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The Scan

May Chat Again

Times Higher Education reports that the University of California and Elsevier may resume negotiations.

Resignation Call

The Observer reports that there have been calls for a University of College London geneticists to resign due to research fraud coming out of his lab.

No Access

Buzzfeed News reports that Family Tree DNA declined to give Parabon Nanolabs access to its database.

In PLOS this week: sub-telomeric sequence diversity in dozens of human populations, variant linked to ataxia in dog breed, and more. 

A new analysis finds that Neanderthal ancestry can be found across human populations, including among Africans.

Zimbabwe, facing drought and possible famine, lifts its ban and imports genetically modified corn, according to Bloomberg.

Researchers in South Africa are concerned that breeding experiments will lead to a loss of genetic diversity among key species there, according to the Guardian.

In Science this week: genetic mutation linked to schizophrenia among South African Xhosas, engineering the bee microbiome to address parasite and virus, and more.

Now the Terms

Nature News notes that Brexit will be followed by months of negotiating, including about scientific research.

Out in the Field

CNN reports that a field test of genetically engineered diamondback moths show they act much like wild diamondback moths.

Differences in gene expression affect how plants develop different leaf shapes, Smithsonian Magazine reports.

In Nature this week: sequencing analysis finds some cells in the lungs of former smokers have mutational burdens that were equivalent to those of never-smokers, and more.

Call for an End

Three US lawmakers call on the Trump Administration to end its program to collect DNA from detained migrants, the Hill reports.

Going for a Header

Soccer players who head the ball a lot and who have a certain APOE allele may be more likely to have memory problems, according to HealthDay.

Researchers in the US have developed a promising candidate vaccine against African swine fever, according to Bloomberg News.

In Cell this week: a quantitative proteomic atlas based on the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia, gene regulation and differentiation in Toxoplasma gondii, and more.

Harvard Prof Charged

A Harvard University professor has been charged with making false claims regarding funds he received from China, the New York Times reports.

Level of Transparency

Nature News reports that a US panel is reviewing current guidelines for federally funded gain-of-function viral research.

Discover magazine reports that animal dissections might dissuade students from science careers, but that a firm has developed synthetic frogs for dissections.

In PNAS this week: de novo mutation patterns among the Amish, an alternative RNA-seq method, and more.

For Scientific Talent

Following its departure from the European Union, the UK is to implement a fast-track visa program aimed at attracting scientific talent to Britain, according to BBC News.

Speedy Work

The Washington Post reports that researchers are quickly analyzing the coronavirus that has been causing illness and sharing their findings.

ScienceInsider reports that researchers in Brazil are concerned that a creationist was chosen to run the agency that oversees graduate study programs there.

In PLOS this week: common variant associated with BMI in Arctic populations, analysis of microRNA markers associated with being born small for gestational age, and more. 

Layoffs at 23andMe

Direct-to-consumer genetic testing firm 23andMe is laying off about 100 people.

Pages

Master's and doctoral students in the UK call on funding groups to extend their grants for the duration of the disruption caused by the COVID-19 outbreak, the Guardian reports.

Squid can make edits to their RNA within the cytoplasm of their axons, Science News reports.

The Chan Zuckerberg Initiative is putting $25 million toward COVID-19 treatment research, according to the Verge.

In Science this week: researchers engineer version of Cas9 that is nearly PAM-less, and more.