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May 08, 2019
Sponsored by
Sysmex Inostics

OncoBEAM ctDNA Testing for Early Response Prediction and Therapy Surveillance in Melanoma and Pancreatic Cancer

GenomeWebinar

Medical Oncologist, Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center

Director of the Institute of Laboratory Medicine, German Heart Center of the Technical University

This webinar presents recent evidence that demonstrates how incorporating circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) assessments into real-world patient management can influence patient care decisions, alter radiographic interpretations, and impact clinical outcomes.

In particular, this webinar discusses OncoBEAM a ctDNA testing method based on BEAMing (Beads, Emulsion, Amplification, Magnetics) technology developed at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. OncoBEAM provides highly sensitive mutation analysis for the accurate and reliable detection of rare tumor-derived DNA present in the blood of patients with cancer.

In this webinar, Dr. Evan Lipson of Johns Hopkins shares his experience on the clinical utility of ctDNA measurements as an adjunct to radiographic imaging for monitoring disease activity in advanced melanoma patients undergoing treatment with targeted therapy or immune checkpoint inhibitors. These results have important implications for the clinical management of patients receiving immunotherapy and demonstrate the value of performing ctDNA testing for better resolution of tumor activity when performed alongside routine imaging and clinical assessments.

Next, Dr. Stefan Holdenrieder of the Technical University of Munich examines the value of KRAS-mutant ctDNA as a highly specific marker for early response prediction and treatment monitoring of advanced pancreatic cancer patients receiving chemotherapy. The discussion focuses on the potential clinical benefit of monitoring changes in ctDNA levels in response to therapy, which appear more pronounced and rapid than changes in established protein biomarkers.

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