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GenomeWebinars

Thu
Sep
16
2:00 PM
US Eastern

Sponsored by BD

Dynamic and Functional Multiomic Profiling for Immunotherapy and Vaccines

Activating the immune system with vaccines or immunotherapy has had a major impact on the prevention and treatment of human diseases. Engineering effective vaccines for respiratory diseases or genetically modified immune cells for cancer treatment has created new challenges in quantifying a functional immune response.

In this webinar, Navin Varadarajan, professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering at the University of Houston, will describe single-cell technology platforms and molecular engineering approaches that his lab has developed to address these problems and how these approaches are being implemented to improve the efficacy of cancer immunotherapy and engineer next-generation mucosal vaccines.

Key takeaways:

  1. The use of integrated dynamic and transcriptional single-cell profiling to engineer more potent serial killer chimeric antigen receptor T cells for solid tumors
  2. The use of single-cell RNA sequencing to demonstrate that the nasal-associated lymphoid tissue (NALT) is an immune inductive site upon immunization with intranasal SARS-CoV-2 subunit vaccines

Sponsored by

Fri
Sep
17
10:00 AM
US Eastern

Sponsored by 10x Genomics

Emerging Methods to Minimize Off-Target Effects of Genome Editing: A Stakeholder Panel Discussion

The use of CRISPR-based genome editing has increased significantly since its discovery in bacteria. And the number of applications for the technology — from research to drug development and therapies, plant breeding, diagnostics, and more — seem endless, especially given the development of more versatile and flexible nucleases, or more precise methods such as base editing and prime editing. 

But off-target effects continue to be a challenge to overcome, as has capturing the full scope of those effects, from their impact on DNA to how they affect the transcriptome and beyond. In this roundtable discussion, a panel of gene-editing experts will discuss the methods that are being developed to find, assess, and minimize the effects of off-target edits that result from CRISPR-based genome editing and base editing. Our panel will cover a range of topics, including reliable methods for quality control of those effects, what these off-target detection methods have revealed about genome editing, and how they could help CRISPR researchers perfect the technology and broaden its applicability.  

Our expert panel on this session will be Dr. Neville Sanjana, Core Faculty Member, New York Genome Center and Assistant Professor in the Departments of Biology and of Neuroscience and Physiology at New York University, John G. Doench, Institute Scientist at Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard and Dr. Kiana Aran, Co-Founder & Chief Scientific Officer at Cardea Bio and Associate Professor, Medical Diagnostics & Therapeutics at Keck Graduate Institute.

Sponsored by

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Mon
Sep
20
11:00 AM
US Eastern

Sponsored by PerkinElmer

Applications and Protocols for High-Throughput, Automated Single-Cell RNA Sequencing

The development of robust protocols sensitive enough to measure nucleic acids from single cells is revolutionizing biology, enabling the interrogation of molecular mechanisms that are not evident from measurements representing the average of thousands of cells. Established plate-based protocols provide scalable and robust measurements of mRNA, producing libraries of high complexity — thousands of distinct genes — with outstanding sensitivity and specificity of transcript quantification. However, technologies in this field are rapidly evolving and have recently enabled RNA-seq to be conducted on thousands of single cells in parallel. 

In this webinar, Dr. Lira Mamanova, Staff Scientist at the Wellcome Sanger Institute, will share her experience in the evaluation and implementation of novel applications and protocols for single-cell transcriptomics, including the development of high-throughput, automated single-cell RNA-seq pipelines. Ease of use, equipment requirements, running time, cost per sample, and sequencing quality will be discussed. 

Sponsored by

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Tue
Sep
21
1:00 PM
US Eastern

Sponsored by DNAnexus

Whole Genome Sequencing for Healthy Individuals: Providing Genomics-Based Guidelines for the Optimization of Care and Lifestyle

It has been more than 20 years since the completion of the first draft of the human genome, yet the promise of utilizing genomics in daily clinical care has not come to fruition. This is largely due to prohibitive costs, but also to a diagnostic-centric approach to genomics testing.

The genomic testing industry is at a turning point driven by the commoditization and cost reduction of next-generation sequencing, and by analysis platforms that enable a data-driven economy. To this end, the precision health assessment practiced in Human Longevity’s Health Nucleus Clinic aggregates more than 150 gigabytes of data from whole-genome sequencing, whole-body magnetic resonance imaging, metabolomics, comprehensive blood biomarkers, and other modalities to deliver a complete, personalized picture of health.

In this webinar, Wayne Delport will discuss the development of a whole-genome sequencing product used by Health Nucleus physicians to provide personalized care based on assessment of risk. Delport will cover the technical and regulatory challenges posed by delivery of this product and how HLI used the DNAnexus Titan Platform on Amazon Web Services to streamline their genomics infrastructure. This enables the company to focus on product improvements over maintenance of infrastructure.

You will learn:

  • How Human Longevity Inc. (HLI) developed the content for their whole-genome sequencing report – including monogenic, polygenic, pharmacogenomics, and nutrition and wellness findings
  • How HLI transitioned to outsource whole-genome sequencing and focus entirely on running a dry lab
  • How HLI has operationalized its CAP/CLIA whole-genome product, and what insights it has already gained from the ~5,000 healthy clients
  • How HLI develops content and apps on the DNAnexus Platform
  • How the DNAnexus Platform handles everything from data ingestion, data analysis, and data delivery for HLI

Sponsored by

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Wed
Sep
22
9:00 AM
US Eastern

Sponsored by Sciex

Biomarkers of Human Physical Fitness Discovered by Targeted Metabolomics

Human metabolism reflects both intrinsic and environmental challenges. In search of biomarkers quantifying human physical fitness, Jerzy Adamski and colleagues compared metabolomic signatures of marathon runners, sprinters, endurance athletes, and natural bodybuilders to those of untrained healthy controls. They identified signatures associated with top performers and further provided insights into the pathways affected. Data analyses, including those of biomarkers and pathways, profited from the absolute quantification of metabolites by targeted metabolomics.

Fitness, aging, ethnicity, nutrition, and microbiome analyses would benefit from upscaling the number of individuals involved. This could be achieved by meta-studies based on multicenter standardized targeted metabolomics assays. To facilitate this approach, Adamski and colleagues recently launched an international ring trial of the biocrates MxP Quant 500 assay to empower standardization, quality assurance, reproducibility, and data interpretation.

RUO-MKT-01-13510-A

Sponsored by

Thu
Sep
23
2:00 PM
US Eastern

Sponsored by Ionpath

Next-Gen Multimodal Spatial Analytical Methods for Understanding Tissue Responses to Infection and Cancer

A thorough understanding of complex spatial host-disease interactions in situ is necessary to develop effective preventative measures and therapeutic strategies. Techniques that can take advantage of the high-resolution spatial tissue phenotyping capabilities of Multiplexed Ion Beam Imaging while providing a multiomic readout with robust data analysis tools are critical to this effort.

In this webinar, Sizun Jiang, Principal Investigator at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, will discuss recent work on spatial methodologies and frameworks broadly applicable to deciphering tissue responses to various malignancies, including infectious diseases and tumor biology. These methodologies include:

  • Simultaneous measurements of protein and nucleic acids in tissues with Protein And Nucleic acid IN situ Imaging (PANINI)
  • Robust correction for lateral spillage of cell surface markers between adjacent cells using REinforcement Dynamic Spillover EliminAtion (REDSEA)
  • Spatial lineage tracking using epitope combinatorial tags (Epic)

Sponsored by

Tue
Sep
28
10:00 AM
US Eastern

Sponsored by BD

Single-Cell Proteogenomic Reference Maps of the Hematopoietic System Enable Massive Profiling of Precisely Defined Cell States

Single-cell genomics has transformed our understanding of complex cellular systems. However, excessive costs and a lack of strategies for the purification of newly identified cell types have impeded functional characterization and large-scale profiling.

In this webinar, Sergio Triana of the European Molecular Biology Laboratory and Dominik Vonficht of the German Cancer Research Center will describe their latest work, where they generated high-content single-cell proteogenomic reference maps of human blood and bone marrow that quantitatively link the expression of up to 197 surface markers to cellular identities and biological processes across all major hematopoietic cell types in healthy aging and leukemia.

These reference maps enable cost-effective high-throughput cytometry schemes that outperform state-of-the-art approaches, accurately reflect complex topologies of cellular systems, and permit the purification of precisely defined cell states.

Triana and Vonficht will discuss how the systematic integration of cytometry and proteogenomic data enabled them to measure the functional capacities of precisely mapped cell states at the single-cell level.

Learning objectives:

  • Understand the experimental design needed to apply single-cell multiomics to healthy and diseased bone marrow
  • Learn how to use surface marker profiling to generate gating schemes to purify molecularly defined populations
  • Review different approaches to apply and validate new gating schemes on rare populations in the bone marrow

Sponsored by

Wed
Sep
29
1:00 PM
US Eastern

Sponsored by Millipore Sigma

Development of New Metabolism-Based Multi-Cancer Biomarkers to Detect the Earliest Stages of Cancer

This webinar will address the need for innovation in the early detection of cancer and the approach taken by Elypta, a Swedish cancer detection firm, to develop new metabolism-based biomarkers.

Elypta was funded by the EU Horizon 2020 program to bring the first kidney cancer recurrence test to market. Elypta’s approach is based on profiling glycosaminoglycans — or the GAGome — and developing scores indicative of cancer. At the 2021 American Society of Clinical Oncology conference, a proof-of-concept study across 14 cancer types revealed the broader potential for early detection using the technology, highlighting the sensitivity to stage I disease.

Karl Bergman, CEO of Elypta, will discuss the need for new cancer biomarkers and Elypta’s results highlighting the potential of glycosaminoglycans as a tool in early detection. He will also outline the path Elypta took to develop their research-use-only (RUO) kits, partnering with MilliporeSigma at an early stage to ensure a clear path to large-scale in vitro diagnostic (IVD) manufacturing and enabling the Elypta team to focus their efforts on research and development.

Michael Mitchell, commercial project manager at MilliporeSigma, will discuss the milestones and challenges of MilliporeSigma’s work with Elypta. Mitchell will cover highlights from the set-up, pilot, and engineering phases of Elypta’s RUO cancer detection kit, as well as the preparative work for their IVD offering.

Attendees will learn:

  • Why more biomarkers are needed for the earliest stages of cancer
  • Key aspects and results from the GAGome-based liquid biopsy platform developed by Elypta
  • How a partnership with MilliporeSigma helped Elypta in the development journey

Sponsored by

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Thu
Sep
30
11:00 AM
US Eastern

Sponsored by Agena Bioscience

The Promise of Liquid Biopsy for Individualizing Cancer Care

This webinar will provide an overview of how liquid biopsies – the molecular analysis of circulating cell-free tumor DNA (ctDNA) released into the blood - can provide new insights into tumor biology and help personalize patient care.

Klaus Pantel, Chairman of the Institute of Tumor Biology at University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, will discuss how liquid biopsy analyses can provide information for the early detection of cancer and identify cancer patients at risk of relapse. The approach may also serve to monitor tumor evolution, therapeutic targets, or mechanisms of resistance on metastatic cells.

Liquid biopsies show particular promise for metastatic cancers. Repeated needle biopsies of metastatic lesions are invasive and some locations are difficult to access. In contrast, monitoring of blood samples is only minimally invasive and can identify tumor evolution and tumor subtype switches, which may then lead to the selection of appropriate therapies based on the molecular composition of recurrent metastases.

Prof. Pantel will also discuss the importance of technical standardization and clinical validation of liquid biopsy assays.

Dr. Alexander Sartori from Agena Bioscience will follow with an overview of Agena’s MassArray System and available variant panels for circulating cell-free DNA in various cancers.

Sponsored by

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Tue
Oct
05
10:00 AM
US Eastern

Sponsored by Natera

Advances in ctDNA-Guided Treatment Decisions in Urothelial Carcinoma

The recent publication of IMvigor010 trial data demonstrates the strength of circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) testing post-cystectomy in muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) to help identify patients likely to benefit from immunotherapy. The data analysis demonstrated both the prognostic and the predictive value of molecular residual disease (MRD) testing in this patient population. In this webinar, Thomas Powles, professor of genitourinary oncology and director of the Barts Cancer Centre, will share the findings of the IMvigor010 data analysis, present relevant MIBC publications, and discuss the IMvigor011 Phase III trial.

Join the discussion of this and other potential applications of ctDNA in urothelial carcinoma:

  • Surveillance monitoring with ctDNA could allow for earlier detection of relapse on a molecular level and potentially allow clinicians to treat patients at low levels of disease burden.
  • Treatment response monitoring of MRD could predict outcomes as early as week six into adjuvant therapy.
  • Post-TURBT treatment decisions for Stage I or lower patients could be enhanced by assessing MRD.
  • Further research of ctDNA testing in the neoadjuvant setting in bladder cancer could potentially create a pathway for Stage II and Stage III patients to avoid cystectomy.

Sponsored by

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Wed
Oct
06
1:00 PM
US Eastern

Sponsored by Akoya Biosciences

I-SPY 2 Trial Innovations: Clinical Trial Design and the Use of Spatial Biomarkers

The I-SPY 2 (investigation of serial studies to predict your therapeutic response with imaging and molecular analysis) is an adaptive clinical trial platform that supports the rapid, focused clinical development of paired oncologic therapies and biomarkers. The goal is to identify improved treatment regimens based on the molecular characteristics of individual patients’ disease.

In this webinar, Drs. Laura Esserman and Michael Campbell will discuss the I-SPY 2 trial of neoadjuvant treatment for locally advanced breast cancer. The trial involved the use of Multiplex Immunofluorescence (mIF) based biomarker panels, developed with the Akoya Phenoptics platform, to map the heterogeneity of the tumor microenvironment.

Drs. Esserman and Campbell have standardized biomarker discovery and development efforts on the Phenoptics platform to measure as many as six markers at a time on a single pathology slide using multiplex immunofluorescence.  They will discuss how I-SPY 2 has the potential to significantly accelerate the time to get effective treatments to the patients who will benefit, while also reducing the cost of drug development.

In this talk, attendees will:

  • Learn how the I-SPY 2 trial’s innovative adaptive trial design has accelerated the pace of new drug development in oncology through improved clinical trials and biomarker use for breast cancer.
  • Understand the value of spatial biomarkers and their use in the I-SPY trials to serve as predictors of response to immuno-oncology drug combinations.
  • Learn how fundamental innovations deriving from the I-SPY 2 trial are improving clinical trials and patient care on many levels and how a number of these advances have become best practices.

Sponsored by

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Tue
Oct
12
11:30 AM
US Eastern

Sponsored by DNA Script

Custom Library Adaptors Via Enzymatic DNA Synthesis Improve Precision of Real-Time Nanopore Sequencing

This webinar will discuss how benchtop enzymatic DNA synthesis enables the rapid creation of oligonucleotides that can be combined with real-time nanopore DNA sequencing to accelerate iterative design and testing cycles in synthetic biology.

Tim Mercer of the Australian Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnology will share how his team uses enzymatic DNA synthesis to build novel, custom library adaptors, termed CAPTORS, that contain functional sequence elements that can measure the qualitative and quantitative accuracy of a DNA sequencing library. Dr. Mercer will demonstrate how CAPTORS are used to prepare libraries from patient samples, with the functional information retrieved during nanopore sequencing.

In one example of the applications for this work, Dr. Mercer will show how the analysis of CAPTORS using adaptive sequencing allows real-time evaluation of sequencing accuracy at per-read, per-pore, and time level during metagenome experiments in the Nevada Toluca volcano near Mexico City.

CAPTORS can also analyze quantitative accuracy, improving measurements of gene expression in mRNA samples, and enabling best-in-class normalization between samples across large patient cohorts, longitudinal patient timelines, and point-of-care testing. These benefits can also be employed to improve clinical diagnosis, with CAPTORS able to sufficiently mitigate nanopore sequencing errors to improve the diagnosis of pathogenic BRCA1/2 variants in breast cancer.

Together, this demonstrates how the enzymatic synthesis of CAPTORs can affix information within patient samples during library preparation that is later retrieved by sequencing. The information encoded within CAPTORS can act as internal ‘software’ that interfaces with external bioinformatic software for responsive analysis, and can integrate patient samples into a large decentralized global network or a clinical IT infrastructure.

Sponsored by

Tue
Oct
12
7:00 PM
US Eastern

Sponsored by 10x Genomics

Spatial Genomics in the Era of Immunotherapy … and COVID-19

This webinar will discuss the applications of spatial transcriptomics for elucidating the molecular mechanisms of immunotherapy response as well as the pathogenesis of SARS-CoV-2.

Arutha Kulasinghe, Spatial Biology Group Lead at the University of Queensland, will discuss recent advances in the use of spatial transcriptomics, which provides unprecedented insights into tissue architecture and cellular activation status.

Dr. Kulasinghe will provide an overview of spatial genomics and proteomics as well as an overview of current technologies and applications in basic and clinical research. He will also discuss two recent studies from his team: one that applied spatial transcriptomics to identify predictive biomarkers for immunotherapy and another that used spatial transcriptomics to identify host response signatures in patients infected with SARS-CoV-2. These studies highlight the use of spatial transcriptomics for biomarker discovery approaches.

Dr. Kulasinghe will also address future directions and applications for spatial biology in translational research and pathology.

Sponsored by

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Wed
Oct
13
11:00 AM
US Eastern

Sponsored by Akoya Biosciences

MITRE Study: Standardizing Spatial Phenotyping and Biomarker Analysis with Multiplexed Immunofluorescence in Immuno-Oncology

In this webinar, Dr. Bernard Fox and Elizabeth Engle will discuss the results of the Multi-Institutional TSA-amplified Multiplexed Immunofluorescence Reproducibility Evaluation (MITRE Study), published in the Journal for ImmunoTherapy of Cancer (JITC) in July 2021. The MITRE study is the first multi-institutional study involving multiplexed immunofluorescence (mIF) designed to develop and validate a spatial biology workflow that is transferable among sites and delivers site-independent and reliable quantitative data for immunotherapy research. The MITRE results are an important step toward standardizing an automated mIF-based spatial biology workflow that provides the level of performance needed to support clinical trials and that can be applied to clinical testing in the future.

In this talk, attendees will:

  • Review evidence that evaluating the immune landscape of cancer can inform a patient’s prognosis and provide predictive biomarkers for response to therapy. 
  • Learn about the MITRE study and the evidence it provides on the standardization of an automated spatial biology workflow for clinical and translational research.
  • Understand the value of spatial biomarkers and how they allow researchers to map the interactions of tumor and immune cells across an entire tumor tissue section without destroying the spatial context of the tissue, enabling a more accurate assessment of tumor-immune biology.
  • Learn how the Phenoptics mIF solution is being used by researchers to develop spatial biomarkers for trials and eventual clinical use.

Sponsored by

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Thu
Oct
14
4:00 PM
US Eastern

Sponsored by BD

Multiomic Analysis of Immune Regulation in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Points to New Therapeutic Strategies

Checkpoint inhibitors have revolutionized cancer treatment, but only a small proportion of breast cancer patients have shown benefit from immunotherapy. One of the factors limiting the effect of immunotherapies is the presence of tumor-educated immunosuppressive myeloid populations that inhibit anti-cancer T-cell cytotoxic killing activity.

Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are a heterogeneous and poorly defined group of tumor-infiltrating myeloid progenitors that contribute to cancer progression and metastasis. MDSCs are a compelling target for cancer therapy, but their high heterogeneity and poor definition hamper the development of anti-cancer MDSC-based therapy.

In this webinar, David Gallego Ortega of the University of Technology Sydney School of Biomedical Engineering will discuss a study that used single-cell RNA-seq in mouse models of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) to create a spatiotemporal atlas of inflammation associated with metastatic breast cancer cell dissemination. This high-resolution map of the cellular composition and functional diversity of inflammatory cells identified a subclass of granulocytic MDSCs involved in the formation of the pro-metastatic niche and progression to metastatic disease.

Dr. Ortega’s team further characterized this pro-metastatic MDSC subclass integrating a high-dimensional cell surface antibody panel (18 FACS antibodies + 91 AbSeq antibodies) to the single-cell whole-transcriptome profiling of MDSCs to uncover immunosuppressive pathways and molecular targets with potential therapeutic value.

This high-resolution multiomic definition of pro-metastatic MDSCs is a step forward for designing new strategies to efficiently reprogram immunosuppressive cell populations and stimulate antitumor immunity, ultimately paving the way for the development of the next generation of immunotherapy for aggressive breast cancer.

Learning objectives include:

  • Building a spatiotemporal atlas for deep characterisation of cell states during the pre-metastatic niche formation at the single-cell level
  • Integrating a high-dimensional cell surface antibody panel (18 FACS antibodies + 91 AbSeq antibodies) and single-cell whole-transcriptome profiles of protumorigenic MDSCs 
  • Designing new strategies to efficiently reprogram immunosuppressive cell populations and stimulate antitumor immunity

Sponsored by