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GenomeWebinars

Professor and Associate Chair, Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences
Adjunct Professor, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering,
University of Washington

Associate Professor of Environmental Engineering,
Clarkson University

Assistant Research Professor, Environmental Science,
University of Arizona

Assistant Adjunct Professor, Biomolecular Engineering,
Jack Baskin School of Engineering, University of California, Santa Cruz

Detection and quantification of SARS-CoV-2 levels in wastewater can be a useful predictor of potential COVID-19 outbreaks. However, the interpretation of the surveillance data can be challenging. Join us as our panel of experts discuss the use of wastewater surveillance for SARS-CoV-2 for different communities and how that data is being used for early detection and risk mitigation.

The panel will also share their thoughts on what role wastewater-based epidemiology will play in the COVID-19 pandemic post-vaccination.

Topics to be covered in the discussion include:

  • Benefits and challenges of wastewater-based epidemiology
  • How different communities are leveraging monitoring data
  • The importance of biomarker and control selection
  • How cross-community datasets can be leveraged for post-vaccine disease monitoring
Sponsored by
Fri
Apr
16
1:00 pm2021
Sponsored by
Thermo Fisher Scientific

The Post-Vaccine COVID Testing Landscape: A Virtual Roundtable Discussion

GenomeWebinar

Senior Scientific Director and Head of R&D, 
Quest Diagnostics Infectious Disease

Professor and Vice Chair, Pathology; Medical Director, Molecular Diagnostics
Froedtert Hospital & Medical College of Wisconsin

Professor of Practice, Arizona State University
Managing Director, BlueStone Venture Partners

Director, Infectious Disease, Association of Public Health Laboratories

With COVID-19 vaccines rolling out, clinical labs and test developers are preparing for changes in both demand for testing and types of testing for SARS-CoV-2.

When vaccines are broadly implemented and SARS-CoV-2 positivity rates are lower, pooled testing may become more widespread as a means to prevent future outbreaks. There may also be greater adoption of serology tests to monitor people who have been vaccinated, as well as the potential for more decentralized testing. Furthermore, clinical labs and test developers will need to adjust for increases in testing volumes for segments that were neglected during the pandemic.

This virtual roundtable discussion will assemble a panel of industry stakeholders, including clinical and public labs, to discuss how they are planning for a post-vaccine testing landscape.

The session will include a live Q&A in which attendees can post questions to our panelists.

Sponsored by

Director of Data Science
Health Science Data Lab, Institute for Systems Biology

This webinar will discuss a study that sought to identify early biomarkers for cancer by analyzing pre-diagnosis samples from seemingly healthy individuals who were later diagnosed with cancer.

Andrew Magis of the Institute for Systems Biology will share details of the study, which used the Olink platform to analyze 1,196 proteins in longitudinal plasma samples from participants in a commercial wellness program, including samples collected pre-diagnosis from ten cancer patients and 69 controls.

The study found that for three individuals ultimately diagnosed with metastatic breast, lung, or pancreatic cancer, CEACAM5 was a persistent longitudinal outlier as early as 26.5 months pre-diagnosis. Meanwhile, CALCA, a biomarker for medullary thyroid cancer, was hypersecreted in metastatic pancreatic cancer at least 16.5 months pre-diagnosis. Another marker, ERBB2, spiked in metastatic breast cancer between 10 and four months pre-diagnosis.

Dr. Magis will discuss how these results support the value of deep phenotyping seemingly healthy individuals in order to prospectively infer disease transitions.

Sponsored by
Wed
Apr
21
1:00 pm2021
Sponsored by
Mission Bio

Single-cell Multiomics Analysis of Clonal Evolution in Myeloid Malignancies

GenomeWebinar

Laurence Joseph Dineen Chair in Leukemia Research,
Chief, Molecular Cancer Medicine Service, HOPP
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

This webinar, the first in a “Meet the Authors” series sponsored by Mission Bio, will discuss the application of single-cell analysis to decipher clonal evolution across several stages of disease development in myeloid malignancies. 

Our invited speaker, Dr. Ross Levine of Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, will discuss his study published in Nature, “Single-cell mutation analysis of clonal evolution in myeloid malignancies,” which provides insights into the pathogenesis of myeloid transformation and how clonal complexity evolves with disease progression.

As part of this work, Dr. Levine’s lab performed single-cell DNA sequencing on 146 samples from 123 patients with clonal hematopoiesis, myeloproliferative neoplasms, and/or acute myeloid leukemia to delineate mutations at single clone resolution and map out the clonal complexity of each indication. Furthermore, they combined cell-surface protein expression with mutational analysis to correlate genotype and immunophenotype. 

Dr. Levine will talk about the benefits of using single-cell analysis to elucidate clonal evolution, including the ability to distinguish which mutations occur in the same clone(s), accurately measure clonal complexity, and definitively determine the order of mutations.

Dr. Ross Levine’s presentation will be followed by a live audience Q&A. 

Sponsored by
Thu
Apr
22
1:00 pm2021
Sponsored by
10x Genomics

Single-Cell Genomics Decodes the Developing Human Immune System

GenomeWebinar

Wellcome Trust Senior Research Fellow, Lister Institute Research Fellow, and Consultant Dermatologist,
Newcastle University

The human immune system is extremely complex, comprised of multiple cell types and states interacting in myriad ways to produce diverse cellular ecosystems. The rise of single-cell genomics in recent years has contributed a great deal to understanding this complexity and the role of the immune system in infection, inflammation, and disease.

In this webinar, Muzlifah Haniffa of Newcastle University will demonstrate the application of single-cell genomics to decode the developing human immune system. In particular, she will discuss her work using single-cell RNA sequencing to study human fetal liver haematopoiesis and developing and adult skin.

Prof. Haniffa will discuss this work within her broader research goal of understanding how developmental immune programs may be co-opted in post-natal disease. A detailed understanding of the developing immune system is also relevant to improve stem cell therapy and regenerative medicine.

Sponsored by

Professor of Biomedical Engineering,
Yale University

Senior Scientist,
Genentech

Senior Staff Scientist and Team Leader, Integrative Omics group;
Biological Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Professor, Department of Pathology,
Stanford University School of Medicine

Director, Single-Cell Proteomics Center & Assistant Professor, Bioengineering;
Northeastern University, College of Engineering

Professor for Quantitative Biomedicine,
University of Zurich

Recent advances in single-cell technologies have provided unprecedented -omic-level insights into cellular heterogeneity and function. Methods for single-cell genomic, transcriptomic, and epigenomic studies are emerging at a rapid pace and contributing to a better understanding of the complexity of biological systems.

Single-cell proteomics promises to build a much more complete picture of cellular identity, because proteins directly carry out cellular function. But the field faces many challenges, largely due to the lack of direct amplification that is possible with nucleic acids. 

This Virtual Roundtable discussion will bring together a panel of experts in the field of single-cell proteomics to discuss the latest advances in the field and obstacles to its progress. They will also discuss the role of single-cell proteomics within the context of emerging integrative disciplines, such as single-cell multiomics studies and spatial biology.

Sponsored by

Medical Oncologist,
Gustave Roussy Institute

Scientific Project Manager,
Biognosys 

This webinar, the first in our Next-Generation Proteomics for Precision Oncology series, will discuss how proteomics can help overcome the challenges of treating COVID-19 patients with oncologic comorbidities.

Recent advances in mass spectrometry-based proteomics have fostered a more precise, deep, and more functional look into clinical phenotypes. Going beyond traditional genomics, proteomics enables more relevant, quantitative, and informative understanding of diseases and treatments.

Jean-Marie Michot, a medical oncologist at Gustave Roussy Institute and Vito Dozio, Scientific Project Manager at Biognosys, will share a study that illustrates the promise of proteomics in understanding responses to new therapies such as anti-IL-6-based treatment and the impact of comorbidities on clinical outcomes.

They will discuss the results of a joint project in which serum from a cohort of patients infected with COVID-19 was submitted for analysis using the Biognosys HRM discovery proteomics platform. They will share details of proteomic profiles associated with clinical outcome, comorbidities, and the response to anti-IL6 treatment, which provide a comprehensive picture of the potential of using next-generation proteomics to enhance personalized medicine. 

About The Series: Next-Generation Proteomics for Precision Oncology

This webinar series will highlight recent advancements in the proteomics field and the impact of proteomics on clinical research in oncology.

Sponsored by

Professor of Pediatrics,
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Single-cell omics assays have become essential tools for identifying and characterizing cell types and states of complex tissues. While each single-modality assay reveals distinctive features about the sequenced cells, true multiomics assays are still in the early stage of development.  

This underscores the importance of computationally integrating single-cell omics data from studies conducted on various samples across various modalities. In addition, the advent of multiplexed molecular imaging assays has given rise to a need for computational methods for integrative analysis of single-cell imaging and omics data. 

In this webinar, Kai Tan of the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania will discuss GLUER (Integrative Analysis of Multiomics at Single-Cell Resolution), a flexible tool for integration of single-cell multi-omics data and imaging data. 

In this talk attendees will: 

  • Learn about a general computational framework (GLUER) for integrating single-cell omics and imaging data
  • Hear strategies to evaluate performance of data integration methods
  • See the utility of integration methods for understanding cell-cell communication

About the Series: Spatial Multiomics: Analysis Strategies for Enriching Single-Cell Phenotyping Data

In this multi-part webinar series, our expert speakers will review analytical frameworks and algorithms to integrate imaging-based single-cell spatial phenotyping data with complementary transcriptomic and genomic datasets.

High-plex cell phenotyping methods like single-cell RNA-seq capture the deep cellular heterogeneity of samples, but cell behavior is a function of all that surrounds it. Imaging-based spatial phenotyping platforms enable researchers to visualize and analyze cell diversity, interactive networks, and cellular behavior within the spatial context of whole tissue sections. Both types of data have complementary features, which give researchers the ability to merge information about a cell’s proteome and transcriptome with its single-cell, spatial context.

This webinar series will highlight the latest advances driving integrative multiomics analysis.


Sponsored by

Chief Scientific Officer
Clinical Reference Laboratory

Senior Design Engineer
Co-Diagnostics

Join Dr. Heather Fehling, Chief Scientific Officer at Clinical Reference Labs (CRL), as she provides some insights regarding the future applications of PCR testing.

CRL recently announced a partnership with Walgreens, offering consumers the convenience of self-collecting COVID-19 saliva tests in their own homes without supervision. Dr. Fehling will detail some of the ways she has been able to adapt her labs to usher in a new era of accessible PCR testing.

Accompanying Dr. Fehling will be Masen Christensen, Senior Design Engineer at Co-Diagnostics, who is responsible for ongoing in silico inclusivity and exclusivity analyses used by the CRL/Walgreens partnership and for monitoring all strains and mutations of SARS-CoV-2.

Christensen will summarize the results of these analyses and outline how to achieve high levels of specificity in saliva PCR by virtually eliminating primer-dimers and the necessity for a fluorescent probe by using the CoPrimer structure developed by Co-Diagnostics.

Attendees of this webinar will learn:

  • How Clinical Reference Labs is able to provide non-invasive and highly accurate saliva PCR tests for at-home collection
  • The results of ongoing in silico inclusivity and exclusivity analyses on COVID-19 mutations and emerging strains
  • How new PCR science and technology is enabling and expanding the applications and accessibility of PCR tests
Sponsored by

Assistant Professor of Genetics,
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

This webinar is part 2 of a 4 part webinar series.

Recently developed technologies for digital imaging and highly multiplexed immunohistochemistry (mIHC) advancing the field of histology into a quantitative era, allowing for more complex descriptions of tissue architecture.

Imaging cytometry by time of flight (CyTOF), multiplexed ion beam imaging, and co-detection by indexing (CODEX) can be used to simultaneously profile the expression of dozens of proteins in a tissue section with single-cell resolution. However, annotating cell populations or states that differ little in the profiled antigens or for which the antibody panel does not include specific markers is challenging.

This webinar will present a computational approach that was developed to overcome this obstacle. Spatially resolved Transcriptomics via Epitope Anchoring (STvEA) enriches mIHC images with single-cell RNA-seq data, building upon recent experimental procedures for augmenting single-cell transcriptomes with concurrent antigen measurements such as CITE-seq (Cellular Indexing of Transcriptomes and Epitopes by Sequencing).

Pablo G. Camara of the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania will share details of STvEA, which performs transcriptome-guided annotation of highly multiplexed cytometry datasets.

Dr. Camara will demonstrate the utility of STvEA by uncovering the architecture of poorly characterized cell types in the murine spleen using published CODEX and CyTOF datasets, and a CITE-seq atlas of the murine spleen that his team has generated. 

In this talk attendees will: 

  • Learn about current challenges in the analysis of mIHC images 
  • Understand the concept of STvEA and the algorithmic steps involved 
  • Get familiarized with the computational analyses enabled by STvEA 
  • See several examples of the application of STvEA

About the Series: Spatial Multiomics: Analysis Strategies for Enriching Single-Cell Phenotyping Data

In this multi-part webinar series, our expert speakers will review analytical frameworks and algorithms to integrate imaging-based single-cell spatial phenotyping data with complementary transcriptomic and genomic datasets.

High-plex cell phenotyping methods like single-cell RNA-seq capture the deep cellular heterogeneity of samples, but cell behavior is a function of all that surrounds it. Imaging-based spatial phenotyping platforms enable researchers to visualize and analyze cell diversity, interactive networks, and cellular behavior within the spatial context of whole tissue sections. Both types of data have complementary features, which give researchers the ability to merge information about a cell’s proteome and transcriptome with its single-cell, spatial context.

This webinar series will highlight the latest advances driving integrative multiomics analysis.

Sponsored by
Wed
May
5
6:00 pm2021
Sponsored by
Illumina

Establishing a Pharmacogenomic Service for Routine Clinical Care

GenomeWebinar

Principal Research Fellow, Bioinformatics
Queensland University of Technology

Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are responsible for around 5 percent of hospital admissions and occur in 6 percent to 15 percent of hospital stays. Approximately 30 percent of ADRs are caused by drugs with a known major clinically significant pharmacogenomic variant, meaning that nearly one-third of adverse drug-related admissions may be predictable – and thus preventable - by pharmacogenomic (PGx) testing.

This webinar will review the introduction of pharmacogenomic testing into settings where it is likely to be particularly clinically relevant. Paul Leo of Queensland University of Technology will discuss a project that aimed to provide pre-emptive rather than reactive testing in the clinical setting by using rapid genomic technologies and information management integrated into the hospital electronic medical record. This vision required development of a PGx knowledge center and a clinical support database as well as the validation of new technologies to improve cost-effective PGx measurements.

The presentation will focus on the implementation of these goals as well as the challenges of introducing new genomic testing into routine clinical care.

Sponsored by

Postdoctoral Fellow
Stanford University School of Medicine

This webinar is part 3 of a 4 part webinar series.

Integrating complementary data sets provides a powerful tool to study complex biological processes. This webinar will focus on the use of CODEX (Co-Detection by Indexing) spatial proteomic data in parallel with CITE-seq (Cellular Indexing of Transcriptomes and Epitopes by Sequencing) data to study tissue regeneration and aging.

The integration of CITE-seq data, where antibodies used in the CODEX system are also captured by droplet-based single-cell sequencing, allows for the multiomic projection of transcriptomic information onto the spatial information of the CODEX System. This multi-omic approach enables the study of cell-cell signaling by assessing relationships between cell types across the tissue and provides a deeper understanding of the biology at play in tissue regeneration and aging.

In this talk attendees will:

  • Learn about the use of multiplex imaging to study spatial dynamics of skeletal muscle regeneration and molecular determinants of aging

  • Understand how to design and align CITE-seq experiments to enrich CODEX data

See how to use single-cell resolution spatial transcriptomes to assess cell-cell signaling

About the Series: Spatial Multiomics: Analysis Strategies for Enriching Single-Cell Phenotyping Data

In this multi-part webinar series, our expert speakers will review analytical frameworks and algorithms to integrate imaging-based single-cell spatial phenotyping data with complementary transcriptomic and genomic datasets.

High-plex cell phenotyping methods like single-cell RNA-seq capture the deep cellular heterogeneity of samples, but cell behavior is a function of all that surrounds it. Imaging-based spatial phenotyping platforms enable researchers to visualize and analyze cell diversity, interactive networks, and cellular behavior across whole tissue sections. Both types of data have complementary features, which give researchers the ability to merge information about a cell’s proteome and transcriptome with its single-cell, spatial context.

This webinar series will highlight the latest advances driving integrative multiomics analysis. 

Sponsored by

Head of the Department of General Intensive Care,
Rabin Medical Center’s Hasharon Hospital

Professor of Emergency Medicine, 
Maimonides Medical Center  

Co-Founder and CEO,
MeMed

Amid the COVID-19 pandemic, hospitals and intensive care units around the world have been overwhelmed by unprecedented levels of demand. Clinicians face the difficult challenge of patient prioritization, identifying which patients to admit and how to effectively triage them within emergency room and hospital settings, and which patients can safely get the care they need at home, in isolation. 

Accurately predicting which COVID-19 patients are at risk of severe disease and deterioration, as well as personalized management of critically ill patients, remains challenging due to the heterogeneous nature of the virus and the limitations of available diagnostic tools. Today, however, novel host immune response technologies are yielding clues on how to best triage COVID-19 patients, showing promise in changing the paradigm in acute care patient management. 

Please join 360Dx and MeMed for a discussion with a panel of international experts on recent advances in the technologies used to probe the host immune response to infections, including COVID-19. Panelists will share new research and insights from their experiences on how predictive biomarkers – and the actionable information they provide – can potentially be used in clinical practice to enable more accurate, rapid diagnoses and timely interventions that can help reduce ICU admissions, the need for ventilation and, ultimately, mortality.

This discussion will cover: 

●      Recent prospective data on the potential utility of a host immune signature, which combines three biomarkers (TRAIL, IP-10, CRP), as a valuable resource for predicting disease severity and progression; 

●      How utilizing IP-10 as a biomarker in real-world settings can aid in monitoring inflammatory status and personalizing treatment strategies for patients with severe COVID-19; 

●      The applications of host immune response technologies in easing the burdens on healthcare systems presented by COVID-19 as well as future pandemics.

Sponsored by

Professor of Pediatrics,
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Assistant Professor of Genetics,
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Postdoctoral Fellow,
Stanford University School of Medicine

Senior Manager, Applications,
Akoya Biosciences

This webinar, which caps off our 4 part Spatial Multiomics Webinar Series, gathers speakers from prior events in the series to discuss the challenges and benefits of integrating imaging-based single-cell spatial phenotyping data with complementary transcriptomic and genomic datasets.

Our expert panelists will review their own strategies for addressing the challenges of integrative multiomic analysis and will share best practices for this rapidly evolving field.

The discussion will be moderated by Dr. Oliver Braubach of Akoya Biosciences and will conclude with a live Q&A in which attendees can post questions to our panelists.

About the Series: Spatial Multiomics: Analysis Strategies for Enriching Single-Cell Phenotyping Data

In this multi-part webinar series, our expert speakers will review analytical frameworks and algorithms to integrate imaging-based single-cell spatial phenotyping data with complementary transcriptomic and genomic datasets.

High-plex cell phenotyping methods like single-cell RNA-seq capture the deep cellular heterogeneity of samples, but cell behavior is a function of all that surrounds it. Imaging-based spatial phenotyping platforms enable researchers to visualize and analyze cell diversity, interactive networks, and cellular behavior across whole tissue sections. Both types of data have complementary features, which give researchers the ability to merge information about a cell’s proteome and transcriptome with its single-cell, spatial context.

This webinar series will highlight the latest advances driving integrative multiomics analysis.

Sponsored by

Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Emergency Surgery
Stanford University School of Medicine

This webinar will discuss a recent study that characterized the relationships between SARS-CoV-2 RNAemia and disease severity, clinical deterioration, and extrapulmonary complications (EPCs).

While the determinants of COVID-19 disease severity and EPCs are poorly understood, the varied clinical manifestations of COVID-19 have directed attention to the distribution of SARS-CoV-2 in the body. Although SARS-CoV-2 RNA is most concentrated in the nasopharynx, it has also been found in numerous other tissues, raising questions about dissemination of viral RNA throughout the body as well as the role of this process in disease severity and extrapulmonary complications.  Recent studies have detected low levels of SARS-CoV-2 RNA in blood and have associated RNAemia with disease severity and biomarkers of dysregulated immune response. 

In this webinar, Dr. Nikhil Ram Mohan, a postdoctoral scholar in the Department of Emergency Medicine at Stanford University, will discuss a study that used an array-based dPCR platform to detect and quantify SARS-CoV-2 RNA in specimens collected from the nasopharynx and from plasma of patients diagnosed with COVID-19.

He will discuss how variation in SARS-CoV-2 RNAemia may help explain disparities in disease severity and EPCs from COVID-19 as well as how using digital PCR to test for RNAemia early in the course of illness may help guide patient triage and management.

Sponsored by
Thu
May
13
11:00 am2021
Sponsored by
LGC SeraCare Life Sciences

Limits of Detection Matter: New Challenges for SARS-CoV-2 Diagnostics and COVID-19 Patient Management

GenomeWebinar

Medical Director, Clinical Microbiology Laboratory
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Chief Scientific Officer
LGC SeraCare Life Sciences

As we pass the one-year anniversary of both the COVID-19 pandemic and the first Emergency Use Authorized SARS-CoV-2 PCR detection assays, there remains significant opportunity for clinical laboratories to advance testing and support improved patient management.

In this webinar, James Kirby, Director of the Clinical Microbiology Laboratory at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, will discuss his lab’s experience establishing quantitative SARS-CoV-2 viral load testing, the clinical relevance of limits of detection and viral load, and the need to benchmark against a universal standard to allow cross-comparison of SARS-CoV-2 detection methods. He will also discuss the importance of validating the clinical sensitivity of SARS-CoV-2 testing platforms.  

Russell Garlick, Chief Scientific Officer LGC SeraCare, will present the technologies used to advance reference materials for assay standardization.

The webinar will include a 15-minute Q&A session. 

Sponsored by

Associate Professor and Director of the Molecular Analysis Core,
SUNY Upstate Medical University

This webinar will present the details of a COVID-19 saliva screening program that has been implemented at more than 90 different colleges, universities, private schools, and nursing homes across New York state.  

Dr. Frank Middleton of SUNY (State University of New York) Upstate Medical University has helped direct weekly saliva screening for this program since August 202. This has translated into performing more than a million tests to date, often exceeding 20,000 tests per day. Dr. Middleton has also been actively engaged in monitoring for the emergence of mutations in the testing network using whole-genome viral sequencing. 

In this webinar, Dr. Middleton will provide an overview of the process involved in taking an idea for a better qPCR assay from the bench to the bedside and beyond, in the effort to help reduce the spread of SARS-CoV-2. 

Dr. Middleton will also review lessons learned from the US Food and Drug Administration Emergency Use Authorization process, as well as best practices for resource and logistical management of a state-wide surveillance operation. 

Sponsored by
Wed
May
19
12:00 pm2021
Sponsored by
Qiagen

Uncovering Genomic Evidence of SARS-CoV-2 Infection and Reinfection

GenomeWebinar

Principal
Theiagen Consulting

Associate Director, Global Product Management, Biomedical Genomics
Qiagen

Is it possible to become reinfected with SARS-CoV-2? If so, how can we identify and confirm reinfection?  What tools can we use to better identify prevalent and emerging strains of SARS-CoV-2?

Joel Sevinsky, Principal at Theiagen Consulting, is an expert in bioinformatics in the public health space and coauthor of a recent paper exploring the genomics evidence for reinfection with SARS-CoV-2 that was published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases. In this webinar, Dr. Sevinsky will discuss:

  • How next-generation sequencing (NGS) and off-the-shelf software confirmed the first documented SARS-CoV-2 reinfection case in the United States;
  • How bioinformatics analysis strongly supports the hypothesis that the patient was infected on two separate occasions by genetically distinct viruses;
  • The rationale for the continued use of NGS-based approaches for analysis and surveillance of SARS-CoV-2 samples.

Leif Schauser, Global Product Manager at Qiagen Digital Insights, will discuss recent product developments at Qiagen that support the detection, NGS analysis, and interpretation SARS-CoV-2-positive samples, including stain typing.  He will discuss solutions that range from Qiagen cloud-based services to scalable applications for on-premises analyses.

Sponsored by

PhD Student,
University of British Columbia, Cembrowski Lab

This webinar will present a research project that is using spatial transcriptomics to discern the molecular mechanisms underlying fear memory.  

Kaitlin Sullivan of the University of British Columbia will discuss how she is using multiplexed, fluorescent RNA in situ hybridization (mFISH) based on the RNAscope technology to assess neuronal activity during the creation and recollection of fear memory.

The presentation will cover:

  • The use of mFISH to spatially resolve transcriptomically unique neuronal subpopulations.
  • How to computationally analyze images and quantify expression at single-cell, single-molecule resolution.
  • How to pair mFISH with morphological, circuit, and functional information to get a holistic view of cell types across multiple spatial scales.
Sponsored by

Scientist,
Research Institute of Molecular Pathology

The emergence of cell clones that are resistant to targeted therapies poses a significant issue in the treatment of metastatic melanoma. While founding clones are often extremely rare in a starting population, their isolation and characterization hold unique potential for understanding disease processes, uncovering novel biomarkers, and developing therapeutic concepts. 

In this webinar, Christian Umkehrer of Vienna’s Research Institute of Molecular Pathology describes the development and application of CaTCH (CRISPRa Tracing of Clones in Heterogeneous Cell Populations), which combines precise mapping of the lineage history of millions of cells with the ability to isolate any given clone alive from a complex population based on genetic barcodes. 

CaTCH enables the retrospective isolation and analysis of founding clones from heterogeneous cell populations prior to evolutionary selection. The approach uses QuantSeq 3’ mRNA-Seq to characterize the isolated clones by efficiently profiling gene expression.

In his presentation Christian Umkehrer will explain how CaTCH can:

  • be used to trace and isolate therapy-resistant clones from complex cancer cell populations in vitro.
  • be applied to in vivo studies by investigating the origins of resistance to clinically relevant RAF/MEK inhibition in an immunocompetent melanoma mouse model.
  • address further fundamental questions in basic and translational research (e.g., how cell identity states and trajectories are determined in therapy resistance, metastasis formation, or somatic cell re-programming).
Sponsored by

Director of the Department of Skin Cancers, Cancer Immunotherapy and Development Therapeutics,
National Tumor Institute “Fondazione G. Pascale” 

Clinical Services Manager,
Biognosys 

This webinar, the second in our Next-Generation Proteomics for Precision Oncology series, will discuss how unbiased discovery proteomics can be used to identify new key mechanisms and signatures supporting clinical decision-making for melanoma patients.

Immune checkpoint inhibitors have proven to be an effective weapon against many solid tumors, but a large proportion of patients do not show a clinical benefit upon treatment. While studies have identified genomic or transcriptomic features responsible to some extent for the lack of response, major advancements in mass spectrometry-based proteomics have only recently enabled comprehensive functional analysis of the final gene products on an unprecedented scale, enabling quantitative and clinically relevant analysis of response mechanisms.

In this webinar, Paolo A. Ascierto, MD of Italy’s National Tumor Institute and Kamil Sklodowski of Biognosys will elaborate on the promise of proteomics for addressing the unmet medical needs of melanoma patients undergoing immunotherapy. 

They will discuss data from a joint project in which cancer tissue samples from late-stage melanoma patients prior to treatment with immune checkpoint inhibitors were analyzed using the Biognosys HRM discovery platform. 

They will share the clinical outcomes as well as the associated proteomic profiles of more than 8,500 identified and quantified proteins, providing a full picture of the capabilities of next-generation proteomics.

About The Series: Next-Generation Proteomics for Precision Oncology

This webinar series will highlight recent advancements in the proteomics field and the impact of proteomics on clinical research in oncology.

Sponsored by
Fri
Jun
18
12:00 pm2021
Sponsored by
Canexia Health

Disparities in Precision Oncology: Identifying Barriers and Moving Toward Solutions

GenomeWebinar

Community Outreach and Engagement Program Manager, Weill Cornell Medicine

Chief Scientist at the Baptist Memorial Healthcare Corporation & Director of the Multidisciplinary Thoracic Oncology Program, Baptist Cancer Center

Director of Clinical Research, Medical Oncology, Maine General Medical Center

Executive Director of Precision Medicine, Sutter Health

Last year, by Precision Oncology News' count, the FDA approved 27 precision oncology drugs, a 35 percent increase in the number of approvals from 2019. Although more and more biomarker-informed therapies are being developed and launched on the market, not all patients have access to them due to numerous barriers, among them difficulties accessing genetic testing, limited physician expertise, challenges setting up clinical trials in the community, and reimbursement pressures. Patients' social determinants of health also continue to influence whether they receive, or are even offered, biomarker testing and downstream treatment options. In this panel, experts in the community treating underserved populations and tracking access challenges will discuss the difficulties they are seeing and the solutions they're working on to improve equity in precision oncology.

Sponsored by