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In this on-demand video presentation, Dr. Keith Gligorich, laboratory operations director at Navican Precision Cancer Care, discusses his experiences implementing a next-generation sequencing quality management system at Navican. 
 
The presentation is part of "Genomics Clinical Implementation Success Stories," a series of video presentations sponsored by SeraCare highlighting successful examples of the implementation of genomics assays in the clinical setting. Download the white paper that accompanies this video here.  
 
Download the video to hear Dr. Gligorich explain the details of Navican's NGS quality management system and how it addresses the complexities of the precision medicine workflow.  
 
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Partner Webinar

LeukoStrat CDx FLT3 Mutation Assay - The Case for a Universal FLT3 Assay

Featured Speaker Dr. Bradley Patay

In this on-demand Webinar from Invivoscribe, learn more about the advantages of using a highly validated and precise companion diagnostic in the assessment of FLT3mutations in AML patients.

Sponsored by Invivoscribe®

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Partner Webinar

DNA and RNA hold the keys to resolving many of the toughest research challenges. MicroGEM’s approach to faster, nearly effortless, nucleic acid extractions empowers researchers to move quickly to their important work of treating and curing diseases; addressing water quality, crop health and food security; tackling crime scene analysis and human ID; and advancing many of the health, safety and environmental issues we face as a society.

This 15-minute on-demand webinar provides an overview of a temperature-driven approach to DNA and RNA extractions where speed, sample size, yield, and simplified workflow are important. Single-tube extractions produce high-quality nucleic acids in minutes, not hours, without the overuse of plastic or harsh chemicals. Reduced handling means fewer opportunities for contamination, all at an affordable cost. Gene therapy, molecular biology, pharmacology, forensics, environmental sciences, and plant pathology are just a few fields where MicroGEM is helping scientists move quickly to analysis, produce faster results, and make timely decisions about the implications of their studies

Watch the webinar to discover how to use enzymes derived from nature’s most extreme organisms to extract high-quality DNA and RNA from limited samples (from a single cell to thousands of cells) very quickly and at a reasonable cost.

Sponsored by
June 03, 2019
Sponsored by
SeraCare

A Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Reference Material

Partner Webinar

About 10-50 percent of Non-small-cell lung cancers have one of several activating EGFR driver mutations that have been clinically validated as therapeutic biomarkers for anti-EGFR drugs. Identifying these driver mutations through liquid biopsies is a promising alternative to traditional biopsies; however, the precision of mutation analysis for some of these targets remains a challenge.

Watch this video to see how Seracare developed a platform of single and low complexity, patient-like circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) reference standards that can be used in NGS and real-time PCR assays.

Sponsored by
GenomeWebinar

Clinical Microbiologist,
Ikazia Hospital

This webinar discusses the implementation of a rapid 24/7 PCR service in a small urban hospital setting.

Modern PCR technologies are changing the workflow of medical microbiology laboratories, making it possible to get molecular test results within an hour instead of days to weeks. Smaller and cheaper analyzers also make multiplex PCR techniques possible for smaller laboratories without a molecular department.

This webinar illustrates the impact of new PCR technologies in the hospital setting. Our speaker, Michiel van Rijn, is a clinical microbiologist and head of the Department of Clinical Microbiology at the Ikazia Hospital in Rotterdam. Although the Ikazia hospital is one of the smaller hospitals in Rotterdam (360 beds), it has offered a "24/7" PCR service to its medical staff for 10 years, starting with molecular screening for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in 2009. The hospital has expanded its portfolio in the last decade, and most recently rolled out multiplex syndromic testing in 2018.

In this webinar, Dr. van Rijn speaks about the implementation of a rapid 24/7 PCR service in his hospital and the effects of this service on patient outcomes and clinical decision making strategies. In particular, he shares his experiences with QIAstat-Dx syndromic testing and his expectation of further use of this technique in the future.

QIAstat-Dx is coming soon. Currently available as DiagCORE. DiagCORE is not available in all countries.

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Partner Webinar

Measurements of circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) hold great potential to detect residual disease and monitor therapeutic response and tumor evolution.

Download this poster and watch the video to learn more about this trial which covers the entire workflow from sample preparation through variant reporting.

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Partner Webinar

Fusion detection is an important part of cancer disease management, and there is an increasing need for highly multiplexed reference materials to cover mutations which may be rare or difficult to obtain. 

Watch this video and download this poster to see how this reference standard performed as a positive control in clinical RNA fusion assay development, validation, and bioinformatics pipeline optimization, in this multi-lab investigation. 

Sponsored by
GenomeWebinar

This webinar discusses the benefits of virus-specific target capture combined with next-generation sequencing (NGS) to identify viral infections and conduct comprehensive genomic and transcriptomic interrogation.

The high diversity of inter-virus genome types and intra-virus genomic heterogeneity, together with the complexity of sample types, make NGS-based clinical virology difficult, arduous, and expensive. A single method that is able to use nucleic acids that are of low quantity and poor quality to examine both DNA and RNA viruses from a mixed cell population that may include human, bacteria, and viruses would be ideal.  

To this end, our speaker, Darrell L. Dinwiddie of the University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, discusses a method his team has been evaluating that uses virus-specific target capture probe sets coupled with NGS. 

Dr. Dinwiddie discusses how this method has demonstrated significant improvement in respiratory viral identification and genome coverage compared to unenriched NGS. His team has shown the ability to effectively capture and sequence viruses that may differ from the probes by as much as 10 percent to 15 percent. These methods have worked for viral sequencing from purified viral stocks, in vitro cell culture, and clinical samples.

This webinar also addresses the broader implications of this work, including surveillance, epidemiologic studies, and public health planning.

For example, in two hospital outbreak studies, Dr. Dinwiddie and colleagues have shown that target capture and NGS enabled sensitive discrimination of the relatedness of respiratory syncytial virus and human parainfluenza virus 3 isolates obtained during the outbreak and provided evidence for source of transmission.

In addition, through multi-year retrospective and prospective NGS studies of respiratory viral infections at multiple pediatric hospitals, Dr. Dinwiddie and his team have been able to examine seasonal respiratory virus genomic variation, evolution, and distribution for several respiratory viruses. This includes evaluating the match of vaccine to circulating influenza virus strains and the correlation between virus strains and clinical severity of infections.  The recently developed Human Pan Viral sequencing methods by Illumina and Twist Bioscience will enable similar studies not only for respiratory viruses, but for all types of human viral pathogens across all sample types of interest. 

Sponsored by
GenomeWebinar

This webinar will discuss novel long-read transcript sequencing (LRTseq) methods for transcriptome annotation that could increase the efficiency and accuracy of future sequencing projects.

LRTseq technologies, such as Pacific Biosciences’ Iso-Seq and Oxford Nanopore’s cDNA sequencing, have the power to provide rapid high-quality de novo transcriptome annotations. However, standard cDNA library preparation methods for LRTseq capture a significant amount of degraded RNA and are often overpopulated with highly expressed genes.

Degraded RNA reduces the efficiency of sequencing and introduces uncertainty with respect to predicted transcription start sites. Highly expressed genes can dominate LRTseq data, resulting in a loss of coverage for lower expressed genes. This typically results in missing genes and alternative transcripts in the final genome annotation.

In this webinar, Richard Kuo of the Roslin Institute will discuss how his team addressed RNA degradation by using Lexogen’s cap-specific TeloPrime method to prepare full-length cDNA libraries. To reduce overabundant genes, Kuo and colleagues experimented with two methods of cDNA normalization.

He will present his team’s results using these novel methods of cDNA preparation for Iso-Seq sequencing and will also cover some basics of LRTseq and analysis pipelines for Iso-Seq (from raw data to transcriptome annotation). 

Sponsored by
April 26, 2019
Sponsored by
Oracle Health Sciences

Run Healthcare Workloads on Oracle HIPAA-Attested Cloud Services

Partner Webinar

Want to increase flexibility and agility while reducing costs by running healthcare workloads in the Cloud, but need assurance of HIPAA compliance for PHI data? Oracle successfully concluded another series of HIPAA attestations for Platform as a Service (PaaS) and Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS), adding to existing HIPAA-attested Software as a Service (SaaS) and SOC1/2 attestations for Cloud Services. We will discuss the results of the latest 3rd party attestations, healthcare use cases relevant for Oracle Cloud, and illustrations of successful healthcare customers.

During this webinar you will learn:
- New and existing HIPAA and SOC- attested Oracle Cloud Services 
- Oracle Cloud options that give you complete freedom to choose
- Healthcare use cases that are popular choices for moving to Oracle Cloud
- How other Healthcare organizations are succeeding with Oracle Cloud

Sponsored by
GenomeWebinar

This webinar provides a wide-ranging overview of the promise for metabolomics in studying human health and disease, as well as its potential for integration with other -omics disciplines.

Our speaker, Dr. Jerzy Adamski of the Helmholtz Center Munich, reviews current approaches in targeted and non-targeted metabolomics, highlighting differences in methodology, coverage, advantages, and disadvantages of either approach. 

This webinar puts a special emphasis on the universal applications of broad targeted metabolomics assays, which have shown promise in delineating factors contributing to the clinical phenotype, including intrinsic and environment-related processes. Dr. Adamski also touchs upon the benefits of calculating metabolite sums and ratios along the most important metabolic pathways.

The acknowledgement of the importance of host-microbiota interaction warrants a look at how metabolomics can help this rather young research field move beyond associations between disease risk and microbial genetics, and towards a more thorough functional understanding of the involved processes. For this purpose, Dr. Adamski highlights selected metabolic pathways that are known to be associated with gut microbiota and affect health via direct metabolic and immune-related effects.

Finally, Dr. Adamski discusses how metabolomics can integrate with other -omics technologies, providing examples of how metabolomics has enhanced genome-wide association studies, among others.

Sponsored by
GenomeWebinar

In 2016, the Association for Molecular Pathology (AMP), in partnership with the College of American Pathologists (CAP) and American College of Molecular Genetics (ACMG), launched a set of guidelines meant to set industry standards for reporting of molecular diagnostic test results in oncology, using a tier-based system and defined levels of evidence. Upon the release of these guidelines, several laboratories and molecular diagnostic decision-support companies incorporated them into their reporting to give pathologists and treating oncologists a more consistent report format that clearly conveys the level of importance and evidence for each variant, enabling them to provide the most relevant treatment options for oncology patients.

In this webinar, Dr. Timothy Cannon, Medical Director for Gastrointestinal Cancers at Inova Medical Group, Dr. Marilyn Li, Vice Chief of the Division of Genomic Diagnostics at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, and Dr. Sheryl Elkin, CSO of N-of-One, a Qiagen company, discuss adoption of the guidelines in the field to date, what’s working, and any new challenges/opportunities that have come from the initial launch.

Attendees can expect to learn about some of the complexities that exist in incorporating the AMP guidelines into treatment strategies, as well as what might be on the horizon in industry standardization for levels of evidence.  

Sponsored by
GenomeWebinar

This webinar provides an overview of current biomarker strategies for guiding the use of combination checkpoint immunotherapies in blood cancers.

Checkpoint immunotherapy has proven to be a powerful therapeutic against a variety of cancers, yet due to response rates that range between 20 percent and 40 percent, researchers and drug developers continue to seek ways to indicate response or non-response as early as possible. A particular area of focus is biomarkers that can assess the status of the pre-therapy tumor microenvironment in order to predict response.

Our speaker, Naval Daver of MD Anderson Cancer Center, discusses advanced immune-based approaches in acute myeloid leukemia that combine chemotherapy with checkpoint therapy, along with the relevant biomarker strategies associated with each.

Dr. Daver also describes a study based on a single-cell cytokine analysis system and Polyfunctional Strength Index (PSI) from Isoplexis that demonstrated that certain cytokine potency contributors, in particular from stimulatory cytokines, correlate with overall survival.

In addition, Jon Chen of Isoplexis shares several case studies using tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes in combination checkpoint immunotherapy that correlate polyfunction to outcome.

*Due to the location of our speakers, this webinar is pre-recorded.

Sponsored by
GenomeWebinar

This webinar reviews a recent study that applied whole-genome sequencing and optical genome mapping to identify a large number of previously undetected somatic structural variants in leukemia samples. 

Genomic analysis has driven major advances in leukemia, where the spectrum of driver mutations provides a much more rigorous classification of disease subtypes, with a correspondingly more robust prognostic power, than previous histological characterization.

In this webinar, Dr. James Broach, Director of the Penn State Institute for Personalized Medicine, discusses a study that indicates there are far more structural variants in leukemia than previously thought.

Dr. Broach and his team combined whole-genome sequencing and optical genome mapping to a number of adult and pediatric leukemia samples. The method identified 97 percent of the structural variants previously reported by karyotype analysis of these samples, as well as an additional fivefold more such somatic rearrangements. 

The method identified on average tens of previously unrecognizable inversions and duplications and hundreds of previously unrecognizable insertions and deletions. These structural variants affected a number of leukemia-associated genes as well as cancer driver genes not previously associated with leukemia and genes not previously associated with cancer. Analysis indicates that the status of several of the recurrently mutated genes identified in this study significantly affect survival of AML patients.

Dr. Broach discusses the implications of the findings, which suggest that current genomic analysis methods fail to identify a majority of structural variants in leukemia samples — an omission that may hamper diagnostic and prognostic efforts.

Sponsored by
GenomeWebinar

 

 

This webinar will present the utility of a personalized in silico analytical approach for the routine clinical diagnosis of channelopathies and cardiomyopathies.

The advent of next-generation sequencing (NGS) has greatly improved the ability to rapidly assess many genes at the same time, but the analysis and interpretation of complex genomic variants still remains a challenge. In order for NGS to find use in routine diagnostics, clinical laboratories must be able to overcome this complexity and enable better outcomes for patients.

Dr. Alexandre Janin, member of the molecular cardiogenetic lab at Hospices Civils de Lyon in France, has solved this complexity and successfully characterized difficult variants by adopting the Sophia Platform.

Dr. Janin will discuss how the platform:

  • Enables fast and comprehensive analysis;
  • Detects copy number variations quickly and efficiently;
  • Facilitates variant interpretation by sharing knowledge among members of the national network for Hereditary Cardiac Diseases (Cardiogen)

Dr. Janin will be joined by Dr. Audrey Coiffic, Clinical Application Product Manager at Sophia Genetics, who will discuss the most recent developments in targeted solutions for the advanced detection of inherited cardiac diseases.

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Retraction Watch reports that a paper was pulled because it refers to a gene that doesn't exist in mice.

Researchers were able to generate fertilized northern white rhinoceros eggs, according to Mashable.

Former Orig3n employees raise concerns about its testing at Bloomberg Businessweek.

In PLOS this week: microRNA expression changes in hepatocellular carcinoma, real-time PCR-based approach for diagnosing schistosomiasis, and more.

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