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July 09, 2019
Sponsored by
GenomeWeb/ABRF

Overview and Insights from the 2018/19 ABRF Multi-Laboratory DIA Study

GenomeWebinar

National Institute of Standards and Technology

Leibniz Institute on Aging – Fritz Lipmann Institute

This webinar outlines a project led by the Association for Biomolecular Resource Facilities to help academic and core facilities who are using Data-Independent Acquisition (DIA) technology for protein quantification.

Proteomics researchers are realizing the promise of DIA, but due to the variety of acquisition methods, there is a need to develop best practices and offer opportunity for adoption. The ABRF Proteomics Research Group (PRG) realized that there was a need for a go-to resource for new users interested in DIA studies. Such a resource would provide information about sample processing, data acquisition, and data analysis.

As part of this study, a prototype sample set was used that was comprised of a HeLa digest spiked with four non-human proteins at different concentrations. Upon request, this sample was provided to 64 participants from labs all across the world, along with recommended data-acquisition methods. Raw data was requested from participants for the PRG to analyze. The user profile of the 45 laboratories who submitted the data had a good representation of users who were new to DIA; as well as those who had prior DIA experience.

Results from this study and future plans will be presented in the webinar.

More information on other webinars in this series can be found here.

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