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The Scan

New research shows that scientists need to do a better job of including a wider diversity of African genomes in their analyses, STAT says.

A new paper in Science shows that men are still winning a large majority of the most sought-after NIH grants.

Science Like a Girl

Nature Research and the Estée Lauder Companies are awarding efforts to encourage girls to pursue careers in the STEM fields.

In Science this week: beneficial genetic variants inherited from archaic Neanderthal and Denisovan hominins, and more.

O Canad[ian Science]!

As the Canadian election season heats up, neither major party has really paid much attention to science, according to Nature News.

BBC News says the uncertainty over Brexit is affecting science funding in the UK.

A new app purports to tell users "how gay" they are by looking at their DNA, but experts tell Futurism that the app is bunk.

In Nature this week: human and great ape cerebral organoids reveal aspects of brain development unique to humans, and more.

Genome of an Oak

A new study catalogues the genome and evolutionary history of the oak family, UPI reports.

Dog DNA testing is a growing market, but there's still a lot of uncertainty about the accuracy of the results, the Boston Globe says.

Amelia, Is That You?

A University of South Florida researcher is testing bone fragments to determine if they belong to Amelia Earhart.

In Cell this week: antisense Piwi-interacting RNA responses to endogenous retroviruses, proteomic patterns in hepatocellular carcinoma, and more.

A South African university has told the Wellcome Sanger Institute to return DNA samples it has from indigenous African communities, The Times reports.

The University of California, Berkeley's Rasmus Nielsen and Xinzhu Wei have retracted their CCR5 gene paper due to a technical artifact.

 

University of Virginia researchers are exploring a genetic risk test to gauge type 1 diabetes risk, NPR reports.

In PNAS this week: researchers compare two high-grade neuroendocrine lung cancers, height among ancient Europeans, and more.

In PLOS this week: preconception carrier screening program results, comparative genomics-based analysis of Elizabethkingia meningoseptica, and more.

Canadian regulators are beginning to share information from new drug studies, Undark reports.

Researchers explore a possible genetic cause for some cases of sudden infant death syndrome, KOMO News reports.

In a column at the Dallas Morning News, the Stanley Medical Research Institute's E. Fuller Torrey says the Human Genome Project hasn't delivered on promised results.

By studying koalas and a retrovirus that infects them, researchers may have uncovered a new sort of 'immune response' that occurs at the genomic level, Agence France Presse reports.

23andMe has a holiday popup shop at a mall and could open additional stores, Bloomberg reports.

Bound for Home

NPR reports that the first person in the US given a gene editing-based therapy for a genetic disorder is heading home.

In Science this week: ancient genomes reveal social inequality within individual households, new method for quantifying genetic variation in gene dosage, and more.

Quite Personalized

Researchers developed a custom genetic drug for a child with a progressive neurological disorder, the New York Times reports.

Pages

ScienceInsider reports that rude and unprofessional paper reviewers are common and can have harmful effects.

The US Senate has confirmed Stephen Hahn as the next commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration, according to the New York Times.

CNBC reports Apple is partnering with Color Genomics to offer its employees free DNA screening for disease.

In Science this week: researchers use CRISPR tool to find gut microbiome molecules involved in immunity, and more.