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The Scan

Open at Publication

Howard Hughes Medical Institute will be requiring its researchers to publish their work so it is immediately accessible to the public, ScienceInsider writes.

Truth and Science

The Huffington Post reports that Francis Collins, the director of the US National Institutes of Health, has urged Americans to recommit to reason.

About 150 million rapid coronavirus tests purchased by the US federal government are to be distributed to nursing homes, colleges, and the states, according to the New York Times.

In Nature this week: multi-omic analysis of Alzheimer's disease brain samples, de novo assembly of a diploid potato, and more.

Funds to Get Vaccines

The World Bank is seeking approval for a $12 billion plan to provide low-income nations with funds to procure SARS-CoV-2 vaccines, according to Reuters.

Herbert Tabor Dies

The Washington Post reports that Herbert Tabor, who worked at the US National Institutes of Health for 77 years, has died at 101.

A Number on It

Science writes that public health officials and others are debating whether cycle threshold values should be included on SARS-CoV-2 results.

In Nucleic Acids Research this week: online database of SARS-CoV-2 protein structures, atlas of the human brain, and more.

Millions of Tests

The World Health Organization will be providing low-cost COVID-19 tests to low- and middle-income nations, according to Reuters.

Arthur Ashkin Dies

Nobel Prize-winner Arthur Ashkin, who developed optical tweezers, has died at 98, the Washington Post reports.

Nature News examines how the confirmation of Amy Coney Barrett to the US Supreme Court could affect scientific agencies.

In PNAS this week: altered gene expression in brain samples from Alzheimer's disease patients, effects of gene mutations found in bladder cancer, and more.

The Washington Post reports that the White House chief of staff has asked the US Food and Drug Administration to justify the stricter standards it is seeking for a coronavirus vaccine.

Test Evaluations

UK Royal Statistical Society is organizing a working group to develop guidelines for assessing COVID-19 tests, the Guardian reports.

Concerns Over Comment

President Donald Trump's "good genes" comment raises eugenics concerns, CNN reports.

In PLOS this week: genetic analysis of tremor condition, analysis of a West and Central African tree used in traditional medicine, and more.

This Time, Novavax

Novavax has begun a phase III trial of its SARS-CoV-2 vaccine, according to the New York Times.

New York's Own Review

The governor of New York says the state will conduct its own review of any SARS-CoV-2 vaccine, NPR reports.

Vox reports that the Trump Administration may limit student visas for individuals from some countries to two years.

This week in Science: Neanderthal Y chromosomes replaced by Homo sapiens Y chromosomes, and more.

And Maybe Not

President Donald Trump might not approve the stricter standards the US Food and Drug Administration is developing for authorizing a SARS-CoV-2 vaccine, according to Politico.

Wired reports that Oxitec has now developed a genetically modified fall armyworm.

This Variant Here

A large genetic study finds SARS-CoV-2 viruses with a certain variant are spreading more than others, according to the Washington Post.

In Nature this week: sister-chromatid-sensitive chromosome conformation capture approach, and more.

The US Food and Drug Administration is to announce stricter standards for emergency authorizations of SARS-CoV-2 vaccines, reports the Washington Post.

Pages

According to CNBC, Pfizer has announced that its SARS-CoV-2 vaccine data won't be ready this week.

A number of United Nations agencies push for scientific findings to be made accessible through open science.

Paris-Saclay University garners international regard following a decade-long effort to establish the new research university, Nature News reports.

In Nucleic Acids Research this week: database to house IndiGen sequencing data, database of SARS-CoV-2 docking scores, and more.