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April 22, 2021
Sponsored by
10x Genomics

Single-Cell Genomics Decodes the Developing Human Immune System

GenomeWebinar

Wellcome Trust Senior Research Fellow, Lister Institute Research Fellow, and Consultant Dermatologist,
Newcastle University

The human immune system is extremely complex, comprised of multiple cell types and states interacting in myriad ways to produce diverse cellular ecosystems. The rise of single-cell genomics in recent years has contributed a great deal to understanding this complexity and the role of the immune system in infection, inflammation, and disease.

In this webinar, Muzlifah Haniffa of Newcastle University will demonstrate the application of single-cell genomics to decode the developing human immune system. In particular, she will discuss her work using single-cell RNA sequencing to study human fetal liver haematopoiesis and developing and adult skin.

Prof. Haniffa will discuss this work within her broader research goal of understanding how developmental immune programs may be co-opted in post-natal disease. A detailed understanding of the developing immune system is also relevant to improve stem cell therapy and regenerative medicine.

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