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GenomeWebinars

Director, Laboratory of Genetics and Genomics, Division of Human Genetics,
Associate Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

Bioinformatician,
Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center

Scientist,
Fabric Genomics

The growth of next-generation sequencing (NGS) testing presents both opportunities and challenges for clinical, informatics, and laboratory teams. This webinar discusses best practices and lessons learned for implementing and scaling whole-exome and virtual panel testing at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center. This includes both clinical considerations as well as end-to-end integration with the lab’s laboratory information management system (LIMS) as well as the hospital’s Epic Beaker laboratory information system (LIS) for seamless workflow and regulatory compliance.

In this webinar, you will learn:

  • Tips for integrating an artificial intelligence interpretation platform with a lab LIMS and hospital LIS
  • Best practices for optimizing diagnostic yield and turnaround time
  • First look at the benefits of Fabric AI
Sponsored by
Thu
Mar
11
1:00 pm2021
Sponsored by
Foundation Medicine

Virtual Molecular Tumor Board Series: Gene Fusions as Druggable Targets

GenomeWebinar

Medical Director, Precision Medicine
Geriatric Oncology Consortium

Chief, Precision Health and Genomics
Intermountain Healthcare

Research Scientist, Personalized Medicine Specialist,
DeBartolo Family Personalized Medicine Institute, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center

Co-Director, Oncology Precision Medicine Program,
Aurora Health Care

Lead Variant Scientist,
Intermountain Healthcare

In this session, the third in the Precision Oncology News Virtual Molecular Tumor Board Series, our expert panelists will review patient cases in which genomic profiling has identified gene fusions that may or may not serve as druggable targets.

Precision medicine has been focused on the presence of activating mutations or gene amplifications. However, recent data has shown that the presence of gene fusions also offer a unique treatment opportunity, with the potential for durable clinical responses.

Our panel will discuss several such clinical cases in detail and recommend a course of treatment based on the genomic profiles of the patients.

The session will wrap up with a live Q&A in which attendees can discuss the cases with the Virtual Molecular Tumor Board panelists.

About The Series

The Virtual Molecular Tumor Board Series is an interactive and educational online program intended to highlight the key role that molecular tumor boards play in implementing precision oncology.

The series will underscore the collaborative nature of genomic medicine by assembling a multidisciplinary panel of experts who will meet virtually for four one-hour sessions. In each session, the panel will review the genomic and clinical evidence for anonymized patients who have had their tumors sequenced as part of clinical management. The panel will discuss each case and recommend a course of treatment.

Precision Oncology News would like to thank Clariifi for assistance in planning and executing this educational webinar series.

Sponsored by

Professor, Microbiology, Immunology & Pathology, Director, Molecular Quantification Core, Director, Cell & Molecular Biology Graduate Program, Colorado State University

Associate Professor, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Colorado State University

Chief Medical Research Officer, Colorado State University

Wastewater based epidemiology (WBE) has been established as a viable, valuable, and cost-effective means to monitor infectious disease within a community. 

In this webinar, a team of scientists from Colorado State University (CSU) will describe their experiences building a successful wastewater surveillance system from the ground up for use as a state-wide system to monitor viral loads in wastewater. 

The CSU team worked with GTMolecular to develop and validate a method to concentrate and extract SARS-CoV-2 RNA from wastewater samples provided by wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) or collected from sewers on the CSU campus. Levels of SARS-CoV-2 are quantified using digital droplet PCR assays.

Using this method, the CSU team tracked trends in viral load over time for 21 Colorado WWTPs and connected this information to the area covered by each WWTP to inform public health decisions. They also monitored SARS-CoV-2 in wastewater from 20 locations, including CSU dormitories and off-campus shared living facilities. 

The CSU scientists will discuss how this micro-surveillance approach allowed scarce testing resources to be allocated where risk was highest, helped detect outbreaks early through directed clinical testing of residents, and identified targets for compliance efforts. 

They will also describe the interface of wastewater surveillance with university and local public health initiatives and speculate as to the future for WBE in detecting and curbing infectious disease outbreaks.

Sponsored by

Postdoctoral Fellow, Department of Pathology
School of Medicine, Stanford University

Metabolism drives cell behavior, including immune cell activation, differentiation, and effector functions. However, current technologies for the analysis of cellular metabolism lack single-cell resolution and simultaneous characterization of cellular phenotype.

In this webinar, Felix J. Hartmann of Stanford University will describe an approach that characterizes the metabolic regulome of individual cells together with their phenotypic identity. The method, termed single-cell metabolic regulome profiling (scMEP), quantifies proteins that regulate metabolic pathway activity using high-dimensional antibody-based technologies. Dr. Hartmann and colleagues employed single-cell approaches to benchmark scMEP against bulk metabolic assays by reconstructing the metabolic remodeling of in vitro-activated naive and memory CD8+ T cells.

Combining this method with multiplexed ion beam imaging by time of flight (MIBI-TOF), Dr. Hartmann’s team uncovered the spatial organization of metabolic programs in human tissues, which indicated the existence of metabolic niches and exclusion of metabolically repressed immune cells from the tumor–immune boundary.

Dr. Hartmann will discuss how this approach enables robust approximation of metabolic and functional states in individual cells and tissues.

Sponsored by
Thu
Mar
18
11:00 am2021
Sponsored by
Thermo Fisher Scientific

Molecular Multi-Target Assay Design Coupled with Reflex Testing with SARS-CoV-2 Mutations in Mind

GenomeWebinar

Professor in Microbial Evolutionary Genomics, University of Birmingham
Infectious Disease Lead for the Milton Keynes Lighthouse Lab UK

Professor of Medicine at KU Leuven, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Co-Director Infectious Diseases Centre
University Hospital of Leuven

Senior Medical Director
Thermo Fisher Scientific

Viruses mutate as they strive to thrive in response to selective pressures. For molecular diagnostic assays to serve in the management of viral transmission, they need to be designed anticipating the emergence of mutations.

This webinar will focus on the impact of emerging viral variants of SARS-CoV-2 on molecular diagnostic testing. In the first part of the session, Dr. Alan McNally will share how the B.1.1.7 variant was discovered in the United Kingdom, highlight the role played by a molecular diagnostic assay in its detection, and discuss design principles that aid in the development of effective and robust molecular diagnostic assays. In addition, Dr. McNally will discuss some of the clinical data associated with the B.1.1.7 strain as well as the importance of early identification of this variant of concern.

In the second part of the session, Dr. Emmanuel André will discuss his approach to identifying specific SARS-CoV-2 variants using a targeted mutation panel as a reflex test following a suspect clinical variant result. Dr. Andre will provide details about the mutation panel composition as well as the advantages of using this approach for wide-scale SARS-CoV-2 surveillance.

Learning Objectives:

  • Hear the story of detecting the B.1.1.7 variant (UK variant) from a world-leading epidemiologist.
  • Understand the importance of early detection of viral variants and the impact of emerging variants on global response efforts.
  • Learn about molecular diagnostic assay design principles to safeguard against unexpected false results due to mutations and the means to monitor assays as early indicators of emerging variants.
  • Learn about the S-gene advantage with B.1.1.7, the role of the S-gene dropout, and the value of a targeted mutation panel as a reflex tool as follow up for a suspected clinical variant.
Sponsored by

Assistant Professor of Radiation Oncology,
Washington University

This webinar will discuss findings from the study, in which molecular residual disease (MRD) was assessed using circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) without prior mutational knowledge in oligometastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) patients who had received neoadjuvant chemotherapy. This study also investigated urine as an alternative analyte for ctDNA MRD detection.

Dr. Aadel Chaudhuri of Washington University will share details of the study, which applied Avenio targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) *to plasma, tumor and urine samples acquired on the day of curative-intent surgery from prospectively enrolled oligometastatic CRC patients.

The study demonstrated that tumor-naïve plasma ctDNA analysis can sensitively and specifically detect MRD in patients with oligometastatic CRC after neoadjuvant chemotherapy, while urine-based ctDNA MRD detection is less sensitive than plasma. Dr. Chaudhuri will discuss these findings in detail.

* For Research Use Only.  Not for use in diagnostic procedures.

Sponsored by

Staff Scientist in the Department of Pathology,
St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis

This webinar, the first in a “Women in Single Cell” series sponsored by Mission Bio, will discuss the use of single-cell analysis to assess genome editing for use in pre-clinical disease modeling.

Our invited speaker, Ilaria Iacobucci of St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, will discuss the benefits of using single-cell analysis to quantify and characterize genome editing experiments.

In particular, she will discuss a study she co-authored that was published in Blood, “Modeling and targeting of erythroleukemia by hematopoietic genome editing,” in which she developed faithful experimental models of  acute erythroid leukemia (AEL) in mice by multiplex genome editing of recurrently co-mutated genes.

As part of this work, Dr. Iacobucci and colleagues used single-cell analysis determine mutational co-occurrence and sequence of acquisition of multiple tumor stages, identifying primary and secondary mutations that promote clonal fitness and genesis of the leukemic phenotype.

Dr. Iacobucci’s presentation will be followed by a live audience Q&A that will discuss this work as well as her experience as a pioneering woman in single-cell research.

Sponsored by
Thu
Mar
25
1:00 pm2021
Sponsored by
Foundation Medicine

Virtual Molecular Tumor Board Series: What to Do with a ‘Negative’ Molecular Panel Case

GenomeWebinar

Medical Director, Precision Medicine;
Geriatric Oncology Consortium

Chief, Precision Health and Genomics,
Intermountain Healthcare

Research Scientist, Personalized Medicine Specialist,
DeBartolo Family Personalized Medicine Institute, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center

Co-Director, Oncology Precision Medicine Program,
Aurora Health Care

Lead Variant Scientist,
Intermountain Healthcare

In this session, the fourth in the Precision Oncology News Virtual Molecular Tumor Board Series, our expert panelists will review patient cases in which genomic profiling identified no clear molecular markers to help guide personalized therapy.

The application of comprehensive genomic profiling (CGP) in patients with metastatic solid tumors aims to identify therapeutic options that were not otherwise evident with standard workup. However, CGP -- even when it analyzes patient samples against 500+ potential mutations — does not always identify an actionable target.  In these cases, clinicians still need to develop a care plan based on best evidence and individual patient goals.

Our panel will discuss several of these cases in detail and recommend next steps.

The session will wrap up with a live Q&A in which attendees can discuss the cases with the Virtual Molecular Tumor Board panelists.

About The Series

The Virtual Molecular Tumor Board Series is an interactive and educational online program intended to highlight the key role that molecular tumor boards play in implementing precision oncology.

The series will underscore the collaborative nature of genomic medicine by assembling a multidisciplinary panel of experts who will meet virtually for four one-hour sessions. In each session, the panel will review the genomic and clinical evidence for anonymized patients who have had their tumors sequenced as part of clinical management. The panel will discuss each case and recommend a course of treatment.

Precision Oncology News would like to thank Clariifi for assistance in planning and executing this educational webinar series.


Sponsored by

Professor, Epidemiology; Director, Infectious Disease Epidemiology Certificate Program
Columbia University Medical Center

Assistant Professor-Clinical in the Department of Pathology, Associate Director of the Molecular Pathology Laboratory
Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center

Senior Medical Director
Thermo Fisher Scientific

Global genetic surveillance is vital for understanding the evolution of viral pathogens and monitoring for changes in transmissibility, virulence, disease pathology, and impact on the efficacy of diagnostic tests, therapeutics, and vaccines. As such, global surveillance plays a central role in proactively managing pathogens such as SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. 

Similarly, local genetic surveillance offers an opportunity to understand the evolution of the virus in the community and take actions to manage transmission and monitor evolution at the local level. Robust data about which strains are common, where they are spreading, how their symptoms differ, when new variants are emerging, and more can enable communities, states and countries to better prepare for their arrival. 

Vaccine and test manufacturers are guided by this information as well, cutting weeks or even months from any response they need to make. Genetic surveillance already exists on a large scale to enable scientists to determine which influenza strains are appropriate targets for each year’s flu vaccines, and a similar effort will be needed to make sense of SARS-CoV-2 and its evolving strains.

This webinar will focus on genetic surveillance of the emerging variants of SARS-CoV-2, provide an update on the trending variants, explain the risks of the rise of escape mutants, and outline best practices to establish both global and local surveillance programs, including technologies used for monitoring viral evolution, such as next-generation sequencing.

Learning Objectives:

  • Hear from a leading expert in infectious disease epidemiology regarding emerging variants of SARS-CoV-2.
  • Receive up-to-date information on the state of emerging variants, the impact of selective pressures, and the associated evolutionary advantage conferred to the virus.
  • Learn about best practices in standing up global and community surveillance efforts.
  • Hear from a thought leader in molecular pathology who harnessed his expertise in molecular genetics to contribute to surveillance efforts on a local level.
Sponsored by
Wed
Mar
31
1:00 pm2021
Sponsored by
MilliporeSigma

Development and Commercialization of a Novel CRISPR-Based SARS CoV-2 Test

GenomeWebinar

VP, Product Development,
Mammoth Biosciences

Head of Strategic Implementation & Marketing – CMO,
MilliporeSigma

This webinar will outline the development and commercialization journey of a novel CRISPR-based SARS-CoV-2 test. 

Mammoth Biosciences developed the test in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. The company was one of one of seven chosen to receive funding through the National Institutes of Health’s RADx program to support development and commercialization of the test.  

Tim Patno, vice president of product development at Mammoth Biosciences, will discuss Mammoth’s novel CRISPR-based technology as well as the company’s partnership with MilliporeSigma to manufacture its DETECTR BOOST SARS-CoV-2 Reagent Kit. Patno will discuss the steps Mammoth took to vet and choose a manufacturing partner within the context of commercializing a novel in vitro diagnostic.

Attendees will learn:

  • The basic technology and platform of the CRISPR-based SARS-CoV-2 DETECTR test.
  • The steps in the commercialization process of an IVD; from scope of work through to development, engineering, validation, and closing.
  • Advantages of working with a commercial partner to expedite kit development and launch.

 

Sponsored by

Senior Scientist
Medical University of Graz

Genomics is central to the precision oncology cascade. After tissue or blood is subjected to next-generation sequencing (NGS) and bioinformatics analysis, the alterations detected must be annotated and interpreted within the context of the individual patient.

This webinar will discuss a single-center prospective interventional study that evaluated the success of a targeted therapy selected by profiling of ctDNA and tissue in patients with advanced and refractory carcinoma.

Samantha Hasenleithner of the Medical University of Graz will discuss the approach, which reflects a true clinical scenario in which both plasma and tissue analytes help inform treatment decisions. Nevertheless, this workflow poses challenges for clinicians in selecting the appropriate treatment.

Clinical decision support may help streamline these variant interpretation and treatment matching workflows, and Dr. Hasenleithner will discuss an evaluation of three such tools and her team’s experience with the Navify Mutation Profiler*.

*For Research Use Only.  Not for use in diagnostic procedures in the US.

Sponsored by
Thu
Apr
22
1:00 pm2021
Sponsored by
10x Genomics

Single-Cell Genomics Decodes the Developing Human Immune System

GenomeWebinar

Wellcome Trust Senior Research Fellow, Lister Institute Research Fellow, and Consultant Dermatologist,
Newcastle University

The human immune system is extremely complex, comprised of multiple cell types and states interacting in myriad ways to produce diverse cellular ecosystems. The rise of single-cell genomics in recent years has contributed a great deal to understanding this complexity and the role of the immune system in infection, inflammation, and disease.

In this webinar, Muzlifah Haniffa of Newcastle University will demonstrate the application of single-cell genomics to decode the developing human immune system. In particular, she will discuss her work using single-cell RNA sequencing to study human fetal liver haematopoiesis and developing and adult skin.

Prof. Haniffa will discuss this work within her broader research goal of understanding how developmental immune programs may be co-opted in post-natal disease. A detailed understanding of the developing immune system is also relevant to improve stem cell therapy and regenerative medicine.

Sponsored by