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The Scan

Carnegie Mellon University and Elsevier make a "read-and-publish" deal, Inside Higher Ed reports.

According to the Associated Press, police in Germany are seeking DNA samples from 900 men to tackle a cold case.

Forbes reports on firms using artificial intelligence to diagnose rare genetic diseases.

In PNAS this week: genomic analysis of the venomous Hispaniolan solenodon, Epstein-Barr virus amplification in replication compartments, and more.

In PLOS this week: genome-wide association study of epigenetic age acceleration, antimicrobial resistance genes found in organic egg farm samples, and more.

Retraction Watch reports that the National Institutes of Health plans to remove conditions it placed on Duke University in 2018 following instances of research misconduct.

New Scientist reports that embryo screening from the firm Genomic Prediction has been used in at least one pregnancy.

A genome-wide association study links more than 40 genes associated with being left handed, Psychology Today reports.

A bioethicist from Abertay University uses a utilitarian approach to justify genetically modifying the human germline, the BBC reports.

The General Data Protection Regulation has slowed some data sharing with non-European researchers as they find ways to comply with the law, ScienceInsider reports.

To Keep Track

The US has upgraded its network of public health labs to provide whole-genome sequencing to track antibiotic-resistant bacteria, Quartz reports.

In Science this week: approach to visualize 3D genome structure in single cells, RNA interference knockdown screens to examine genetic origins of beetle horns and insect wings,  and more.

The US Food and Drug Administration has approved an RNA interference drug to treat acute hepatic porphyria.

Hahn Hearing

Stephen Hahn, the nominee to lead the US Food and Drug Administration, underwent a Senate confirmation hearing yesterday, the Washington Post reports.

Decade of DTC

Gizmodo looks over the past decade of consumer DNA testing to find the field to be lacking.

In Nature this week: native RNA sequencing and analysis of a human poly(A) transcriptome, nanopore sequencing-based method to analyze short tandem repeat expansions, and more.

Treatment So Far

NPR reports that the patient who underwent a CRISPR-based treatment for sickle cell disease is doing well.

Resistance to ash dieback disease among some UK ash trees appears polygenic, the Independent reports.

In Nucleic Acids Research this week: sequencing strategy for flash-frozen brain tissue bank samples, new version of ChlamDB, and more.

A UK woman is suing three National Health Service Trusts for not telling her about her father's Huntington's disease diagnosis, the BBC reports.

The president of Nankai University is embroiled in a data manipulation scandal, the South China Morning Post reports.

LiveScience reports that a novel mutation in the LPL gene was uncovered in three siblings with very high triglyceride levels.

In PNAS this week: cytotoxic CD4 T cell signature in supercentenarians, evolutionary history of beetles, and more.

At Altitude

Alterations to particular gene may enable the Quechua of Peru to better tolerate high-altitude life, Ars Technica reports.

For Later in Life

Bioethicists disagree with a research team's decision to allow the return of risk results for adult-onset conditions from a newborn sequencing project, according to Reuters.

Pages

The Washington Post reports that a Russian Academy of Sciences commission has led to the retraction of hundreds of scientific papers.

The Los Angeles Times' Daily Pilot reports the chief executive of Vantari Genetics has pleaded guilty in a kickback scheme.

News 4 Jax reports that a Florida bill to prevent life and long-term care insurers from using genetic information in their coverage decisions has easily passed one committee.

In Science this week: potentially pathogenic mutations found in hematopoietic stem cells from young healthy donors, and more.