November 01, 2016
Sponsored by
New England BioLabs

GenomeWeb/ABRF 2016 Webinar Series: Tools and Trends for CRISPR/Cas9 Editing in Mammalian Cells

GenomeWebinar

Director, Transgenic Core Facility, University of Nebraska Medical Center 

Director, Gene Editing Institute, Christiana Care Health System’s Helen F. Graham Cancer Institute & Research Center 

This webinar outlines new strategies for genome editing in mammalian cells using CRISPR/Cas9, with talks focused on point mutation repair in human cell lines and the design of knock-in animal models.

During this webcast,Dr. Eric Kmiec discusses a new approach to the correction of point mutations using single-stranded oligonucleotides and a partially synthetic form of CRISPR/ Cas9, a ribonucleotideprotein (RNP) complex. The experimental design, including the process of RNP assembly and the workflow, will be presented.

Dr. Kmiec shares details of a case study in which a point mutation in an integrated copy of the mutated eGFP gene in a human cell line is corrected using this approach, and a reaction pathway that is likely distinct from that of homology-directed repair. The use of short single-stranded oligonucleotides may be a strategy of choice when the desired endpoint is correction of point mutations in chromosomal genes.

Our second speaker, Dr. CB Gurumurthy, discusses the latest trends and CRISPR tools available for animal genome editing, with a particular emphasis on strategies for increasing the homology-directed repair mechanism to enable insertion of longer sequences at the Cas9 cut sites. A few examples of designing knock-in animal models and the workflow of generating the models will be presented. 

This webinar is the second on gene editing under the GenomeWeb/ABRF 2016 Webinar Series. The first webinar on gene editing is available on demand here

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