Although RNA interference has revolutionized the lifesciences, the technology is still relatively unknown to the general population. All that may change, at least for the average pet lover, if Los Angeles-based Allerca achieves its goal of using the gene-silencing technology to develop a hypoallergenic cat.

According to Simon Brodie, the president of the six-person company, the idea to develop the genetically-modified cat has been around for years.

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Sometimes genetic tests give inconclusive results and provide little reassurance to patients, the Associated Press reports.

Vox wonders whether gene-editing crops will be viewed similarly as genetically modified organisms of if people will give them a try.

In Science this week: research regulation and reporting requirement reform, and more.

NPR reports that government and private insurers are being slow to cover recently approved CAR-T cell therapies.

Aug
07
Sponsored by
Qiagen

This webinar will present the results of an evaluation of a web-based variant interpretation software system for clinical next-generation sequencing.