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The Scan

Agreement on Budget

Lawmakers in the US have come to a budget agreement that includes funding boosts for many science agencies.

According to Retraction Watch, updated betaherpesviruses sequences in GenBank led to a paper being retracted.

In PNAS this week: evolutionary paths of influenza B virus lineages, APOBEC3 gene amplification with increasing endogenous retroviruses, and more.

Parakeet Extinction

A new genetic analysis implicates people in the extinction of Carolina parakeets, according to National Geographic.

Consumer Reports examines the complexities of giving a DNA testing kit as a holiday gift.

The Washington Post reports that critics have called George Church's genetic dating app a form of eugenics, but he has pushed back against the characterization.

In PLOS this week: method to fine-map expression quantitative trait loci, gene expression patterns in elderly burn victims, and more.

The US Senate has confirmed Stephen Hahn as the next commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration, according to the New York Times.

That Rude Reviewer

ScienceInsider reports that rude and unprofessional paper reviewers are common and can have harmful effects.

CNBC reports Apple is partnering with Color Genomics to offer its employees free DNA screening for disease.

In Science this week: researchers use CRISPR tool to find gut microbiome molecules involved in immunity, and more.

A genetic alteration appears to increase heart failure risk among people of African descent, according to the Washington Post.

Gene editing could be an issue competitive sports need to address soon, four researchers from Arizona State University write at Slate.

A Different Future

In his look back at the past decade, BuzzFeed News' Peter Aldhous writes that direct-to-consumer genetic testing has led to "Facebook for genes."

In Nature this week: genetic "clock" that can predict the lifespans of vertebrates, new assembler called wtdbg2, and more.

Science reports a new US defense bill would establish two groups aimed at combating foreign influence on research. 

Nobel Representation

In a cartoon, Vox explores the lack of women among this year's winners of the Nobel Prize.

Nature Biotechnology discusses promising early results from two clinical trials of CRISPR-based therapy for β-thalassemia and sickle cell disease.

In Cell this week: analysis of tissue clones, metagenomic studies of ocean water samples, and more.

Forensic genetic firm Verogen has bought the genetic genealogy site GEDmatch.

Researchers have 3D-printed plastic bunnies that encase the information needed to make more such bunnies in DNA, according to Discover magazine.

Dan Rather, the former CBS Evening News anchor and executive producer of a new documentary, writes at the Guardian that everyone needs to know about CRISPR.

In PNAS this week: analysis of FOXA1 upregulation in ER-positive breast cancer, gene editing to correct recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa, and more.

Taking It All On

60 Minutes speaks with Harvard's George Church about tackling the effects of aging and more.

The New York Times reports on an effort to address in high school biology classes misconceptions regarding race and genetics.

Pages

The Washington Post reports that a Russian Academy of Sciences commission has led to the retraction of hundreds of scientific papers.

News 4 Jax reports that a Florida bill to prevent life and long-term care insurers from using genetic information in their coverage decisions has easily passed one committee.

The Los Angeles Times' Daily Pilot reports the chief executive of Vantari Genetics has pleaded guilty in a kickback scheme.

In Science this week: potentially pathogenic mutations found in hematopoietic stem cells from young healthy donors, and more.