October 07, 2015
Sponsored by
Personal Genome Diagnostics

High-Sensitivity Plasma Testing for Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

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This webinar highlights the key considerations and applications of next-generation sequencing for managing non-small cell lung cancer patients using plasma-based approaches. 

NSCLC is the most common type of lung cancer, accounting for about 80 percent of all lung cancer cases. Approximately 35 percent of NSCLC patients do not have sufficient tissue biopsy material for informative NGS testing due to late-stage diagnosis and difficulties associated with repeat biopsy for real-time monitoring. 

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