalities such as small molecules.

Despite this promise, companies working in the space have taken a decidedly measured approach in building their internal pipelines, focusing on a relatively small number of drug-development programs.

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Dog DNA testing finds that some purebreds might not truly be purebreds, Inside Edition reports.

Mary Beckerle has returned as director of the Huntsman Cancer Institute, according to ScienceInsider.

Smithsonian Magazine reports that environmental DNA sampling can be used to track elusive organisms.

In Genome Research this week: repetitive satellite DNA in the fruit fly, transcriptome map assembly pipeline, and more.