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The Scan

In Science this week: genetic mutation linked to schizophrenia among South African Xhosas, engineering the bee microbiome to address parasite and virus, and more.

Now the Terms

Nature News notes that Brexit will be followed by months of negotiating, including about scientific research.

Out in the Field

CNN reports that a field test of genetically engineered diamondback moths show they act much like wild diamondback moths.

Differences in gene expression affect how plants develop different leaf shapes, Smithsonian Magazine reports.

In Nature this week: sequencing analysis finds some cells in the lungs of former smokers have mutational burdens that were equivalent to those of never-smokers, and more.

Call for an End

Three US lawmakers call on the Trump Administration to end its program to collect DNA from detained migrants, the Hill reports.

Going for a Header

Soccer players who head the ball a lot and who have a certain APOE allele may be more likely to have memory problems, according to HealthDay.

Researchers in the US have developed a promising candidate vaccine against African swine fever, according to Bloomberg News.

In Cell this week: a quantitative proteomic atlas based on the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia, gene regulation and differentiation in Toxoplasma gondii, and more.

Harvard Prof Charged

A Harvard University professor has been charged with making false claims regarding funds he received from China, the New York Times reports.

Level of Transparency

Nature News reports that a US panel is reviewing current guidelines for federally funded gain-of-function viral research.

Discover magazine reports that animal dissections might dissuade students from science careers, but that a firm has developed synthetic frogs for dissections.

In PNAS this week: de novo mutation patterns among the Amish, an alternative RNA-seq method, and more.

For Scientific Talent

Following its departure from the European Union, the UK is to implement a fast-track visa program aimed at attracting scientific talent to Britain, according to BBC News.

Speedy Work

The Washington Post reports that researchers are quickly analyzing the coronavirus that has been causing illness and sharing their findings.

ScienceInsider reports that researchers in Brazil are concerned that a creationist was chosen to run the agency that oversees graduate study programs there.

In PLOS this week: common variant associated with BMI in Arctic populations, analysis of microRNA markers associated with being born small for gestational age, and more. 

Layoffs at 23andMe

Direct-to-consumer genetic testing firm 23andMe is laying off about 100 people.

Letting Samples Fly

Rady Children's Institute for Genomic Medicine and Deloitte are looking into the use of drones to transport samples for testing. 

Dusty Resistance

Researchers from Northwestern University examined dust for antibiotic-resistance genes, New Scientist reports. 

In Science this week: researchers present a computational method for predicting cellular differentiation state from single-cell RNA sequencing data, and more. 

An initial analysis suggests the novel coronavirus from Wuhan that is sickening people might come from snakes, a team of virologists writes at the Conversation.

DNA testing confirms captured Chicago coyote same as the one that bit a boy near a nature museum, the Chicago Tribune reports.

Viruses on Ice

An analysis of Tibetan ice cores uncovers more than two dozen previously unknown virus groups, LiveScience reports.

In Nature this week: genomic analysis of four children buried in Cameroon approximately 3,000 and 8,000 years ago, and more.

Pages

A federal judge has ruled that drug companies, device manufacturers, and universities need to provide missing clinical data from hundreds of trials to a federal website, ScienceInsider reports.

A genetic analysis suggests red pandas might actually belong to two different species, New Scientist reports.

NPR reports that the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has fixed the problem with some of its SARS-CoV-2 testing kits.

In Nature this week: epigenetic factors that prevent healthy aging and more.