Close Menu

The Scan

According to the New York Times, President-elect Joe Biden is nominating Xavier Becerra to lead the Department of Health and Human Services.

For Fetal Hemoglobin

Researchers report promising results from a study examining a CRISPR-based treatment for sickle-cell disease, according to the Associated Press.

Not Quite as Many

The Washington Post reports officials expect fewer SARS-CoV-2 vaccine doses to be available by the end of the year than was predicted earlier in the pandemic.

In PLOS this week: integrative software tool to analyze microbiome data, lipidome of ascariasis-causing nematode, and more.

IBM security researchers warn of a phishing campaign targeted at organizations involved in the distribution of SARS-CoV-2 vaccines, the Verge reports.

Lying Plea

A researcher accused of smuggling research materials out of the US has pleaded guilty to making false statements, according to the Associated Press.

The Illinois police have cut the number of DNA tests waiting to be run in about half, CBS Chicago reports.

In Science this week: gene expression signature linked to nonalcoholic fatty liver disease progression, and more.

Mouse Vision Restored

A Harvard-led team reprogrammed DNA methylation patterns of mice with eye problems to restore their sight, AFP reports.

The New York Times reports Moderna is planning a clinical trial of its SARS-CoV-2 vaccine in children.

A man in India is suing the Serum Institute of India, saying that he suffered serious side effects from a vaccine it is testing, but the institute has rejected those claims, the Economic Times reports.

In Nature this week: Readfish tool for targeted nanopore sequencing, genomic diversity of barley and wheat, and more.

Vaccine Authorization

The UK has given emergency authorization for Pfizer and BioNTech's SARS-CoV-2 vaccine, the Associated Press reports.

A US advisory committee says healthcare workers and nursing home residents should be prioritized to receive a SARS-CoV-2 vaccine, according to the Financial Times.

The Wall Street Journal reports North Korean hackers have targeted half a dozen companies developing SARS-CoV-2 vaccines.

In Cell this week: long-term SARS-CoV-2 shedding, examination of the effects of a coronavirus spike protein mutation, and more.

The Guardian reports that DeepMind Technologies' AlphaFold can predict how proteins fold.

Earlier in the US

An analysis of blood donations suggests SARS-CoV-2 was present in the US weeks earlier than thought, according to NPR.

Who's to Be First?

CNBC reports that a US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention advisory panel is to vote on how to distribute COVID-19 vaccines.

In PNAS this week: targeting progesterone signaling in ovarian cancer, LINE-1 retrotransposition events in adenocarcinomas, and more.

Moderna to Seek EUA

Moderna is applying for an Emergency Use Authorization for its coronavirus vaccine, according to the New York Times.

Bloomberg reports AstraZeneca may conduct another study of its candidate SARS-CoV-2 vaccine after dosing error.

To Spot it Earlier

The National Health Service is to conduct a trial of Grail's blood-based screening test for cancer.

In PLOS this week: somatic mutation patterns of glioblastomas among Lebanese patients, phenome-wide study using UK Biobank data, and more.

Wired reports on a microbial analysis of sketches drawn by Leonardo DaVinci.

Pages

Reuters reports that Germany is seeking to sequence 5 percent of patient samples that test positive for SARS-CoV-2.

The publisher of the Science family of journals will allow some authors to place peer-reviewed versions of their papers into publicly accessible repositories.

23andMe and Medscape say primary care physicians are increasingly more comfortable with discussing direct-to-consumer genetic testing results.

In Science this week: analysis of genome-wide association studies of chronic kidney disease, and more.