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May 05, 2021
Sponsored by
Illumina

Establishing a Pharmacogenomic Service for Routine Clinical Care

GenomeWebinar

Principal Research Fellow, Bioinformatics
Queensland University of Technology

Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are responsible for around 5 percent of hospital admissions and occur in 6 percent to 15 percent of hospital stays. Approximately 30 percent of ADRs are caused by drugs with a known major clinically significant pharmacogenomic variant, meaning that nearly one-third of adverse drug-related admissions may be predictable – and thus preventable - by pharmacogenomic (PGx) testing.

This webinar will review the introduction of pharmacogenomic testing into settings where it is likely to be particularly clinically relevant. Paul Leo of Queensland University of Technology will discuss a project that aimed to provide pre-emptive rather than reactive testing in the clinical setting by using rapid genomic technologies and information management integrated into the hospital electronic medical record. This vision required development of a PGx knowledge center and a clinical support database as well as the validation of new technologies to improve cost-effective PGx measurements.

The presentation will focus on the implementation of these goals as well as the challenges of introducing new genomic testing into routine clinical care.

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May
05
Sponsored by
Illumina

Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are responsible for around 5 percent of hospital admissions and occur in 6 percent to 15 percent of hospital stays.