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December 11, 2019
Sponsored by
Roche

Advances in Precision Oncology: Tertiary Analysis Software for Solid Tumor NGS

GenomeWebinar

Clinical Lab Support Coordinator, Molecular Diagnostics Laboratory,
Sentara Healthcare Laboratory Services

Associate Chief of Clinical Pathology and Medical Director Molecular and Microbiology Laboratories,
Baystate Health

This webinar addresses how two molecular laboratories are implementing tertiary analysis software to improve their precision oncology workflows.

Solid tumor biomarker analysis by next generation sequencing (NGS) allows for better tissue stewardship and more efficient delivery of actionable results than other methodologies like single gene sequencing, but data analysis and interpretation remains a significant barrier to NGS adoption in community settings. In particular, the final tertiary analysis of NGS data is complicated by several factors, including variant-to-variant interactions, variant curation, and time to report.

Our first speaker, Dr. David Seidman of Sentara Healthcare Laboratory Servicesdiscusses how automated interpretation of NGS variants with Navify Mutation Profiler reduces the need for time-consuming and error-prone manual analysis. Software capable of automatically identifying, interpreting, and visualizing clinically relevant variant combinations promises to further decrease the manual review time necessary to account for relevant variant combinations. In a diagnostic setting, addressing variant-variant interplay in an automated fashion may also help prevent inaccurate reporting that can adversely affect the test subject.         

Our second speaker, Dr. Franklin Moore of Baystate Healthdiscusses his experiences integrating Navify Mutation Profiler into his lab's workflow, both during the evaluation phase and the clinical validation. Dr. Moore will present data on variant detection, annotation, interpretation, and tier classification compared to a manual pipeline method. He will also address, issues, challenges, and future directions.

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